Download Blue Mars fb2

by Kim Stanley Robinson
Download Blue Mars fb2
Science Fiction
  • Author:
    Kim Stanley Robinson
  • ISBN:
    0002243156
  • ISBN13:
    978-0002243155
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Bantam Books; New Ed edition (1996)
  • Pages:
    616 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Science Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1819 kb
  • ePUB format
    1799 kb
  • DJVU format
    1758 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    333
  • Formats:
    rtf mbr lrf doc


The Mars trilogy is a series of science fiction novels by Kim Stanley Robinson that chronicles the settlement and terraforming of the planet Mars through the personal and detailed viewpoints of a wide variety of characters spanning almost two centuri.

The Mars trilogy is a series of science fiction novels by Kim Stanley Robinson that chronicles the settlement and terraforming of the planet Mars through the personal and detailed viewpoints of a wide variety of characters spanning almost two centuries. Ultimately more utopian than dystopian, the story focuses on egalitarian, sociological, and scientific advances made on Mars, while Earth suffers from overpopulation and ecological disaster.

Kim Stanley Robinson. for Lisa and David and Timothy. We came from Earth to Mars, and in that passage there was a certain purification. Things were easier to see, there was a freedom of action that we had not had before. A chance to express the best part of ourselves.

Robinson Kim Stanley. Читать онлайн Blue Mars. Robinson Kim Stanley. To get some help they climbed up into the humans’ reference books, and read up on ants. Blue Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson PART ONE Peacock Mountain Mars is free now. We’re on our own. No one tells us what to d. nn stood at the front of the train as she said this. But it’s so easy to backslide into old patterns of behavior. by Kim Stanley Robinson.

Kim Stanley Robinson - I read the whole trilogy from Red to Green to Blue Mars. Red Mars was excellent, as long as it kept to the idea of how to make Mars a planet where people could live

Kim Stanley Robinson - I read the whole trilogy from Red to Green to Blue Mars. Red Mars was excellent, as long as it kept to the idea of how to make Mars a planet where people could live. Green Mars was difficult for me to read because there was so much biological information I did not understand. Blue Mars was more about how much further humankind was taking us, including the ability to live for 200 years and more. The one theme I found in the complete series was that humankind takes its inability to work together as a whole

Kim Stanley Robinson (born March 23 1952) is an American science fiction writer, probably best known for his award-winning Mars trilogy.

Kim Stanley Robinson (born March 23 1952) is an American science fiction writer, probably best known for his award-winning Mars trilogy. In 2010, Robinson will be Guest of Honor at the 68th World Science Fiction Convention to be held in Melbourne, Australia. Kim Stanley Robinson was born in Waukegan, Illinois but grew up in Southern California.

Blue Mars Kim Stanley Robinson HarperCollins UK 9780007121656 : Mars is politically independent. A brave and buzzing new world, fully terraformed with genetically engineered plants and animals. Кол-во: о цене Наличие: Отсутствует. Возможна поставка под заказ. При оформлении заказа до: 17 янв 2020 Ориентировочная дата поставки: Середина Февраля При условии наличия книги у поставщика.

Kim Stanley Robinson is an American science fiction writer, probably best known for his award-winning Mars trilogy. His work delves into ecological and. See if your friends have read any of Kim Stanley Robinson's books. Kim Stanley Robinson’s Followers (3,985).

Kim Stanley Robinson (born March 23, 1952) is an American writer of science fiction. He has published nineteen novels and numerous short stories but is best known for his Mars trilogy. Many of his novels and stories have ecological, cultural, and political themes and feature scientists as heroes. Robinson has won numerous awards, including the Hugo Award for Best Novel, the Nebula Award for Best Novel and the World Fantasy Award.

Blue Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson - very good I read Red Mars and Green Mars so long ago now (possibly when they came out) and kept saving this one for a time when I could pay it my full attention.

Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars trilogy is one of science fiction's most honored series, with Red Mars winning the distinguished Nebula Award, and both Green Mars and Blue Mars honored with the Hugo. A modern-day classic of the genre, this epic saga deftly portrays the human stories behind Earth's most ambitious project yet: the terraforming of Mars


Puchock
Kim Stanley Robinson - I read the whole trilogy from Red to Green to Blue Mars. Red Mars was excellent, as long as it kept to the idea of how to make Mars a planet where people could live. Green Mars was difficult for me to read because there was so much biological information I did not understand. Blue Mars was more about how much further humankind was taking us, including the ability to live for 200 years and more. The one theme I found in the complete series was that humankind takes its inability to work together as a whole. There were always the arguments, debates, unwillingness to see all sides of every story. On the whole, it appears that humankind will never be able to get along, even into the far future. I think that is a legitimate quarrel to make, but I also find it disheartening to know.
Zamo
I had mixed feelings about starting this series, and yes there were plenty of times when I skimmed over the more dry and technical sections. But I was completely unprepared for how much I would care for the characters by the end of the series.

For the first two books they felt more like narrative devices than full fleshed out people - a way for the author to explore different aspects of colonisation. And that was fine, I was happily along for the ride.

But it's a long ride, and by the end they start to feel like old friends. And then those old friends start to reach the end of their run. They suddenly seem so much more human, so much more vulnerable. I found myself tearing up at several points during particularly poignant goodbyes.

Taken together, this book completes the trilogy by instilling it with the emotional investment that wasn't necessarily present in the first two. Bravo, Kim Stanley Robinson. Bravo.
Delan
KSR writes like he has been given a blank book of a predetermined size and he must fill it. He may be a good writer but there is just too much filler, filler that would best be left out. When reading his works I find myself skipping pages because of his tedious descriptions. Some of his lists have dozens of items when in most cases just a few would suffice; and some of his descriptions, though informative and correct, are simply too long. I feel that the Mars trilogy should be condensed to a single three part book.
Bys
This is the final installment of the Red Mars series, easily the most engaging novel I've read in twenty years or more. After eading the first one, Red Mars, I wasn't going to stop until I'd read it all.

The strength of the series, in its sweeping scope, is its insights into political science as it plays out on an exceptionally large cast of well-developed characters. By means of a device available only to SciFi writers, the characters have access to life-extending DNA modifications which enables them to bear witness to events over the span of a couple of centuries. Some may see this as a contrivance, but this life extension exercise is so plausibly interwoven into the warp and weft of the story strucutre that it didn't bother me at all.

Robonson writes really beautifully, with extended (some might say over-extended) landscape descriptions, local and global geography, and what appears to be an encyclopedic knowledge of geology. The physics gets a bit fanciful in the later volumes, much less so early on. Whjat really drives the novel, though, is the conflicts between characters and institutions, both of which continue to change over time. You've got sex. You've got romance. You've got the love of nature, the quest for power, and the reactions of those who don't like it. What more could you want?

I would given this five stars but for a few annoying flaws. As the saga goes on, and the author is obviously tiring, you find more errors creeping in: Character names misspelled, plot lines set up and then left unresolved, a character dying and then reappearing with no explanation, small words missing here and there. Evidently the editor(s) got as tired as the author.

Still, on balance, a good read, if not quite as exciting and engaging as Red Mars.
Hrguig
The Mars series is fantastic science fiction. Big on hard science and carrying the same kind of long arcing storylines that made Asimov's Foundation series one of my favorites, this series deserves to be placed at the acme of science fiction's anthology. As a conclusion to the trilogy, this book delivers a vivid picture of the burgeoning colonists, having cast of the chains of the Metanational Corporations and the decrepit remains of the UN they controlled, running head long into the problems of self-governance. These issues are compounded, of course, by the nature of living on a world in the midst of being terraformed, desperate immigration from an Earth that is deep into ecological disaster from overpopulation, and complications from the newly discovered treatment that allows humans to live for centuries. While it can be a bit slow at times this book is well worth your time.