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by David Brin,James John Bell,John Brunner
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Science Fiction
  • Author:
    David Brin,James John Bell,John Brunner
  • ISBN:
    1932100016
  • ISBN13:
    978-1932100013
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    BenBella Books; First Trade Paper Edition edition (June 1, 2003)
  • Pages:
    352 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Science Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1772 kb
  • ePUB format
    1717 kb
  • DJVU format
    1509 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    594
  • Formats:
    lrf txt mobi docx


The Sheep Look Up is a science fiction novel by British author John Brunner, first published in 1972. The novel's setting is decidedly dystopian; the book deals with the deterioration of the environment in the United States

The Sheep Look Up is a science fiction novel by British author John Brunner, first published in 1972. The novel's setting is decidedly dystopian; the book deals with the deterioration of the environment in the United States. It was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1972 and is celebrated in a 1988 essay by John Skipp in Horror: 100 Best Books

Home John Brunner The Sheep Look U. This is a work of fiction. All the characters and events portrayed in this book are fictional, and any resemblance to real people or incidents is purely coincidental. eISBN: 978-1-61756-962-3

Home John Brunner The Sheep Look Up. Home. The sheep look up, . eISBN: 978-1-61756-962-3.

John Brunner (Author), David Brin (Introduction), James John Bell (Afterword) & 0 more. Would recommend this to fans of dystopian fiction, especially because it's a unique take

John Brunner (Author), David Brin (Introduction), James John Bell (Afterword) & 0 more. Would recommend this to fans of dystopian fiction, especially because it's a unique take. The Sheep Look Up doesn't have the overbearing government of 1984, the blatant censorship of Fahrenheit 451, the issues of The Handmaid's Tale, or the flawed yet pristine setting of Brave New World. 2 people found this helpful.

The Sheep Look Up book. James John Bell (Afterword). Stand on Zanzibar and The Sheep Look Up were two of my favourite books at university, and the covers even appear in my Master's Thesis. David Brin (Goodreads Author) (Introduction). Brunner wrote a few truly awful sci-fi books, and then "something happened" and he wrote these two masterpieces.

by John Brunner · James John Bell · David Brin. The Squares of the City is a science fiction novel written by John Brunner and fi. After the King: Stories in Honor of .

Henry David Thoreau.

My published writing includes the afterword to the eco-sci-fi classic "The Sheep Look Up" by John Brunner, and contributions to books on the social significance of virtual-world gaming "The Battle for Azeroth - Adventure, Alliance and Addiction in the World of Warcraft" and the SyFy channel's Battlestar Galactica reboot in the book "So Say We All". Henry David Thoreau. Any hack can safely rail away at foreign powers beyond the sea; but a good writer is a critic of the society he lives i. - Ed Abbey.

Mid fume and reekThat caused unmanly Tears to lave my cheek,Black-vis’d as Moors from soil, and huge of thew,The Founders led me ever onward throughTh’ intolerable Mirk. d, and came a sudden gout of FireThat leach’d the precious Water from my corseAnd strain’d my Vision with such awful forceIt seem’d I oped my eyes to tropic SunOr lightning riving Midnight’s dismal dun,Or stood amaz’d by mighty Hekla’s pi. marvel’d how Man, by his GOD-sent wit,Thus.

The Sheep Look Up is a science fiction novel by British author John Brunner, first published in 1972. It was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1972 and is celebrated in a 1988 essay by John Skipp in Horror: 100 Best Books. Brin places the book in the context of Brunner's time and other writings.

John Brunner: The Sheep Look Up, The Shockwave Rider, The Traveller in Black. What strikes me most strongly about The Sheep Look Up, billed as a 'sequel' to his big hit Stand on Zanzibar, is not its quaintness but its frightening accuracy.

An enduring classic, this book offers a dramatic and prophetic look at the potential consequences of the escalating destruction of Earth. In this nightmare society, air pollution is so bad that gas masks are commonplace. Infant mortality is up, and everyone seems to suffer from some form of ailment. The water is polluted, and only the poor drink from the tap. The government is ineffectual, and corporate interests scramble to make a profit from water purifiers, gas masks, and organic foods. Environmentalist Austin Train is on the run. The Trainites, environmental activists and sometime terrorists, want him to lead their movement. The government wants him in jail, or preferably, executed. The media wants a circus. Everyone has a plan for Train, but Train has a plan of his own. This suspenseful science fiction drama is now available to a new generation of enthusiasts. This replaces 0345347862.

Arador
Let me start by saying that I enjoyed this book. The fast-paced and unmerciful brutality of the story brings the horrible future to life in a frankly scary way. The choppy an abbreviated structure of the book provides a sense of panic as far too much is happening much too fast, just as Brunner intended. While the characters are empty shells, their horrifying experiences give this story the power to scare. This is the first Brunner book I've read, and I have to say I was impressed by his style and power. I hope to check out his other work sometime soon.

