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by Louise Marley
Download The Terrorist of Irustan (Ace Science Fiction) fb2
Science Fiction
  • Author:
    Louise Marley
  • ISBN:
    0441006191
  • ISBN13:
    978-0441006199
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Ace Trade; Ace trade pbk. ed edition (June 1, 1999)
  • Pages:
    323 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Science Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1277 kb
  • ePUB format
    1241 kb
  • DJVU format
    1431 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    198
  • Formats:
    mobi azw docx lrf


Bonney Lake, WA. The Terrorists of Irustan.

Bonney Lake, WA. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

The Terrorists of Irustan Ace science fiction.

On the planet of Irustan, where women have few rights, mendicant Zahra IbSada helps her friend Kalen retrieve Kalen's daughter from an abusive marriage, an act of terrorism that comes to have life-changing consequences for the women of the planet. Результаты поиска по книге. Результаты 1 – 3 из 21. Стр. 15 A man of the household, acting as escort, would sit on one side of the screen, protected from the sight of the mcdicant doing her work  . The Terrorists of Irustan Ace science fiction.

Sometimes a good science fiction book can warn us about the direction in which we are headed. On the planet of Irustan, Muslim fundamentalists who follow the "Second Prophet" have created a society that's just to the right of the Taliban. This book is, in my opinion, about an exaggeration or perversion of Islam, just as The Handmaid's Tale is about a perversion of Christianity. One of the peculiarities of Irustani society is the focus on the mind and soul to the exclusion of the body, which means that medicine - with its fixation of disease and imperfection - is seen as a practice fit only for women.

The terrorists of Irustan. Science fiction, American. New York : Ace Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Authors: Louise Marley. Fifth Homily, The Book of the Second Prophet Crippled Asa could never accompany Qadir to the mines, but Diya had often visited Delta Team the staff sat together around the long table in the kitchen. Diya folded his arms, looking around at Cook and Marcus and the maids. The chief director was a team leader, but I can’t imagine a man more different from Binya Maris.

The Terrorists of Irustan book. In Marley's invented world, there's an important catch: women are the only medical professionals in this society, and it's this gendered delegation of all bodily concerns to women that Marley imagines as the key to a complicated lock.

Science Fiction & Fantasy. Books related to The Terrorists of Irustan. Back to Science Fiction & Fantasy.

Marley's beautiful, compelling science fiction novel is at once heartbreaking and uplifting, as it follows the frustrated lives of women living in a repressive religious society. The world of Irustan is detailed, subtle in its range of customs, and wholly believeable. The empowerment of a small group of women through acts of biological terrorism is exciting in its inexorable unfolding. I absolutely could not put this book down! Mesmerizing and Disturbing. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 19 years ago. If you want a quick, scary trip of the imagination, try Irustan, Marley's finely. Feminist science fiction from the author of the paperback Receive the Gift, etc. According to planet Irustan's inflexible religious code, women must be secluded and veiled, and are given away at the whim of the household's chief male

The Terrorists of Irustan. In this brilliant novel from the author of Sing the Light, a talented medicant defies the rule of men-and changes the lives of every woman on the planet. According to planet Irustan's inflexible religious code, women must be secluded and veiled, and are given away at the whim of the household's chief male. Nearly all men work in the rhodium mines, where they unavoidably inhale dust and become susceptible to a fatal disease; despite wearing masks, they require regular treatment. Their religion, however, bids them disregard their bodies, so men cannot be doctors.

Ace Books is an American specialty publisher of science fiction and fantasy books. The company was founded in New York City in 1952 by Aaron A. Wyn and began as a genre publisher of mysteries and westerns. It soon branched out into other genres, publishing its first science fiction (SF) title in 1953. This was successful, and science fiction titles outnumbered both mysteries and westerns within a few years.

On the planet of Irustan, where women have few rights, mendicant Zahra IbSada helps her friend Kalen retrieve Kalen's daughter from an abusive marriage, an act of terrorism that comes to have life-changing consequences for the women of the planet. Original.

Breder
I enjoyed this book so much. I often think that science fiction, like travel, is an excellent way to examine or contemplate our home cultures. Sometimes a good science fiction book can warn us about the direction in which we are headed.

This book is, in my opinion, about an exaggeration or perversion of Islam, just as The Handmaid's Tale is about a perversion of Christianity.

