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by John Shirley
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Science Fiction
  • Author:
    John Shirley
  • ISBN:
    0964250519
  • ISBN13:
    978-0964250512
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Eyeball Books; Revised edition (June 1, 1996)
  • Pages:
    216 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Science Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1141 kb
  • ePUB format
    1128 kb
  • DJVU format
    1448 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    153
  • Formats:
    lit lrf lrf doc


Start Publishing LLC, 19 сент He has been several Year's Best anthologies including Prime Books' THE . Other John Shirley story collections include BLACK BUTTERFLIES, IN EXTREMIS, and LIVING SHADOWS.

Start Publishing LLC, 19 сент. He has been several Year's Best anthologies including Prime Books' THE YEAR'S BEST DARK FANTASY AND HORROR anthology, and his nwest story collection is IN EXTREMIS: THE MOST EXTREME SHORT STORIES OF JOHN SHIRLEY. His novel BIOSHOCK: RAPTURE telling the story of the creation and undoing of Rapture, from the hit videogame BIOSHOCK is out from TOR books; his Halo novel, HALO: BROKEN CIRCLE is coming out from Pocket Books.

City Come a-Walkin' book. William Gibson in his introduction to CITY COME A-WALKIN’ says that with this novel John Shirley all but invented cyberpunk

City Come a-Walkin' book. William Gibson in his introduction to CITY COME A-WALKIN’ says that with this novel John Shirley all but invented cyberpunk. Gibson even admits unconsciously stealing from the book when he wrote his groundbreaking sci-fi. All this is true, I just wish I’d come across Shirley’s weird tale of San Francisco as a sentient being when it was first published in 1980 or even when this reprint was reissued in the late 1990s.

City Come A-Walkin' - John Shirley The lead guitar took a long solo, defining youth in. .sometimes the gods walk the earth like mortal men. And tonight the city come a-walkin’

City Come A-Walkin' - John Shirley. And tonight the city come a-walkin’. and we’re all obsolet. atz shrieked it not quite on key and barely in time to the music and the crowd had no idea what she was saying.

Stu Cole is struggling to keep his nightclub, Club Anesthesia, afloat in the face of mob harassment when hes visited by a manifestation of the city of San Francisco, crystallized into a single enigmatic being

Stu Cole is struggling to keep his nightclub, Club Anesthesia, afloat in the face of mob harassment when hes visited by a manifestation of the city of San Francisco, crystallized into a single enigmatic being. This amoral superhero leads him on a terrifying journey through the rock and roll demimonde as they struggle to save the city. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

ISBN 10: 0964250519 ISBN 13: 9780964250512. Publisher: Eyeball Books, 1996. Stu Cole is struggling to keep his nightclub, Club Anesthesia, afloat in the face of mob harassment when he's visited by a manifestation of the city of San Francisco, crystallized into a single enigmatic being.

John Shirley is the author of more than thirty novels. He is considered seminal to the cyberpunk movement in science fiction and has been called the postmodern Poe of horror. His numerous short stories have been compiled into eight collections including Black Butterflies: A Flock on the Darkside, winner of the Bram Stoker Award, the International Horror Guild Award, and named as one of the best one hundred books of the year by Publishers Weekly. He has written scripts for television and film, and is best known as co-writer of The Crow.

In Extremis: The Most Extreme Short Stories of John Shirley.

Also by John Shirley: Prev. In Extremis: The Most Extreme Short Stories of John Shirley. Gurdjieff: An Introduction to His Life and Ideas.

John Shirley is the author of many novels, including Demons, Crawlers, In Darkness Waiting, City Come A-Walkin', and Eclipse, as well as collections of stories, which include Really, Really, Really, Really, Weird Stories and the Bram-Stoker-award winning collection Black Butterflies an.

John Shirley is the author of many novels, including Demons, Crawlers, In Darkness Waiting, City Come A-Walkin', and Eclipse, as well as collections of stories, which include Really, Really, Really, Really, Weird Stories and the Bram-Stoker-award winning collection Black Butterflies and Living Shadows. His newest novels are the urban fantasy Bleak History and the cyberpunk thriller Black Glass. He's also written John Constantine: Hellblazer-War Lord, John Constantine: ean, and The Other End. Also a television and movie scripter, Shirley was co-screenwriter of The.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on February 1, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Stu Cole is struggling to keep his nightclub, Club Anesthesia, afloat in the face of mob harassment when he's visited by a manifestation of the city of San Francisco, crystallized into a single enigmatic being. This amoral superhero leads him on a terrifying journey through the rock and roll demimonde as they struggle to save the city.

olgasmile
City Come a Walkin' should be a neoliberal nightmare. The big banks, run by the mob, have displaced the government in the United States (no other country is mentioned). Digital credit, manipulated by the banks, has superseded money, which is all but banned. The final usurpation of power and the consolidation of a new criminal cartel is being plotted by mob bosses in the major cities of the nation. The corporatized criminals - the Mafioso-bankers - work in clandestine conjunction with culturally right-wing vigilantes, who brutally repress alternative forms of popular expression from pop concerts to prostitution. (Sound familiar?) Cities and their populations have been ravaged by the mob and their fascist conspirators. The venal destruction of the rich historic urban texture of the old is brilliantly contrasted to the enervating banality of the new.

