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by Charles De Lint,Brian Froud
Download The Wild Wood (Brian Froud's Faerielands) fb2
Fantasy
  • Author:
    Charles De Lint,Brian Froud
  • ISBN:
    0553096303
  • ISBN13:
    978-0553096309
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Bantam/Spectra; First Edition edition (February 1, 1994)
  • Pages:
    221 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Fantasy
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1634 kb
  • ePUB format
    1696 kb
  • DJVU format
    1944 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    482
  • Formats:
    lrf doc docx lrf


The Queen of Bad Faeries - Brian Wendy Froud - I think this art is now on a deck of tarot cards! This week’s Flashback Friday: Good Faeries, Bad Faeries by Brian Froud. My first exposure to the land of Brian Froud was through the films The Dark Crystal.

The Queen of Bad Faeries - Brian Wendy Froud - I think this art is now on a deck of tarot cards! This week’s Flashback Friday: Good Faeries, Bad Faeries by Brian Froud. Queen of the bad faeries by Brian Froud is beautifully displayed on an inch ceramic tile with a full cork backing and two recessed hangers that fold flat for counter-top use. A beautiful gossamer. Fairies in Legend, Lore, and Literature by Terri Windling: Summer Journal of Mythic Arts, Endicott Studio (Art by Brian Froud)

Personal Name: De Lint, Charles, 1951-. Publication, Distribution, et. New York Brian Froud's faerielands; #1.

Personal Name: De Lint, Charles, 1951-. New York Brian Froud's faerielands; General Note: "A Bantam spectra book" . General Note: Text illustrated by Brian Froud. General Note: "A Byron Preiss book.

Interspersed with enchanting art by Brian Froud, this book is ripe with natural settings, mysterious faerie happenings, and a human protagonist who you care for the whole way through

Interspersed with enchanting art by Brian Froud, this book is ripe with natural settings, mysterious faerie happenings, and a human protagonist who you care for the whole way through. Note: some spoilers to follow, each is warned of beforehand). The few qualms I have with the story are these.

Brian Froud, the artist who gave us Faeries, presents a magnificently created world alive with color and the magical storytelling of Charles de. .Adventures of Liz in the Wild Woods by .

Brian Froud, the artist who gave us Faeries, presents a magnificently created world alive with color and the magical storytelling of Charles de Lint. item 6 Adventures of Liz in the Wild Woods by . Baire Hardcover Book Free Shipping!

Bibliographic Details. Title: Brian Froud's Faerielands: The Wild Wood.

Bibliographic Details. Publisher: Bantam Books, New York. Publication Date: 1994. Illustrator: Illustrated by Froud, Brian. Artist Eithnie, living in the remote Canadian woods, finds disturbing faerie images creeping unbidden into her work.

De Lint & Froud managed to take a profoundly eerie, moving story about . Her court was a forest, her courtiers the beasts of the land, the birds of the air. Once she held all our histories in her mind.

De Lint & Froud managed to take a profoundly eerie, moving story about the tie between art and madness, spirituality and nature, and shoehorn in so much pseudo-scientific ist nonsense that it seemed like an entirely new (and poorer) book had replaced the end of the one I had started out reading. Although he started writing fantasy at the time I was completely addicted to the genre, I somehow missed his books.

Brian Froud's World of Faerie (2007). The Wild Wood (1994) by Charles de Lint. The Wood Wife (1996) by Terri Windling.

For the Canadian comedian, see Brian Froud (actor). Froud is married to Wendy Froud, a puppet-maker and sculptor whom he met at the Jim Henson Studios in 1978 while working on The Dark Crystal. The couple married on 31 May 1980, in Chagford. Brian Froud's World of Faerie (2007). Heart of Faerie Oracle (2010). How to See Faeries (2011) - With John Matthews.

A young artist returns to her cabin in the deep woods of Canada to concentrate on her work and finds that, somehow, strange and beautiful creatures are creeping into her art.

Bynelad
Slow and poetic- I really had to force myself to finish it. I like Brian Froud's art but here it feels like it has little to do with the story and falls more into the category of art rather than illustration. They are static and did not compel much inspection or suggest much in the way of story. The writing was slow and introspective - it took a long time for anything to happen and when eventually something starts to happen it is both vague, canned, and brief. Overall the whole book was underwhelming.
Altad
Originally published back in 1994 as part of a planned Faerielands series of books by Bantam Spectra, where authors would create a novel based on a favorite piece of Brian Froud Fairie art. In the end due to publishing issues only this one and 'Something Rich and Strange' by Patricia A. Mckillip made it out at the time. This Tor/Orb paperback reprint does not contain the original interior illustrations, or the original Brian Froud cover art. This is the third 'De Lint' book that I have read, the previous two being 'Yarrow' and 'Greenmantle'. I am fond of forest/woodland themes. Appropriately the book reads like a painting, and art is central to the book. The language here is way more advanced I think than either Greenmantle or Yarrow, this is 6 years further into his career, with an improvement that time can bring in a writer. It is a short novel (only 200 Pages), focused primarily around one character and her interaction with the forest world of Faerie. I come into this book not normally being an Urban Fantasy (or in this case Rural Fantasy) reader. It does read like viewing a fine oil painting of a forest scene. A lovely character focused book where the language is a joy. Someone referred to this as not one of his stronger books, I disagree, in the context of the novel is supposed to be it is just fine. While I'm glad I started with Greenmantle, this is De Lint moving forward with his writing art. For information the other two books that were supposed to be issued as the Brian Froud's Faerieland series were 'The Woodwife' by Terri Windling, and 'Hannah's Garden' by Midori Synder.
Moonshaper
I felt really lucky to be able to find one of de Lint's earlier books I hadn't yet read! It brought back earlier stories he'd shared and reawakened the longing in my heart for the natural wonders de Lint captures so (seemingly) effortlessly. Awesome find!
Vosho
This is the third book that I've read in the Brian Froud's Faerielands series and is unfortunately my least favorite of the bunch so far. Brian Froud invited four of the top fantasy authors to pick their favorite piece of his work and write a story based upon it. The four authors and their respective books are:

Something Rich and Strange by Patricia A. McKillip
The Wild Wood by Charles de Lint
The Wood Wife by Terri Windling
Hannah's Garden by Midori Snyder

The Wild Wood tells the story of Eithnie, an artist who lives in a cabin in the woods who begins seeing creatures that she believes to be faeries in her art. She determines that they are reaching out to her for help but she isn't willing to believe at first that her encounters are anything more than a dream. Once she realizes that not only are the faerie real but that she's truly the only one that can help them stay alive she resolves to do whatever she can to help.
Zeueli
de Lint is the best.
Umor
Great experience. Product was delivered in a timely manner and as described.
Grarana
Perfect
I really like reading the early de Lint. He was full of ideas and wonder, not that he's stopped now. But there seems to be a little more magic in his earlier works.