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Download The Dragon in the Sea fb2

by Frank Herbert
Download The Dragon in the Sea fb2
Science Fiction
  • Author:
    Frank Herbert
  • ISBN:
    0450045471
  • ISBN13:
    978-0450045479
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    New English Library; paperback / softback edition (1979)
  • Pages:
    189 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Science Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1542 kb
  • ePUB format
    1276 kb
  • DJVU format
    1499 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    543
  • Formats:
    mbr mobi lrf txt


Home Frank Herbert The Dragon in the Se. The author and publisher have provided this e-book to you without Digital Rights Management software (DRM) applied so that you can enjoy reading it on your personal devices.

Home Frank Herbert The Dragon in the Sea. Home. The dragon in the sea, . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23. This e-book is for your personal use only.

Home Frank Herbert The Dragon in the Se. 2. Nothing certain, said Ramsey. I’ve heard it argued both ways. He glanced at the scope in front of him. I think it may be our only chance. Joe, take over here, said Bonnett. That’s a stupid question, Les. Bonnett colored. The Ram pitched and bobbed in the seas. I agree with you, Skipper, said Bonnett. One way of dying is as good as another. 0. Ramsey moved to obey.

His first Science Fiction story was published in 1952 but he achieved fame more than ten years later with the publication in Analog of Dune World and The Prophet of Dune, which were amalgamated into the novel Dune in 1965. Winner of both the Nebula and the Hugo awards, it is the best selling SF novel of all time. com/entry/herbert frank.

Frank Herbert is the author of the 1965 science fiction classic, Dune. He passed away in 1986. For a relatively short book, Frank Herbert manages to write a psychological-spy thriller with important themes that are incredibly relevant today

Frank Herbert is the author of the 1965 science fiction classic, Dune. For a relatively short book, Frank Herbert manages to write a psychological-spy thriller with important themes that are incredibly relevant today. This is one amazingly good book and it is a shame that Frank Herbert is seen as the author of one good book. Was every book he wrote a home run? No.

The blonde WAVE secretary at the reception desk took the speaker cup of a sono-typer away from her mouth, bent over an intercom box. "Ensign Ramsey is here, sir," she said. She leaned back, stared up at the redheaded officer beside her desk. His collar bore the zigzag of electronics specialist over the initials BP - Bureau of Psychology. He was a tall man, round-faced, with the soft appearance of overweight. Freckles spotted his pinkish face, giving him the look of a grown-up Tom Sawyer

The Dragon in the Sea (1956), also known as Under Pressure from its serialization, is a novel by Frank Herbert. It was first serialized in Astounding magazine from 1955 to 1956, then reworked and published as a book in 1956

The Dragon in the Sea (1956), also known as Under Pressure from its serialization, is a novel by Frank Herbert. It was first serialized in Astounding magazine from 1955 to 1956, then reworked and published as a book in 1956. A 1961 2nd printing of the Avon paperback, catalog G-1092, was titled 21st Century Sub with the original title in parentheses. It is usually classified as a psychological novel.

This book was local author Frank Herbert's first and is on a list of Defining Science Fiction books of the 50. Dragon in the Sea is quite a departure from Dune.

This book was local author Frank Herbert's first and is on a list of Defining Science Fiction books of the 50s. More thriller than SF, it is part sub warfare and part psychological drama. For this book, he goes one step further and leaves off the chapter divisions to create a literary claustrophobia to match the claustrophobic conditions of the submarine.

Vintage paperback

Giamah
Today, the Cold War is "over." Despite that and the United States's hegemonic status, the US's major threat, according to its own military, is Russia. With the growing threat of the EU, China, and our interests in maintaining our strength, this book, despite being written when the Cold War was still a readily apparent threat, is highly relevant today. First, at a much smaller level, it discusses the politics and conflict over a finite resource. Of course, this a theme that Herbert would expand upon in his phenomenal Dune, 40th Anniversary Edition (Dune Chronicles, Book 1) series. However, in this book, the resource is not spice, but oil and the backdrop is a nuclear submarine sent from "Western Waters" to "Eastern Waters" (i.e. the North America and its surrounding oceans to Russia and its surrounding Russia) and secretly pump out oil from underwater oil fields that belong to the Eastern Powers. The West and the East have been at war for a decade.

Meanwhile, these submarines are manned by a small crew. Small screw, confined situation, claustrophobic environment... sounds another set of settings that Herbert would later explore in Destination: Void and good setting to analyze leadership. Herbert goes further than that and examines how Religion might be used both a source of social solidarity and social control, something especially important in such a confined environment with a small crew.

Lastly, the psychological elements. The crews of these submarines are prone to insanity and suicide. The government sends in a psychologist to one of these submarines to figure out why. It also knows that Military Command and crew could have sleeper cells sent from Russia to sabotage the system. The Psychologist needs to figure out who...

For a relatively short book, Frank Herbert manages to write a psychological-spy thriller with important themes that are incredibly relevant today. This is one amazingly good book and it is a shame that Frank Herbert is seen as the author of one good book. Was every book he wrote a home run? No. No author has nothing but home runs. But Herbert's other work should get more respect and critical reevaluation. I can only hope some others get in print. As for this one... buy it if you want a book that goes beyond the words on the page and gets you to think. No Herbert doesn't provide you all the answers, that's up to you decide. But at least he asks the questions and presents possible situations and settings. Which is all any good author should do.
Lbe
This has remained a favorite of mine for some decades now, and after reading the DUNE stories, it's well to look back and see Herbert's breadth of imagination in such an overwhelmingly claustrophobic setting. Just one caveat: the book-jacket illustration is grotesque. The story inside is a classic, to be read again and again.
Bundis
It is important to remember when this was written. It is shocking how much he got right before widespread use of naval nuclear reactors. I read this story when it came out, in the middle fifties, and it left an indelible impression. He was of course wrong about vacuum tubes hanging on in wide use into the twenty first century, but still, a tour de force. Though I, for one, liked vacuum tubes. And he certainly got the danger from sleepers right, too. It wore better with time than With the Night Mail or Land Ironclads did. Amazing.
Direbringer
The first FHerbert novel .... great for a first novel .... otherwise a bit tedious. Gives great insight into what came after ... the Dune novels and probably most of the other stand alones.
Niwield
A great read in an arena familiar to few—submarines!
Herbert develops his characters under pressure and the shift, squirm and grow. Lots to enjoy and admire esp. in the interplay of psychiatry and religion.
Akirg
I don't consider myself prone to sea sickness, but this book gave me one. Maybe, that's just how captivating the story was... This book is not a pure science-fiction novel; it has a hint of mystery in the plot. I read this for a science fiction course in college. I don't plan to read this a second time, though.
Goldendragon
I have liked this book for decades. It is a little dated, but it holds up well. A good read
Like most of Herbert's work, The Dragon in the Sea is full of the kind of details that makes you think that you are there and that you understand what makes the characters tick.