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by Robert A. Heinlein
Download Job: A Comedy of Justice fb2
Science Fiction
  • Author:
    Robert A. Heinlein
  • ISBN:
    0345316495
  • ISBN13:
    978-0345316493
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Ballantine Books; 1st edition (August 1, 1984)
  • Pages:
    376 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Science Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1911 kb
  • ePUB format
    1482 kb
  • DJVU format
    1824 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    849
  • Formats:
    docx txt mobi lit


Job: A Comedy of Justice is a novel by Robert A. Heinlein published in 1984. The title is a reference to the biblical Book of Job and James Branch Cabell's book Jurgen, A Comedy of Justice.

Job: A Comedy of Justice is a novel by Robert A. It won the Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel in 1985 and was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1984, and the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1985

Job: a comedy of justice. The number of the beast. Published by The Random House Publishing Group.

Job: a comedy of justice. Published in the United States by Del Rey Books, an imprint of The Random House Publishing Group, a division of Random House, In. New York, and simultaneously in Canada by Random House of Canada Limited, Toronto. Del Rey is a registered trademark and the Del Rey colophon is a trademark of Random House, Inc. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 84-3091.

This book has been much more influential than has been impressed. I've heard quotes from this book, and the theme of jumping from universe to universe has been used in a multitude of hollywood television programs. I usually don't like book titles with a colon in them, but in Heinlein's case, it's an apt title. There's a strong sense here that Heinlein is responding to all the criticisms of his past novels.

Heinlein delves into religion in this book. Robert Anson Heinlein was born on July 7, 1907 in Butler, Mo. The son of Rex Ivar and Bam Lyle Heinlein, Robert Heinlein had two older brothers, one younger brother, and three younger sisters

Heinlein delves into religion in this book. Alexander Hergensheimer is a fundamentalist minister but then everything changed and he is supposed to be Alec Graham, an underworld figure. The son of Rex Ivar and Bam Lyle Heinlein, Robert Heinlein had two older brothers, one younger brother, and three younger sisters. Moving to Kansas City, M. at a young age, Heinlein graduated from Central High School in 1924 and attended one year of college at Kansas City Community College. Following in his older brother's footsteps, Heinlein entered the Navel Academy in 1925.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Job: A Comedy of Justice as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Аудиокнига "Job: A Comedy of Justice", Robert A. Heinlein. Читает Paul Michael Garcia. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

Job: A Comedy of Justice. by Robert A. Robert A. Heinlein, the dean of American SF writers, also wrote fantasy fiction throughout his long career, but especially in the early 1940s. The Golden Age of SF was also a time of revolution in fantasy fiction, and Heinlein was at the forefront. His fa. The Man Who Sold the Moon.

Job 23:8-10 Margrethe said, What did you do with the soap?. I took a deep breath, sighed it out. Did I hear you correctly? You’re asking what I did with the soap? said?. A miracle takes plac. nd you ask me about a bar of soap. Alec, a miracle that takes place again and again and again is no longer a miracle; it’s just a nuisance. I want to scream or break into tears. So I asked about the soap.

On vacation in Polynesia, Alex Hergensheimer experiences a series of world-changes, all of which point to Armageddon and reveal him to be a pawn in the ancient feud between God and Lucifer

Monam
SPOILERS

Well, here's the thing, this is a Heinlein novel written after his trans ischemic attack. He did get weird (weirder?) about sex after that incident and every fan knows it can be difficult to read his later works (unless that is your kind of thing.) Still this one is much gentler about that than To Sail Beyond the Sunset, or The Number of the Beast.

Now...

Well, here's the thing, this is a Heinlein novel written after his trans ischemic attack. He did get weird (weirder?) about religion after that incident and every fan knows it can be difficult to read his later works (unless that is your kind of thing.) Still this one is much LESS GENTLE about that than The Number of the Beast, or Stranger in a Strange Land.

