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by Charles Platt
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Science Fiction
  • Author:
    Charles Platt
  • ISBN:
    0553289500
  • ISBN13:
    978-0553289503
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Spectra; First Edition edition (February 1, 1991)
  • Subcategory:
    Science Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1935 kb
  • ePUB format
    1402 kb
  • DJVU format
    1136 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    301
  • Formats:
    lit mbr mbr azw


In "The Silicon Man," Charles Platt aims at providing a technically plausible approach to uploading.

In "The Silicon Man," Charles Platt aims at providing a technically plausible approach to uploading. The plot, such as it is, involves an FBI agent who, while investigating illegal trafficking in a special kind of gun, stumbles upon a group of scientists working on a publicly-funded project thought to have been a money sink, but which has actually succeeded beyond the wildest dreams.

Platt's novel The Silicon Man has been endorsed by William Gibson as "A plausible, well-crafted .

Platt's novel The Silicon Man has been endorsed by William Gibson as "A plausible, well-crafted narrative exploring cyberspace in a wholly new and very refreshing way". As a fiction writer, Charles Platt has also used pseudonyms: Aston Cantwell (1983), Robert Clarke (Less Than Human, a science-fiction comedy of 1986) and Charlotte Prentiss (historical and prehistory novels, between 1981 and 1999).

The Silicon Man book. Charles Platt (born in London, England, 1945) is the author of 41 fiction and nonfiction books, including science-fiction novels such as The Silicon Man and Protektor (published in paperback by Avon Books). He has also written non-fiction, particularly on the subjects of computer technology and cryonics, as well as teaching and working in these fields.

Platt pushes the science and technology reasonably far, but the concept still seems a little unbelievable. As for the book itself, it has it's moments. For a 1991 work of fiction some of the ideas were pretty good at the time (but now dated

Platt pushes the science and technology reasonably far, but the concept still seems a little unbelievable. Happily, that doesn't detract from the novel, which I finished in basically one sitting. For a 1991 work of fiction some of the ideas were pretty good at the time (but now dated. Platt, the author, has thought a lot about the details of how to upload a mind into a computer, and some of the moral and philosophical implications of it. The end was an interesting twist, which was good to see. But I really had a bit of an issue with the writing style itself.

The Silicon Man tells an intensely human, suspenseful story showing how it may be done, sooner rather than later. Nominated for the John W. Campbell award and the Philip K. Dick award.

Charles Platt - The Silicon Man/maphis. Charles Platt - The Silicon Man/Platt,Charles The Silicon Man. rtf The Silicon Man CHARLES PLATT. Bantam books new york, toronto, london, sydney, auckland. THE SILICON MAN A Bantam Spectra Book, March 1991 SPECTRA and the portrayal of a boxed "s" are trademarks of Bantam Books, a division of Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

The Silicon Man. (1991) (A book in the Cortext series) A novel by Charles Platt. Awards Prometheus Award Best Novel (nominee) John W Campbell Memorial Award Best Novel (nominee). A science fiction novel about a team of renegade scientists working on a project to download human intelligence into a vast array of computer memory, but an FBI agent senses something sinister. Genre: Science Fiction. Similar books by other authors. Platt charles.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. The silicon man. 314 Kb.

The Silicon Man & Protektor Paperback – 5 May 2015. by Charles Platt (Author). Can human intelligence thrive in computer hardware The Silicon Man tells an intensely human, suspenseful story showing how it may be done. William Gibson praised it as a plausible, well-crafted narrative exploring cyberspace in a wholly new and very refreshing way. The Washington Post described it as a well-plotted, fast-paced, and imaginative look into the future. a book where ideas drive the plot. Above all, Platt's work is full of surprises.

Very Interesting Book

Maman
Can you live forever by electronically replicating your brain in the form of a computer program? "Uploading," as the concept is sometimes referred to, has been around in science fiction for a long time: variations of it were kicked around in episodes of the old Star Trek ("What Are Little Girls Made Of?", "I, Mudd" and "Return to Tomorrow", among others), The X-Files ("Kill Switch"), and so on.
In "The Silicon Man," Charles Platt aims at providing a technically plausible approach to uploading. The plot, such as it is, involves an FBI agent who, while investigating illegal trafficking in a special kind of gun, stumbles upon a group of scientists working on a publicly-funded project thought to have been a money sink, but which has actually succeeded beyond the wildest dreams. The scientists have to get rid of the FBI agent, but they can't quite bring themselves to kill him, so they copy his mind and put him in their electronic universe -- which is kind of like the Matrix (from the movie), though without any of the bells and whistles. Instead of Agents (the computer programs in "The Matrix") to torment our hero, however, there's the main computer scientists, who is a megalomaniac with the power to alter the computer environment as he sees fit. Yikes!
Platt pushes the science and technology reasonably far, but the concept still seems a little unbelievable. Happily, that doesn't detract from the novel, which I finished in basically one sitting.
black coffe
I totally loved this book. I couldn't put it down. I loved the 5 digit area codes. A must read for any sci-fi reader.
Dagdalas
I had an uneasy feeling about this book when I read the introduction. This book (published here in 1997) is part of a series of Wired Books (from Wired Magazine) that changed the world. That's a tall order. The other books in the series have the same self-inflated sense of self worth. (The other books aren't so bad, it's just that they aren't exactly Nobel Prize level fiction.) But the thing that made me feel uneasy is that compared to the other books which are slightly better known, the author is also a contributor to Wired magazine, which smells just a bit incestuous.

As for the book itself, it has it's moments. For a 1991 work of fiction some of the ideas were pretty good at the time (but now dated.) Platt, the author, has thought a lot about the details of how to upload a mind into a computer, and some of the moral and philosophical implications of it. The end was an interesting twist, which was good to see. But I really had a bit of an issue with the writing style itself. It just wasn't so dynamic. It read more like a perfect textbook example of how to write a novel. Some pieces of the plot seemed somewhat a little to convenient. Characters were introduced the same way each time and after a while a few of them were a little two dimensional for my liking. The character I like the most was Dr Gottbaum's daughter Yumi, but she only figures in part of the book. But we never really get into some of the motivations, side thoughts or neuroses of some of the characters (but it's all we see of the others.)

I picked up the book in a discount bin at a discount book store, so I thought it was okay for what I paid for it. And I'm a sucker for a shiny cover.