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by Dani Kollin
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Science Fiction
  • Author:
    Dani Kollin
  • ISBN:
    0765331101
  • ISBN13:
    978-0765331106
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Tor Books; Reprint edition (April 26, 2011)
  • Pages:
    464 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Science Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1513 kb
  • ePUB format
    1717 kb
  • DJVU format
    1103 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    370
  • Formats:
    lrf lrf docx mobi


The Unincorporated Man is a science fiction novel by Dani Kollin and Eytan Kollin, published in 2009. This work is their first novel of four. The Unincorporated Man is a nomic novel that takes place in a utopian/dystopian future,.

The Unincorporated Man is a science fiction novel by Dani Kollin and Eytan Kollin, published in 2009. The Unincorporated Man is a nomic novel that takes place in a utopian/dystopian future, after civilization has fallen into complete economic collapse and been revived

The Unincorporated Man book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Unincorporated Man (Unincorporated Man as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Unincorporated Man book.

Unincorporated Man Series. 4 primary works, 4 total works. Book 2. The Unincorporated War. by Dani Kollin. Book 1. The Unincorporated Man. The Unincorporated Man is a provocativ. ore. Shelve The Unincorporated Man. Want to Read. The Kollin brothers introduced their futur. Shelve The Unincorporated War.

Library Journal on The Unincorporated War. The Kollins's masterful command of multiple plot threads, characters . The Kollins's masterful command of multiple plot threads, characters, and the motifs of grand-scale space opera make for a breathtaking sequel. In the second book, Dani and Eytan continue their tradition of lengthy thoughtful prose, but it is anything but thought provoking, adds little to the story, and in fact, might force you to skip a few paragraphs to get back to the story. Where the plot in the first book was about discovery, imaginative economics and how culture affects and is affected by technology, the second book turns into a very boring action drama.

Read online books written by Kollin, Dani in our e-reader absolutely for free. Books by Kollin, Dani: The Unincorporated Man. Author of The Unincorporated Man, The Unincorporated War at ReadAnyBook.

The Unincorporated War book. Unfortunately, Dani and Eytan Kollin (brothers) lost some of the momentum of The Unincorporated Man and have stretched the suspension of disbelief almost to the breaking point in the sequel.

Электронная книга "The Unincorporated War", Dani Kollin, Eytan Kollin. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Unincorporated War" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The Kollin brothers introduced their future world, and central character Justin Cord, in The Unincorporated Ma. Filled with battles, betrayals, and triumphs, The Unincorporated War is a full-scale space opera that catapults the focus of the earlier novel up and out into the solar system.

The Kollin brothers introduced their future world, and central character Justin Cord, in The Unincorporated Man. Justin created a revolution in that book, and is now exiled from Earth to the outer planets, where he is a heroic figure. Justin remains both a logical and passionate fighter for the principles that motivate him, and the most dangerous man alive.

Sandra O’Toole is the president of the Outer Alliance, which stretches from the asteroid belt to the Oort Cloud beyond Pluto. Resurrected following the death of Justin Cord, the unincorporated man, O’Toole has become a powerful political figure and a Machiavellian leader determined to win the Civil War against the inner planets at almost any cost. And the war has been going badly, in part because of the great General Trang, a fit opponent for the brilliant J. D. Black. Choices have to be made to abandon some of the moral principles upon which the revolution was founded

The Kollin brothers introduced their future world, and central character Justin Cord, in The Unincorporated Man. Justin created a revolution in that book, and is now exiled from Earth to the outer planets, where he is an heroic figure

The Kollin brothers introduced their future world, and central character Justin Cord, in The Unincorporated Man. Justin created a revolution in that book, and is now exiled from Earth to the outer planets, where he is an heroic figure. The corporate society which is headquartered on Earth and rules Venus, Mars, and the Orbital colonies, wants to destroy Justin and reclaim hegemony over the rebellious outer planets. The first interplanetary civil war begins as the military fleet of Earth attacks

The Kollin brothers introduced their future world, and central character Justin Cord, in The Unincorporated Man. Justin created a revolution in that book, and is now exiled from Earth to the outer planets, where he is a heroic figure. Corporate society, which is headquartered on Earth and rules Venus, Mars, and the orbital colonies, wants to destroy Justin and reclaim hegemony over the outer planets. The first interplanetary war begins as the military fleet of Earth attacks.

Filled with battles, betrayals, and triumphs, The Unincorporated War is a full-scale space opera that catapults the focus of the earlier novel into the solar system. Justin remains both a logical and passionate fighter for the principles that motivate him, and the most dangerous man alive.

The first novel in this thought-provoking series, The Unincorporated Man, won the 2009 Prometheus Award for best novel.