The narrator of the novel is a hypocrite, a preacher who has turned into a self-satisfied professional religious fundraiser who knows the money he raises does no good for anyone at all. He's okay with that since he knows he was a mediocre preacher. Many Heinlein novels feature rapid transition from world to world, by time machine, by space ship, et cetera. This time the transition is "by religion." The narrator and his so-perfect-she-might-as-well-be-a-robot mistress (aka another incarnation of Ginny) are flung through a number of weird situations that force them to become menial workers in a series of alternate Americas while trying to get to Kansas. (There's never a tornado around when you want one.) Then the Rapture comes and he is taken up. He even becomes a Saint with some CPO type status in a Heaven organized like the US Military. (Anyone who reads Heinlein will recognize this setting.) Then he gets himself kicked out because his mistress isn't in Heaven after all. Hell turns out to be a nicer place with better climate and society. (This isn't a surprise either, is it?) And Satan is a lot more helpful than the angels who didn't fall.

NOBODY unfamiliar with Heinlein will be the least surprised by this book's world view. And it was written by a lazy Heinlein who didn't feel like even pretending to use his slide rule for us. Actually, he may have used what he learned writing science fiction for fifty years to write something like Biblical fiction! The book may also have been a gift to the many Pagan friends we know he acquired through the years. Go Odin-eers! But it still contains an unusual adventure. I wanted to read it again after some thirty years, but I can't see picking it up again in thirty years more. It's fiction. Heavy on the religious arguments. Perhaps lacking in sympathetic characters. You won't really like Alec, you won't really believe Marga. St. Peter is a good guy who keeps Coca-Cola on ice in Heaven. The Satan in this book is a Texan car salesman! Really! But. JOB is NOT science fiction. Glory Road was better SF (and a better book) by a long shot, and it barely qualifies as SF. If you're a thinker, this won't challenge your views on religion. If you're easily offended, then it might offend them. (I don't think many seriously Christian SF readers get this far into the RAH catalog, anyway.)

Bob was showing off his sharp memories of his boyhood indoctrination in the Old Time Religion. There's a lot of simultaneous Bible-bashing and Bible-quoting. Bob was digging into the hypocrites who use religion to make money. Bob was happy to talk in depth, now and then, about long-legged Odin-worshipping pagan blondes. Now that's a thing we've always known he liked to think about. Bob was like Mark Twain, saying, "I'll take Heaven for Climate and Hell For Society." The narrator like Adam says paradise is where Eve is, whether the sweat on the brow comes from digging furrows or washing dishes. It's nice that RAH believed in true love but he didn't portray it believably in JOB.
Xangeo
This book has been much more influential than has been impressed. I've heard quotes from this book, and the theme of jumping from universe to universe has been used in a multitude of hollywood television programs. I usually don't like book titles with a colon in them, but in Heinlein's case, it's an apt title.

There's a strong sense here that Heinlein is responding to all the criticisms of his past novels. Friday had too sexy and too sexually liberated of a protagonist and too off-handedly spurned religion, now in JOB the protagonist is a rather sedate in temperance and sexual experience and is a religious reverend to boot. Past books had too much pontificating cited by critics, here the protagonist learns from other people. Past characters were rich and lived cushy lives, here the protagonist is thrown literally universe to universe where he has to be out among `the people' and live and rely upon them first hand. It's as if Heinlein is parodying all his numerous critics and saying, `what!, you don't think I can write about that' and that if he wants to write about something, he'll write it. This is perhaps the most mature work of his I've read since Moon is a Harsh Mistress. It starts out a bit slower, is not as exciting or fun as let's say Friday, but in the end more meaningful.

As you may have ascertained, this is a novel with a heavy religious bent. It's a present day version of the Book of Job in the Bible. However, it's probably more for those that aren't especially religious, especially for those that may groan and roll their eyes at the mention of religion. For Heinlein isn't trying to shove religion down your throat, in fact it's the opposite, he's criticizing heavily some of the aspects of religion, especially the trials and tribulations of Job. What kind of God is it that would put all these tasks before people to be able to get into heaven, in the worst case being Job, where God allows Satan to make Job's life absolutely horribly miserable over a lousy bet. And towards the end, in what I think is a respectable way, the question of that wisdom is put to trial is a way, with there being different levels of omnipotence and omniscience. This section is the most powerful part of this book.

This novel was one of the six finalists for the 1984 Nebula Award and one of five finalists for the 1985 Hugo Award. Heinlein wrote a few more books before his death in 1988, but this was the last novel to be a nominee finalist for either award. At first, one might think that it may be due to sentimentality for the famous Heinlein, while in actuality this novel shows why he's such a well known, well read author and awarded the title of Grand Master.

JOB: A Comedy of Justice, published 1984, 439 pages, four full stars.