I would have given it 5 stars, except for the fact that if is riddled with bizarre typographical & grammatical errors.
There are frequent occasions where a space between words has been omitted. Likethis.
The numeral 1 has been substituted for the word "I."
. But the worst errors, by far, concern quotation marks and paragraphs whoever did the final transcription of this book really needs to study the following subjects: What happens when a different character starts speaking? (Just keep writing, or start a new paragraph?) How do you handle quotation marks if a character speaks for a long time, on different subjects, requiring two paragraphs?
Note, please, that I didn't give advice on the quotation mark difficulties. It's not hard to find the answers. These particular errors were especially annoying. They almost caused me to stop reading on several occasions, which would have been a shame. I would have missed a good book.
Kale
It is impossible to read this book without the perspective of 9/11 and the subsequent "war on terror". "Terrorists of Irustan" raises a slew of uncomfortable questions that have gained startling relevance in the last several years, many of which, unfortunately, have been stifled and deflected to the point we're encouraged not to think about them. For this reason, I think "Irustan" - which deals with Islam, women's rights, terrorism, and self-defense vs. pre-emptive action, among other things - has gained in depth and meaning since its original writing.

On the planet of Irustan, Muslim fundamentalists who follow the "Second Prophet" have created a society that's just to the right of the Taliban. One of the peculiarities of Irustani society is the focus on the mind and soul to the exclusion of the body, which means that medicine - with its fixation of disease and imperfection - is seen as a practice fit only for women. Zahra ibSada is a medicant who has had it up to here with patching up abused women and children and sending them back to the husbands and fathers who own them, so when a friend comes to her in desperation because her young daughter is about to be given to a man who has already killed two wives, Zahra steels herself to do the unthinkable.

At first, Zahra tries to limit her actions to self-defense, acting only to save the lives of her friends and their children. Soon, however, she realizes that simply reacting will not be enough. She must seek to outright change her society if the abuse is to stop, and that's when she moves into the tricky realm of terrorism. She starts choosing victims carefully, hoping to send a message, knowing all the while that each step could be her last.

Putting such a human face on terrorism is a bold move, and forces us to question the one-dimensional portrayal we usually accept. When you're absolutely powerless, when you live your life in virtual slavery, the "property" of another human being, what other choice do you have? Is it terrorism for a slave to harm her owner? To harm another slave's owner? How does a slave change the institution of slavery? What happens when terrorism is not only the only answer, but the right one?

As always, I am supremely impressed by Marley's abilities to craft complex, nuanced characters and to make us genuinely care for them. Her vision of Irustan makes it easy to understand the mixed feelings of so many characters; an alien world that is beautiful and harsh, traditional and unforgiving. This book is highly recommended reading for anyone who refuses to accept sound-bite explanations of the current situation in the Middle East or simplistic answers to the most difficult dilemmas facing us today.
Dainris
The book examines, through placing the action on a hypothetical planetary colony 300 years in the future, a society similar to that in contemporary conservative Islamic cultures: to examine it and to cry out for balance and justice for the women trapped in the potential harshness of the mindset that can go along with that culture. I read it because the author had made a passing reference to the Irustan culture in the first of her books that I encountered (The Child Goddess) and I was intrigued to follow up on the reference. This book blindsided me with the inescapable heartache and frustration of an intelligent, compassionate woman married to an intelligent compassionate man, but both victims of the culture that locks them into conditioned responses to their culture, until the woman finally is driven to act until the culture takes notice. The characters absolutely ring true, as does the inevitable outcome of the many plot lines. I would give it 5 stars, but the painful elements are very emotionally challenging for the reader-I could not recommend it for everyone.
Zicelik
I read this book when it was first published. It is truly a classic tale. I read it at least once a year. It is assigned reading for my students and it has been given as a gift multiple times. It is very informative for our society today in the 21st century.
Louise is a very thoughtful and thought provoking author.
Gunos
This is a story you will not be able to put down, and certainly it will stay in your mind when you are not reading it. It is science fiction/fantasy that has multiple layers and can lead to some deep questions. The parallels to the Middle East cannot be avoided; but the story is so well crafted, that is not a distraction. Surprises emerge when you think you have the characters and plot figured out. And the characters are so well developed, you really get to understand them. I thought Atwood's "The Handmaid's Tale" and Walker's "Possessing the Secret of Joy" were the most wrenching books on the repression of women in parts of the world, but Marley is masterful in this book. I can highly recommend this novel and this author. Don't miss "The Glass Harmonica" as well.