Those who love urban life and who constitute its originality are represented in the novel respectively by Stu Cole, a hard-bitten classic noir individualist and club owner and his star performer Catz Wailen. Both use their particular geniuses to resist the irresistible cultural depredations of the mob. The most memorable character of the novel is, however, City. City is the reified psyche of San Francisco's population, the personification the city's communal angst. It is the city come to life. City, manifesting himself to Cole on a television explains himself: "A TV is a media outlet for the city. A neuron in my brain. The means I use to transfer the image from video to electron-patterns, bring it through the wires and feed it into you TV--it's a form of telekinesis. Manipulating electronics with thought. At night I have the power in every cerebral battery in the city. A brain stores electricity. I can tap in, when they sleep. During the day I have only the power of those who sleep in the day--far fewer, so I am limited. Though I'm bolstered by people watching TV, since that's a form of sleeping. I'm the sum total of the unconscious cognition of every brain in the city. And I'm Rufe Roscoe [the mob's CEO], too--I'm his self-hatred." (58)

The human characters of the novel are moral creatures: the protagonists are moral, the villain is immoral. In contrast, City, like the population from which he draws his life, is amoral. He acts, often savagely and indiscriminately, only in his own interests, in defense of the creative diversity that sustains urban life. Shirley's story is compelling not because of the plot and only partially because of the pace and grittiness of his writing. It is powerful because of its uncanny evocation of the dangers that affect the cities we love to inhabit.
LadyShlak
Literally! What a book. In itself it's not scary - but its implications are terrorizing. William Gibson wrote the Forward in the edition I read - acknowledging Shirley's primary influence on cyberpunk. This is an early book of his, but while some of the writing is rough, the thoughts he puts to paper are powerful.

Other reviews will tell you about the book (the Amazon description is horrible). There are three main characters. The interaction and flow among them is very fascinating. I couldn't wait for the book to end so I could know how Shirley tied up the loose ends; I didn't want the book to end because I was having so much fun.

If you enjoy reflecting on a book after you have read it, then this is a very good catalyst. I heartily recommend it.
Goldcrusher
Grab this book, sink into it. I don’t usually say stuff like this, but, “Whoa!”
Damand
In a nutshell, the plot can be summed up as follows: The Mafia conspires to take over San Francisco. The citizen's collective unconscious, as embodied in City, fights back.

While the plot and prose can be awkward in places, the concepts, and how they are explored, kept me strongly interested. The work is also permeated with little details that give it a distinct cyberpunk atmosphere. This can be fascinating in its own right in light of later works in the genre.
Hrguig
Thx!
salivan
If you know who Jack Hawksmoor of the Authority is, you will get some of the vibe here. San Francisco is making its own superheroes, to help combat corruption, takeover and neglect of its internal systems, and organised crime control of finance. However, it needs assistants, and ends up possessing those bodies, with their physical forms being destroyed.

Other cities are on a similar path, by the end, without the superhero manifestations. This is superhero in the Authority sense, too.

The protagonist is an aging music club owner, deeply in debt to his mob, who, of course, has a thing for the singer in one of his support acts. The problem is, that City does not trust her.
Ral
Shirley's early novel "City Come A Walkin'" takes us on a surreal (and frequently brutal) jaunt through a near-future San Fransisco where the city's overmind has the ability to manifest as a mirrorshades-wearing techno-shaman with a marked dislike for bad guys. The brilliance and terror behind this straight-forward tale is Shirley's refreshing refusal to cling to genre conceits. "City Come A Walkin'" challenges the nature of identity as well as the parameters of urban morality.
This book is definitely an important one as the forward by William Gibson indicates. Still, there is much left to be wanting. Looking back I remember being basically floored by the first fifty pages, and then subsequently let down for the majority of the rest of the book. The main character is hard to like and not in an anti-hero sort of way. I think this probably hints at John Shirley's true talent lying in his short story writing abilities. If I could do it again I would probably try to find some of those first, but overall this one is worth checking out.