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by Elizabeth Moon
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Fantasy
  • Author:
    Elizabeth Moon
  • ISBN:
    1841490156
  • ISBN13:
    978-1841490151
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Time Warner Books Uk; paperback / softback edition (October 31, 2000)
  • Pages:
    505 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Fantasy
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1516 kb
  • ePUB format
    1944 kb
  • DJVU format
    1563 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    416
  • Formats:
    rtf docx mobi azw


Book I. Elizabeth Moon. A Baen Books Original. She had the healing hands, a legacy of a great-grandmother’s indiscretion in the days when such indiscretions meant a quick marriage to some handy serf.

Book I. Cover art by Larry Elmore. She hardly believed the change, and having a priest of Esea in the birthing room convinced her only that the high lords had no decency. In the lord’s hall, the infant’s future was quickly determined.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Surrender None (Legacy of Gird, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Paksenarrion could never have fulfilled her destiny had it not been. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Elizabeth Moon has many interests besides writing. Liar's Oath (May 1992)-sequel to Surrender None. She has a musical background, having played the accordion during her university days and sung in choirs Moon is also an experienced paramedic and has served in various capacities in local government. The Legacy of Gird (September 1996)-paperback omnibus. Paladin's Legacy or Legend of Paksenarrion novels.

Surrender None Elizabeth Moon. WHY WE FIGHT УYou lost children?Ф Others shushed that voice, someone in a leather cloak, but Gird answered it, counting them on his fingers. УMy first two sons died of fever; the lord refused us herb-right in the wood. My wife lost two babes young, one from hunger and one from fever. My eldest daughter they raped; killed her husband.

In the three books of THE DEED OF PAKSENARRION, Elizabeth Moon swept us away to an extraordinary fantasy world and . Gird, the Liberator, who taught his people that they could fight - and win - against oppression.

In the three books of THE DEED OF PAKSENARRION, Elizabeth Moon swept us away to an extraordinary fantasy world and introduced us to Paksenarrion, a lowly sheepfarmer's daughter destined to become a warrior among warriors and a paladin beyond compare. But Paksenarrion could never have fulfilled her destiny had it not been for one who came before.

A Baen books original" - . No table-of-contents pages found.

Baen Pub. Enterprises : Distributed by Simon & Schuster. A Baen books original" - . Canon EOS 5D Mark II. City.

This book is a prequel to Moon's DEED OF PAKSENARRION. It is every bit as good and, in some respects, even better. That is no small accomplishment. The DEED trilogy tells the story of the paladin, Paksennarion. It is a wonderful story but it is based upon a created mythos of the land in which the character lives. Central to much of it is the yeomen, marshals and paladins of Gird.

Hardcover Paperback Kindle. Elizabeth Moon is science fiction and fantasy writer. In a small city of McAllen, she started to write very early, at the age of six.

His clothes were still damp; he turned them over and hoped the morning sun would dry them. Then he eyed the trees, and realized it would be a long time before the sun came into the clearing. t was another cold mess of soaked grain. Gird was already tired of it. He was spoiled, he supposed, by having had a wife and daughter with a parrion for herbs and cooking. Pidi leaned against him as he ate, and Gird put an arm around him. He wished he could have left the boy with Mali's brother-he was really too young for this.

Paksenarrion could never have fulfilled her destiny had it not been for one who came before. Gird, the peasant, the armsman, the Liberator who taught his people that they could fight - and win - against oppression. This is his story, the first of two prequels to the "Deed of Paksenarrion" trilogy.

Mikarr
This book is a prequel to Moon's DEED OF PAKSENARRION. It is every bit as good and, in some respects, even better. That is no small accomplishment.

The DEED trilogy tells the story of the paladin, Paksennarion. It is a wonderful story but it is based upon a created mythos of the land in which the character lives. Central to much of it is the yeomen, marshals and paladins of Gird. We learn only a little of Gird in that series but it is enough to whet the appetite. With SURRENDER NONE, the appetite is sated.

Gird is a peasant treated cruelly and unjustly by his feudal overlords. Finally, he is forced into outlawry but chooses not to follow the path of the brigand. He instead tries to make things better. He works for the betterment not only of his own people but even their oppressors as well and leads a peasant revolt. Unlike that of Spartacus, his succeeds.

