Download Green Pearl Tr fb2

by Jack Vance
Download Green Pearl Tr fb2
  • Author:
    Jack Vance
  • ISBN:
    0425087468
  • ISBN13:
    978-0425087466
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Berkley Trade; 1st edition (April 1, 1986)
  • Pages:
    360 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1328 kb
  • ePUB format
    1610 kb
  • DJVU format
    1336 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    447
  • Formats:
    doc mobi lrf lit


The Green Pearl is another engrossing adventure in Jack Vance's whimsical world.

The Green Pearl is another engrossing adventure in Jack Vance's whimsical world.

Across the Ceald rode the party, now five: up to Green Man's Gap where, as was the custom, all turned for a final glimpse of Watershade, then down Rundle River Valley to Hag Harbour and a night at the Sea Coral Inn. Then: an early departure, with harness jingling loud in the pre-dawn chill and up over Cape Haze with the first red rays of day shining wan on their backs, and, early in the afternoon, arrival at Domreis.

Поиск книг BookFi BookFi - BookFinder. Download books for free. Jack Vance - Elder Isles 2 - The Green Pearl.

In THE GREEN PEARL, King Aillas of Troicinet defends the peace of the Elder Isles against both the Ska marauders .

In THE GREEN PEARL, King Aillas of Troicinet defends the peace of the Elder Isles against both the Ska marauders who once enslaved him and the wicked King Casmir. While organizing the unruly barons in the frontiers of his land, Aillas goes out of his way to capture the lovely Ska noblewoman who once stung him with her disregard. When he gets separated from his men, his dream of forcing the lady's recognition becomes the toil of dragging a defiant captive across lands governed by Casmir's henchmen.

Most of his work was published under the name Jack Vance.

We are like Rottentomatoes or Metacritic for books. We also do book giveaways. Most of his work was published under the name Jack Vance. He also wrote 11 mystery novels as John Holbrook Vance and three as Ellery Queen, and once each used pseudonyms Alan Wade, Peter Held, John van See, and Jay Kavanse. Vance won the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement in 1984. The Science Fiction Hall of Fame inducted him in 2001.

The Green Pearl is another engrossing adventure in Jack Vance's whimsical world

The Green Pearl is another engrossing adventure in Jack Vance's whimsical world. First, I admire Vance's florid imagination. His world and its creatures are unique and, while not as bizarre as Lewis Carroll's, there's plenty of weirdness. Second, I love Jack Vance's odd but irresistible style. There's no message, no lesson, no pretensions - it's just pure fast-paced entertainment.


Painwind
This is the second book in the Lyonesse trilogy, and differs from its predecessor in some respects. The tone is much lighter, offering many more dialogues with the typical Vance wit and humor. Casimir plays a much smaller role in the story, removing one of the more brutal antagonists. The sorceror Visbhume is introduced and resembles Cugel more than any other Vance character I have read recently.

The story moves forward the efforts of Ailias to counter the Ska presence in the Ulflands, including reunion with the ska noblegirl Tatzel, and a number of combat scenes. Ongoing machinations of Tartumello (sp) continue, though the sorcerors play an overall small role in the story, Visbhume excepted.

A major plot thread resolution here (the ska presence in the Ulflands) has a resolution which is far too easy, resembling other major political resolutions seen in some other stories by Vance, including The Pnume, The Wankh, and arguably The Dirdir - essentially, protagonist dictates terms to enemy from position of (sometimes) apparent strength, and enemy accepts unconditionally, end of problem.

This is a fabulous book, and I am looking forward to re-reading Madouc in the near future.
Marinara
Jack Vance has been my favorite science-fiction and fantasy author for over 35 years so I'm inclined to be prejudiced. However, if you have read any of his fantasy books and in particular "Lyonesse" Lyonesse (Book 1)which precedes "The Green Pearl" you will not be disappointed by this sequel. All the elements are continued and the mix of real old earth history and "elder earth" events are beautifully woven together in this story. As always, it is Vance's use of the English language that particularly set his books apart. If I were given 2 or 3 random pages from any of his books to read, I would immediately identify them as being written by Jack Vance. "The Green Pearl" is a gem.
Brariel
I wasn't a big fan of the first book but since I bought all 3 of them at the same time I decided to give the second book a try to see if it gets any better. If I was an average reader I probably wouldn't have even finished this second book, I will always finish a book if I start it even if it is terrible, and this book was not good at all for the first half. Thankfully the book finished much better. I still really don't like any of the characters in the book and just as bad are all the names in the book that are hard to pronounce and distracts me from the story itself.

The first half of the book is a 1 start...the second half of the book is maybe 3 and a half stars...the story really picks up but I still care nothing for the characters. The second half will get me to go ahead and read the final book in the Trilogy, but the series itself so far is no better than 3 stars and probably only 2 stars. It probably doesn't help that I'm reading this series around the same time I've been reading GRRM, Robin Hobb and Patrick Rothfuss...all of which are a couple of notches above this trilogy.

Not something I'd recommend.
Mr.mclav
The book came in a very nice condition, as advertised. Excited to finally have the entire series.
Zacki
The Green Pearl is another engrossing adventure in Jack Vance's whimsical world. This installment of Lyonesse mainly follows Aillas, now King of Troicinet, as he seeks revenge on the Ska, tests his infatuation with Tatzel, deals with a couple of traitors, and tries to thwart the ambitions of King Casmir of Lyonesse who, unbeknownst to Casmir, is Aillas's son's grandfather. We also spend quite a bit of time with Shimrod, Glyneth, Melancthe, and some new and excellent characters such as the duplicitous innkeeper Dildahl, the dogged but distractible Visbhume, and The Notable and Singular Zuck (Dealer in Objects Unique Under the Firmament).

There are two main reasons that I love Lyonesse. First, I admire Vance's florid imagination. His world and its creatures are unique and, while not as bizarre as Lewis Carroll's, there's plenty of weirdness. Second, I love Jack Vance's odd but irresistible style. There's no message, no lesson, no pretensions -- it's just pure fast-paced entertainment. But best of all, Vance's deliberately peculiar and droll prose makes me laugh:

"A crippled ex-soldier named Manting for ten years had served the county as executioner. He did his work efficiently and expunged Long Liam's life definitely enough, but in a style quite devoid of that extra element of surprise and poignancy, which distinguished the notable executioner from his staid colleague. ... [then Manting comes into possession of the Green Pearl which Long Liam had carried] ... Thereafter, all who watched Manting declared that they had never seen the executioner's work done with more grace and attention to detail, so at times Manting and the condemned man seemed participants in a tragic drama which set every heart to throbbing; and at last, when the latch had been sprung, or the blow struck, or the torch tossed into the faggots, there was seldom a dry eye among the spectators."

And the dialog is truly humorous -- so many authors try, but Vance gets it right. Just two short examples:

* The barber said politely: "Sire, I suggest that you hold your feet motionless while I am cutting your toenails."
* When the beautiful but empty-headed Melancthe tries to seduce Shimrod, he says: "My character is intensely strong, and my will is like iron; still, I see no reason to demonstrate their strength needlessly."

Again I shake my head in bewilderment that this charming trilogy can not be acquired by the usual book-obtaining methods. What a shame!