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by Jack Vance
Download Tales of the Dying Earth (Millennium Fantasy Masterworks) fb2
Science Fiction
  • Author:
    Jack Vance
  • ISBN:
    1857989945
  • ISBN13:
    978-1857989946
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Orion Pub Co; paperback / softback edition (April 2000)
  • Pages:
    752 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Science Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1427 kb
  • ePUB format
    1280 kb
  • DJVU format
    1268 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    952
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf rtf txt


Jack Vance is one of the most remarkable talents to ever grace the world of science fiction. He is the author of dozens of science fiction and fantasy novels, including the World Fantasy Award winning Lyonnesse series, and the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning The Last Castle.

Jack Vance is one of the most remarkable talents to ever grace the world of science fiction. He lives in Oakland, California.

Fantasy Masterworks Volume 4. Table of Contents. TURJAN SAT in his workroom, legs sprawled out from the stool, back against and elbows on the bench. Mazirian the magician. Across the room was a cage; into this Turjan gazed with rueful vexation. The creature in the cage returned the scrutiny with emotions beyond conjecture. It was a thing to arouse pity-a great head on a small spindly body, with weak rheumy eyes and a flabby button of a nose. The mouth hung slackly wet, the skin glistened waxy pink.

The fourth in the Fantasy Masterworks series, the Dying Earth .

The fourth in the Fantasy Masterworks series, the Dying Earth saga inspired writers like Michael Moorcock and Gene Wolfe, who freely acknowledges his debt to Vance in his own Book of the New Sun. Here, in one volume, is Hugo, Nebula and World Fantasy Award-winning author Jack Vance’s classic Dying Earth saga comprising The Dying Earth, The Eyes of the Overworld, Cugel’s Saga and Rhialto the Marvellous. Travel to a far distant future, when the sun bleeds red in a dark sky, where magic and science is one, and the Earth has but a few short decades to live.

The books were numbered only through No. 50; in the 2013 reboot of the series the books are unnumbered, have a uniform look, and feature introductions by well-known writers and critics. 1 Numbered paperback series (2000-2007). Tales of the Dying Earth.

Dying Earth is a fantasy series by the American author Jack Vance, comprising four books originally published from 1950 to 1984. Some have been called picaresque. They vary from short story collections to a fix-up (novel created from older short stories), perhaps all the way to novel.

Shelves: dying-earth, fantastic-weird, satirical-humorous. Tales of The Dying Earth: A perfect introduction to Jack Vance’s work Originally posted at Fantasy Literature There aren’t any other books is SF/Fantasy quite like Jack Vance’s Tales of The Dying Earth

Shelves: dying-earth, fantastic-weird, satirical-humorous. Tales of The Dying Earth: A perfect introduction to Jack Vance’s work Originally posted at Fantasy Literature There aren’t any other books is SF/Fantasy quite like Jack Vance’s Tales of The Dying Earth. They have had an enormous influence on writers ranging from Gene Wolfe and George . Martin to Gary Gygax, the creator of Dungeons & Dragons.

Tales of the Dying Earth. Fantasy Masterworks Volume 4. Jack Vance is one of the most remarkable talents to ever grace the world of science fiction. His unique, stylish voice has been beloved by generations of readers. SALES POINTS in the Millennium SF Masterworks series, a library of the finest science fiction ever written 'All Vance's novels have exotic locales and cultures, resourceful heroes and vigorous action, but in Emphyrio they are raised to the pitch of perfection, making the novel a tremendous pleasure to read, and giving it also a mysterious beauty' - Kim Stanley Robinson 'Jack Vance.

Fantasy Masterworks is the companion to the SF Masterworks list, a collection of some of the most acclaimed, original or influential titles . 3 - The Worm Ouroboros . 4 - Tales of the Dying Earth Jack Vance. 5 - Little, Big John Crowley.

Fantasy Masterworks is the companion to the SF Masterworks list, a collection of some of the most acclaimed, original or influential titles within the genre of fantasy. 6 - The Chronicles of Amber Roger Zelazny. 7 - Viriconium M. John Harrison. 8 - The Conan Chronicles Volume 1Robert E. Howard. 9 - The Land of Laughs Jonathan Carroll. 10 - The Compleat Enchanter L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt. 11 - Lud-in-the-Mist Hope Mirrlees.