As I made my way through this book, most of what I felt was relief and amusement. Relief that this vision (or anything close to it) has not come true. Think about the very worst possible ecological and environmental situation the world could be in, and the vision Brunner presents here is probably worse than that. Air and water are poison, disease is the norm, Earth is unstable, super-pests have us confounded, and society has regressed. Thank God, none of these things have come true. I felt amusement because Brunner (and many people of the time) really did believe that this was the future. And, they saw this future coming before 1980! Almost 40 years after this book was written, it is fair to say that we have made positive progress. While I understand that the dawning of realization about ecology and environmentalism that occurred in the 60's and 70's profoundly impacted many people, I can't help feeling somewhat amused by the mortal fear and hysteria which people had for the future. Brunner and many of of his readers would have never believed that the world would be as beautiful today as it is.

What really surprised me was looking through the other Amazon reviews before I got ready to write my own. Nearly everyone seems to think Brunner's vision has come true or is just about to. Statements like:

"I think we're doomed"

"..much scarier because it is closer to the way it really is. Read it and weep."

"All of these ... visions of the future have come true."

"Scariest ... predictions about the future environment are correct."

"It is still coming"

Is it just that the people who tend to read this book are still convinced that the world is crumbling around them? Are these people who just cannot accept that positive gains have been made? Do they not believe that the air is cleaner now than when this book was written? Or that more attention and awareness of the environment are prevalent around the world than ever before? Or that resources and protections are being placed (with great success) on endangered animals that nearly went extinct in the 70's but are now on the road to recovery? Or that we now live in a more affluent society, with more people being more successful than ever before? Or any number of ways that life is better now than when this book was written? I suspect that most of these people have lived their lives with the constant feeling of impending doom. Reading books like this only help them justify their impulses of fear.

I am not trying to say that we shouldn't continue to be concerned about the environment or about the future of mankind on Earth, but at least let's acknowledge than in many respects, things are looking up. Thank God they haven't turned out the way Brunner predicted in this book! I encourage people to read this book. It is an exciting and scary story that is well told in a vivid way. And keep in mind that while it may come across as seeming ridiculous now, it was written as (and taken as) a very serious warning to the world. Might help give you some insight into the thinking of radical environmentalists even today. The future used to scare the [poop] out of some people, and visions like this help us see why.

The version of this book I read (published 2004) contained an afterward by a noted environmentalist. It followed along the same lines of most of the Amazon reviews here, supporting the myth that Brunner's vision has come true. It also celebrated the encouragement this book has given the more radical wings of the environmentalist movement (think planting bombs in Hummer dealerships), and gleefully noted the similarity (in his mind) between our former President Bush and the figurehead Prexy. Finally, it lambasted the field of crop genetic engineering with a fear mongering tirade sure to turn off anyone with real knowledge of the field. A poor choice for an afterward, left a very negative impression on me, and partially ruined this otherwise enjoyable book.
Najinn
Plot-wise this is a bit dated, because the book has a massive focus on pollution, which some countries are in the process of correcting. You can look at this another way, though: what if the world didn't uncover the concept of "green energy"? This is a good book in that sense. Lots of interesting thoughts and visuals. The main problem is that it's a tough read. It's disjointed with its scenes and characters, reading more like a short story collection than a true novel. There are also poems and fake commercials scattered throughout, along with ultra-short pieces (character interviews, conversations, quick events, and so on). So this is a good book to read, but I'm not sure I'd call it easy to get into. It can be enjoyable, it's just an unusual style which some people won't follow well. Lots of "slice of life" passages are peppered throughout The Sheep Look Up. Honestly this book is a bit of a slog to get through, particularly in the lengthy middle. Many parts are absolutely fascinating, though.

Another downside: The Kindle edition contains a significant amount of transcription errors, such as incorrect/missing punctuation in some chapters. I hope the physical editions of this book are better-made.

Would recommend this to fans of dystopian fiction, especially because it's a unique take. The Sheep Look Up doesn't have the overbearing government of 1984, the blatant censorship of Fahrenheit 451, the issues of The Handmaid's Tale, or the flawed yet pristine setting of Brave New World.
Windbearer
Near future sci fi novel hits pretty close to real life. A portrait of extremes, the consequences of disregarding the environment and the industries that pollute, agricultural catastrophes associated with pesticides, diseases adapting to antibiotics, issues associated with the disposal of toxic waste and the consequences of inept government oversight. Brunner foresaw all of it. Only a couple of nonexistent technologies: tanks that shoot lasers to quell the crowd and a microwave oven that leaked with results that were extremely and unlikely focused. Overall a very scary fable. All of the elements of failure of the government to act before it was too late are reminiscent of many things happening today. Rich and powerful valuing profits over the long term impacts to life on the planet and towards the earth itself. The public basically accepting all of it because they lacked the education and knowledge to understand it or to research. Learned helplessness. They simply relied on the government and industry for all of their information. A willful dumbing down of society. Though Brunner is British, this novel was written about America. Honestly, the novel seems to be written with some contempt for American hubris and sensibilities. He does let all the other 1st world entities off pretty easily in comparison. Written in 1972, Brunner is an incredible observer who seems to extrapolate what was happening then to a possible conclusion some 40 years later and it is really close. Not in his prediction of events, but in his prediction of how the government, the public, other countries, the military, the media etc view things and react and respond. Nothing in this book (laser cannons aside) is that far fetched. It is consistent with a theme I have been noticing in the older books I've been reading. It's likely not that Brunner was so prescient, it's that so very little has changed over the decades. Incredible and depressing.