Tamesya
I really wanted to like this book. The premise of the entire series- a future where individual incorporation has developed into a system of slavery- was very interesting, and not an idea I'd seen before. Unfortunately, the style of this book is just awful, especially when compared to the likes of Peter Hamilton (yes, that's bias, and his books did have their own problems, but still). Anyway, I'll try to be concise when summing up my opinions about the book:

-The authors didn't seem to know where they wanted to take their ideas. It starts off fairly well, with large fleet actions, politics, and the conflicting opinions concerning incorporation, but a lot of that disappears. By the end of the book, the giant fleet battles (which, mind you, have gone from twenty ships to hundreds) are not even described, the idealogical opposition of the two sides has been reduced to "The Alliance has religion!" and "The UHS brainwashed a few people! Oh, and incorporation is evil, even though most of us still don't understand why!".
-The entire subplot concerning the avatars was excruciatingly pointless. The entirety of its purpose can be summed up in the sentence "These super intelligent, extremely resourceful, and somewhat-immortal AI's are really not so different from humans". Go figure.
-The reintroduction of religion seemed kind of unnecessary.
-As mentioned earlier, I just couldn't get into the writing style. To be honest, I felt it was a little immature (in a way that's difficult to express), but what do I know?
-Total lack of character development. Cord never changes, Neela's "development" is lazy and inexplicable, especially her relationship with the President; Omad, who was a miner in the first book, turns out to have all the qualities of a an incredible fleet officer; JD ALSO turns out to be an incredible admiral without any logical explanation; and Hektor also hasn't changed at all.
-Characters randomly disappear and reappear, with no apparent reason for their existence: Michael the reporter and Irma Sabblage come to mind. Plus all the mindless interactions between sub-characters (such as Al's interaction with the woman in VR) that have no import whatsoever on anything else happening in the book.
-And worst of all, the interesting "news segments", or text that introduced new chapters in the first book almost totally disappear by the end of the second. Besides a brief cameo at the ending, which suggests that the writers realized they'd forgotten them and felt obligated to throw them back in, the pieces become increasingly sparse as the book progresses. And they were a really nice idea.

Sorry for the wall, but to put it in (very) short: the book's greatest strength is its premise, which is woefully mishandled. Perhaps when the authors are more experienced, their writing will be of a higher quality, but what we're left with is a fairly disappointing read that under-delivers a great concept. 2/5
FreandlyMan
As a book by itself perhaps I would give it a higher rating. But this is a sequel. What happened? The unincorporated man was so good. This is nothing like the first book. Where is Justin Cord? It is full of military battles that are fairly well written but it does not fit with the first book. How does a trial attorney become the grand admiral? Not realistic. The Neuro war is interesting. I really wanted to love this book but the cognitive dissonance of this as a sequel left me wanting more. About 100 pages easily could have been removed. It did not seem to be written by the same authors.
Samardenob
A poor sequel, everything that was worth reading in the Unincorporated Man has almost been completely eliminated in the Unincorporated War. The first book, UM, was mind blowing, not so much in the Rip Van Winkle aspect as much as the world building in terms of future economics and also as a cultural commentary on how society might evolve as it is affected by evolving technology. This isn't a review of the first book, but it is worth mentioning because the intriguing part of UM is completely missing in the second.

Some reviewers complain about the heavy narration in the first book, the lengthy monologues that seem to bring the action to a dead stop, but if you are interested in human nature and its response to the will of society at large, those lengthy parts are not intrusions but add to the story. In the second book, Dani and Eytan continue their tradition of lengthy thoughtful prose, but it is anything but thought provoking, adds little to the story, and in fact, might force you to skip a few paragraphs to get back to the story.

Where the plot in the first book was about discovery, imaginative economics and how culture affects and is affected by technology, the second book turns into a very boring action drama. The main protagonist, Justin Cord, has been painted into a flawless hero type, who seems to know exactly what to say and when to say it, and all of his friends or colleagues seem completely subdued by his will, whether they agree with it or not. Where there should be drama, there is none. There is stale human reaction to Justin's actions and words. So when there is a moment where we see him unhinge, in a manner of speaking, at a universal religious festival, it seems weird and out of place. There is no buildup and the scene is so strange, you want to forget what happened except to see how it might play into his later decisions.

It is as if the brothers tried to write a dramatic action story but could not help themselves in constructing intellectual hypotheses that went nowhere for the most part. There is also way too much action, barely a step above the kind of regurgitated action scenes which most Star Wars novels seem to be made of these days.

I am near the end of this second book, and it is finally getting more and more interesting. The brothers excel at building a deep plot and supporting it with complex reasons, and the most interesting part of the story, the avatars and their war alongside the humans, is starting to coalesce as they find reasons to interfere or not interfere all the while dealing with impossible attacks from perverted beings of their own kind (reminiscent of LOTR orcs), and finally a creature so horrible, you might want to cringe as you imagine dying by its hands - or mist if you will.

I was most disappointed in Justin's girlfriend, Neela, not playing a more pivotal role, and how she seems to remain under the influence of high tech brainwashing while Justin does nothing. The idea is he can't do anything to save her, but it makes for a boring and aggravating plot point because this problem is never resolved throughout the length of the book (maybe in the last few pages I haven't read yet?). But then this might also be the natural flow of the brother's story telling style, she is there and breathing, and so she shows up in the scenes naturally, but whatever happens to her, just like in real life, will happen some other day.

All in all, a boring book which does not live up to the concept the series is based upon. I highly doubt I will read the third book, and I wouldn't pay much for it if I do. I am only reading the second book to see what happens with the characters I came to know so well in the first book. I almost didn't finish it, I got about a third of the way in before I realized I wasn't enjoying it like I should have, and it was too long and boring.