» » Outies (Mote Series, Book 3)

Download Outies (Mote Series, Book 3) fb2

by J. R. Pournelle
Download Outies (Mote Series, Book 3) fb2
Science Fiction
  • Author:
    J. R. Pournelle
  • ISBN:
    0615434142
  • ISBN13:
    978-0615434148
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    New Brookland Press; 1st edition (March 30, 2011)
  • Pages:
    400 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Science Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1549 kb
  • ePUB format
    1592 kb
  • DJVU format
    1747 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    640
  • Formats:
    mobi txt mobi docx


This book is not about belly buttons. Although there wasn't a lot of story line in the two novels about this third group, .

This book is not about belly buttons. In 1974 Jerry Pournelle published a book titled "The Mote in God's Eye" with an assist from Larry Niven. Then in 1993 the two combined on a sequel titled "The Gripping Hand". These were both hard science fiction novels about first contact with a species from the 'Mote'. Jennifer) Pournelle picked up where her father left off with this 2011 print regarding life on one of those worlds. A world that hasn't even drawn the interest of the Empire.

Mote Series (3 Book Series). by Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle, Jerry Pournelle, . While faithful to the premises of The Mote in God's Eye, Outies takes a fresh look at that universe from the fringes of the Second Empire of Ma. - - Larry Niven. With page turning action coupled to a stunning sense of place, Outies takes the notion of 'first cointact' to new levels.

Although there wasn't a lot of story line in the two novels about this third group, . Although in this version there are no space battles, the author does paint an exciting world full of mystery and suspense, including murder, kidnapping and political battles as the world makes an attempt at being accepted into the Empire.

Jennifer R. Pournelle is an archaeologist and anthropologist who reconstructs the landscapes that surrounded ancient cities. Her work in Turkey, Iraq, and the Caucasus has been featured in Science magazine, The New York Times, on The Discovery Channel, and on National Geographic Television. In a former life, she received numerous decorations for service as a United States Army officer and arms control negotiator, and directed reconstruction work in Iraq as a civilian.

Pournelle A continuation of "The Mote in God's Eye" series written by Jerry Pournelle's daughter, an archeologist sometimes seen on Nat Geo. You'll need to have read the first.

If you read this on a Kindle, before you start reading hit the Prior-Page button a whole bunch of times, until you get to the Cover Art; then, start paging forward. If you don't, you miss the maps and other important background material. The CHRONOLOGY was not formatted correctly for Kindle: Words in some of the paragraphs extended beyond the edge of the viewing screen on my device. A continuation of "The Mote in God's Eye" series written by Jerry Pournelle's daughter, an archeologist sometimes seen on Nat Geo. You'll need to have read the first two books to know the significance of the characters in this one.

Outies is an authorized sequel to The Mote in God's Eye and The Gripping Hand by best-selling SF duo Larry Niven . With a fresh point of view, deep continuity, and page-turning plot twists, .

Outies is an authorized sequel to The Mote in God's Eye and The Gripping Hand by best-selling SF duo Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. Outies is an authorized sequel to The Mote in God's Eye and The Gripping Hand by best-selling SF duo Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. Outies added 3 new photos to . .

with the purchase of any eligible product. Jennifer R. Her work in Turkey, Iraq, and the Caucasus has been featured in Science magazine, The New York Times, and on The Discovery Channel, PBS/NOVA, and National Geographic Television.

Pournelle - an ex-Army intelligence officer turned anthropologist - provides New Utah .

Pournelle - an ex-Army intelligence officer turned anthropologist - provides New Utah and its characters with a rich sense of place and deep motivations; hints at what may become, over the next millenium, of Mormons, moties, and Earth islanders displaced by sea level rise - and even masters some Tok Pisin along the wa. For those new to (or needing a refresher on) the Mote series, a detailed chronology lists key events over the five centuries preceding Outies.

Outies is an authorized sequel to The Mote in God's Eye and The Gripping Hand by best-selling SF duo Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. With a fresh point of view, deep continuity, and page-turning plot twists, J.R. (Jennifer) Pournelle brings a mature generation of Moties to life for a mature generation of readers. Outies introduces new characters, adds depth to beloved old ones, creates a rich, imaginable world, and gives clear voices to aliens and outsiders. In a return to the CoDominium universe of the Second Empire of Man, Outies pauses at the fringes of human space, on an outworld that never knew fossil fuels. New Utah instead pushed crude solar technologies to the limits of everyday utility. But a planet is a big place - and it's time for the New Utahns to meet the neighbors. Blending hard science and social science, Outies explores complexities of biology, geology, and ecology at the heart of alien Motie society and evolution. While military science fiction in a sense, that sense is very much of the wars of our time. Outies plunges through the confusion, chaos, factionalism, and unpredictability of low intensity conflict with realism, but largely through civilian eyes. In a twist on traditional space opera, it introduces Asach Quinn - a wily, thoughtful, genderless, and diplomatic foil to reckless pilot Kevin Renner. Leaving the aristocratic manors of Sparta, Quinn burrows deep inside the heads of members of the Church of Him - who believe that the red dwarf visible twinkling through the Coal Sack Nebula is literally the Eye of God. Pournelle - an ex-Army intelligence officer turned anthropologist - provides New Utah and its characters with a rich sense of place and deep motivations; hints at what may become, over the next millenium, of Mormons, moties, and Earth islanders displaced by sea level rise - and even masters some Tok Pisin along the way.At nearly 110,000 words (400 print pages), the book is packed with additional material designed to allow the reader to explore New Utah in as much depth as desired. For those new to (or needing a refresher on) the Mote series, a detailed chronology lists key events over the five centuries preceding Outies. The cast of characters is organized by role and location, providing hints of relationships that unwind over the course of the novel. A map lays out the continental-scale environs in which the story is set. An appendix provides a guide to acronyms, details of religious history and organization, an explanation of alien accounting systems, and evolutionary biology. There is even an original musical score, composed by music theorist J. Daniel Jenkins.