This is a work of fantasy but, as in Moon's other works, the fantastic elements are understated. There are gnomes and mentions of dwarves and elves but they are accessories. Magic does play a role and is even one of the reasons for the struggle portrayed within the book but the story is not of the magical; it is of the people. That in itself is magical.

It is a wonderful read all the way around.
Kefym
This book is a part of a prequel series to The Deed of Paksenarrion, detailing the story of Gird. It is not as good as those books, as prequels seldom are.

The main issue within the story is that it has, for the most part, only one character. There is a section in the beginning in which Gird’s older brother is a recurring and real personality, and towards the end Selamis is given some jumps and changes in attitude. Dynamic moments between characters usually occur with Gird and other characters who appear only once. Those with Selamis (who is said to have changed but not shown to have) feel largely unmotivated.

The book is about a man leading and saving an entire country, so on one level it makes sense that all other characters are subordinate, but this does not mean they must be flat. Other characters show up for a scene, or recur throughout the story whenever it furthers the plot or changes Gird, but he alone is fully realized, human. Other characters are allowed to act independently, but their feelings are never demonstrated, their essence is entirely lacking. Often, what Gird does is told entirely on the conceptual level, leaving out characters altogether, and making for an emotionless narrative.

Secondarily, there are no real setbacks for Gird once he embarks on his quest to free the country. In the beginning of the book he loses everything and is driven to fighting, but from there the rest is a steady climb to victory, with no doubts that it will come. Further, Gird never directly meets any characters who completely oppose him after the incident in the beginning with the lord of his village. Everyone he meets, even when they at first wish him harm, is swayed to his side within a few pages at most, or at least does not hurt him and moves out of the narrative. The evil he is fighting against is entirely conceptual the entire time, and the good he brings is not much realer. The only real opposition that the reader feels (once Gird has overcome his beginnings and embarked on his quest) is the hardship of the Gird’s responsibility, which others cannot appreciate. This lack of deep-felt hardship contributes to the impossibility of empathy within the tale. The one thing any book needs to do is make the reader care, and this book did not achieve that.

Another issue is clarity: between parts of the book time gaps exist which are not clarified in a timely fashion. For example, after the first gap Gird’s family is attacked but the reader is not told until afterwards who the people who are seen being injured are. What could have been a moment of high drama is instead rife with confusion. This was the moment, for me, that the book started to go bad. Also in the vein of clarity, late in the book when magic is performed it is often not clear what is going on. Again, attempts to understand what was going on detached me.

That said, the beginning (when Gird is actively experiencing strife) is engaging, enjoyable. It held enough emotional weight to carry the story pages beyond, and if the rest of the book had been told with the same specificity and feeling it would have made for a good story. Alas, the beginning was the best part and the quality of the story slowly devolved until the end found me only glad I had finished the book.

Beyond the beginning, this book failed to make me care. I rate this book 3/10.
Tall
This is sort of the back-story to Moon's "Deed of Paksenarrion" trilogy, set some five hundred years before the time of the mercenary companies, a time when Gird is a hero, almost a demigod. But Gird is an ordinary enough farmer at the beginning, lover of cows and children, who wants only peace to raise and reap his crops. But the magelords, workers of magic, who came into the northern lands several centuries before his own time, have become increasingly oppressive to the peasants as they have lost their powers. Gird, who is a big, strong boy, tried to become a solider, a member of his lord's guard, but his horror at having to witness a bloody punishment for a child's act of mischief ends that career. And, later in life, as his friends and family are mistreated and starved and raped and killed, Gird finds himself outlawed, like so many others. But here he begins to change, and he uses what basic military skills he once learned to convert other outlaws into the basis of a rebellious peasant army. You know where all this is going, right? But even Gird the Marshal-General wants peace, not mere vengeance, and he spends as much time thinking about and learning the law as he does learning strategy. It's a morality play, Good against Evil, and a pretty good one. And because Gird is very human, with a temper and a tendency to drink too much, this isn't exactly a fairy tale, either.
Hystana
It would seem to me to be almost impossible to make a better book or set of books than the "Deeds of Paksnarion". "Surrender None" by far surmounted the previous novels in this case. It reminded me strongly of Pearl S. Bucks "The Good Earth" or "The Grapes of Wrath". If you like or think you would like this book I encourage you to read it.