The fourth in the Fantasy Masterworks series, the Dying Earth saga inspired writers like Michael Moorcock and Gene Wolfe, who freely acknowledges his debt to Vance in his own Book of the New Sun. Here, in one volume, is Hugo, Nebula and World Fantasy Award-winning author Jack Vances classic Dying Earth saga comprising The Dying Earth, The Eyes of the Overworld, Cugels Saga and Rhialto the Marvellous. Travel to a far distant future, when the sun bleeds red in a dark sky, where magic and science is one, and the Earth has but a few short decades to live . . .

Cetnan
I find myself perplexed at the various opinions of people who do not like this work.

For them, I suppose a quote from the Dying Earth is in order, “I understand the gist of your speculation,' said Rhialto. 'It is most likely nuncupatory.”

Vance is a giant. His works are both unique and foundational. Should you look, you will find his influence everywhere. Find what authors of the fantasy and sci-fi genres have to say, and you will discover that he is an author's author. Neil Gaiman sings him praises. Gene Wolfe shows Vance's inspiration upon him by way of his acclaimed Books of the New Sun.

Much of Dungeons and Dragons is based upon the work of Jack Vance.

The Dying Earth is a wonderful setting that demonstrates the quirks and foibles of human nature. The dialogue in the books is witty, lively, and its like can be found nowhere else.

The works spark and flare with imagination, and thus dazzle and delight. The extremes found within will make you look askance at the book and laugh at their absurdity. You will find depravity, insanity, virtue, and love.

Where else can you find a scoundrel like Cugel the Clever as a protagonist? A character you know you should loathe but you cannot help but root for?

Most of all, Vance's books are engaging and just plain *fun*.

For people who just don't get it... I have to say, well, I just don't get how they just don't get it. It's right there, and it's wonderful. But, I guess there is just no accounting for some differences between human beings. It is all one.

After all, some people don't like pizza... I find the matter... suspicious.
Timberahue
This is the famous Dying Earth book followed by three books taking place in this legendarium. It is witty and funny. The Kugel books are one of the most enjoyable picaresque novels that I have read. This Dying Earth legendarium has inspired many fantasy authors to write further in this legendarium.
Gna
An excellent way to read all the collected stories, to me this writer's voice and techniques are totally unique in sci-fi and/or fantasy, and that is sort of what these stories are, a near perfect blending of sci-fi and fantasy. They are also hilarious at times, causing me to laugh out loud numerous times. I've read and re-read Vance's "Planet Of Adventure" series, actually many times since my youth, and I've always loved the way he made the characters speak and act, so wanting more Vance, and having read a "Cugel" story at one time, this book seemed a natural remedy for that condition. If you're not a fan of Jack Vance, you should be, and if you read these stories, you will be.
Dodo
This volume is a collection of 4 novels.
The first of these novels was written in 1950, and features extremely imaginitive and advanced ideas for the time.
I suggest it highly to anyone interested in the development of fantasy literature: Dying Earth was an important formative influence on D&D, and by extension; the rest of modern fantasy.

It also blurs the distiction between fantasy and Science fiction. The narration is very whimsical and fairy-tale-like, and it uses the far-future settign to support very fantastical and allegorical ideas. But this story is also hard speculative fiction about technology and how it defines the world. In this case, the technology is Magic, explained as a technology which no-one properly understands. But characters can ape it well enough, and so enjoy its effect in their world.

Am I the only one who sees this novel as a less-cartoony equivalent of AdventureTime?
Gaua
A fun-loving, magical journey with a little bit of everything. I call it LOTR/Book of the New Sun light. Lots of travel, characters, geography, culture, magic, strange occurrences, and plot to keep me going. It is "light" in that there are really some funny parts-- comical. The "hero" is comical. You feel bad for him, but he isn't really worth the feeling. Read it and find out. I especially enjoyed the middle two books in the series that deal with this "hero"- Cugel.