Oghmaghma
No. This book is not about belly buttons.

In 1974 Jerry Pournelle published a book titled "The Mote in God's Eye" with an assist from Larry Niven. Then in 1993 the two combined on a sequel titled "The Gripping Hand". These were both hard science fiction novels about first contact with a species from the 'Mote'. They were referred to as Moties. During both novels there was a third group. These were planets outside the Empire of Man. Outies.

Although there wasn't a lot of story line in the two novels about this third group, J.R. (Jennifer) Pournelle picked up where her father left off with this 2011 print regarding life on one of those worlds. A world that hasn't even drawn the interest of the Empire.

Although in this version there are no space battles, the author does paint an exciting world full of mystery and suspense, including murder, kidnapping and political battles as the world makes an attempt at being accepted into the Empire. The blockade enacted to keep the prolifically reproducing Moties out of Empire space is working. Or is it?
Goltigor
I was pleasantly surprised to find a new book set in Jerry Pournelle's Second Imperium setting, written by his daughter Jennifer. It is a great story, following up on occurrences from the early pages of the Niven/Pournelle "The Gripping Hand" and referencing events in "King David's Spaceship." On the one hand, the story and characters are well developed, although readers of "A Mote in God's Eye" and "The Gripping Hand" should be warned that favorite characters like Sir Kevin Renner and Lord Blaine are just supporting cast in this novel. The novel adds intriguing twists to the history of the Moties and the Trans-Coalsack sector, as well as a more in-depth look at the Church of Him referred to in previous novels and a deeper probe into the politics of the Second Imperium. I thoroughly enjoyed it, and stayed up much too late to finish reading it. On the other hand, there are occasional sections that seem to be inconsistent with the history of the other books. On the gripping hand, a little thought into the story she constructs resolves much of the inconsistency, or at least leads to a realization that the Trans-Coalsack Sector is a much more complex entity than revealed in earlier books.
godlike
Pros:

1) An excellent first contact story. I suppose it's not a spoiler to acknowledge that the Moties appear in this, the third of the 'Mote in God's Eye' novels. The aliens are well-realized, and their portrayal is the high point of the novel, on par or better than the earlier novels. The insight into their psychology is unique to the series, and the actions both of humans and Moties in the course of the novel is both logical and well-realized.

2) Related to the above note is that this is most obviously hard SF, of a sort that is all too rare. There are no universal translators. Such technology as is used is plausible. The author deserves commendation for Doing Her Research.

3) The story successfully gives a feeling of adventure, of dusty duty stations and the challenges of running an NGO or academic endeavour on the SF equivalent of the third world.

Cons:

1) The single largest complaint I have is weak characterization. The characters are atomic, and have little interaction or relationship to each other beyond those strictly necessary to carry out action in the story. The Bury-Renner relationship of the second book, the Whitbread-Potter-Staley triangle of the first, the enmity between Dr. Horvath and Admiral Kutuzov, are all missing. Nor is there much to distinguish them or to make them memorable beyond their story role.

2) A possible concern is that the novel is somewhat academic in tone. There is lengthy exposition, to the extent of inserting entire fictional documents verbatim into the text. There are numerous walls of text to trudge through. This coupled with some rather unusual five-syllable word choices limit the mass-market appeal of the book.

3) Related to the above is a concern that there is too much exposition and not enough *action*. A novel like Gripping Hand starts the action fairly quickly and keeps you on the edge of your seat for approximately 2/3rds of the book. "Outies" takes more than half the book to begin its action, and it is quickly over. Nor, once events start to occur, is there much doubt of the outcome. So I cannot in good conscience say I "couldn't put the book down".

The Bottom Line: This book is of interest if you are a fan either of hard SF or of the Motie universe. However, I cannot recommend it for the general market or as an entry-level book for the series. For all that it is an interesting read, and I hope the author hones her craft by publishing additional novels.
Shalizel
The author has very obviously spent time downrange; the military and paramilitary material rings dead-bang true, and she convincingly conveys the tense feel of life in a Third World failed state as it slides into the sinkhole of armed implosion. She very accurately depicts the mindset of the self-righteous, holier-than-thou, unwashed beardy nutters and their never ending game of 'My God's Better Than Your God', and the debilitating, soul-crushing, often fatal effect it has on the unfortunates caught up in its wake.

The story itself? There are no plot holes or continuity issues; it dovetails very neatly into the universe established in 'The Mote In God's Eye' and 'The Gripping Hand'. Mechanically, it is very well crafted and well edited - there are perhaps half-a-dozen homophone issues, and that's just about it.

Several of the main characters from the previous books get passing mention or make what are not much more than walk-on appearances; several others do get somewhat more face time.

The author introduces some new main characters, all of whom are well drawn and nicely developed.

There are also a number of unanswered questions - I certainly hope that there'll be another book to address them.

Short version: This is good. If you liked 'The Mote In God's Eye' and 'The Gripping Hand' you'll like 'Outies' as well.