Download Angelmass fb2

by Timothy Zahn
Download Angelmass fb2
Fantasy
  • Author:
    Timothy Zahn
  • ISBN:
    081258418X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0812584189
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Tor Science Fiction; 1st edition (September 16, 2002)
  • Subcategory:
    Fantasy
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1161 kb
  • ePUB format
    1208 kb
  • DJVU format
    1166 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    859
  • Formats:
    docx mobi lrf lrf


To my mother: The first angel in my life.

To my mother: The first angel in my life. CHAPTER 1. There were two of them waiting as Jereko Kosta climbed awkwardly up the ladder through the shuttle hatch: a young ensign and an equally young crewer second class, both clothed in shiny black and silver Pax military uniforms, the glistening red and blue threads of the Komitadji’s insignia pattern swirling with arrogant pride across collarbone and shoulder.

She repeated the word silently to herself, her thoughts spinning with old plans and fresh possibilities. For the Institute’s self-focusing theory to be right, hunterships have to occasionally drop bits of mass into Angelmass, Forsythe said. Not the Daviees’ spare, which she’d promised herself not to take, but a government angel. One that would probably never be missed. If they drop things there, it follows that they should also sometimes drop things during other parts of the trip, too. Which could show up as recalibration problems when catapulting, Hanan said, nodding slowly.

Timothy Zahn attended Michigan State University, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in physics in 1973. He then moved to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and achieved an . degree in physics in 1975. While he was pursuing a doctorate in physics, his adviser became ill and died. Zahn never completed the doctorate. In 1975 he had begun writing science fiction as a hobby, and he bec Timothy Zahn attended Michigan State University, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in physics in 1973.

Timothy Zahn, Angelmass. Thank you for reading books on BookFrom.

From open road media. Find a full list of our authors and titles at ww. penroadmedia. FOLLOW US. @ OpenRoadMedia. Timothy Zahn, Angelmass.

Since the discovery of the black hole called Angelmass, the Empyrean has used angels, particles emitted by the black hole, to keep its officials honest. The Pax is sure that these angels must be part of an alien plot, and Kostas is sent to investigate.

Timothy Zahn is the Hugo Award-winning author of more than a dozen original science fiction novels and the bestselling Star Wars trilogy Heir to the Empire, among other works. He lives in the Pacific Northwest. Библиографические данные.

Angelmass, a black hole deep in space, emits "angels," small particles that render humans calm, reasonable, and virtually incapable of lying. The Empyrean, human colonies in the far reaches of the galaxy, has discovered the angels and the power they wield. All members of Empyrean government must carry an angel. The Earth-based Empire, the Pax, view the angels as an alien plot to subvert humanity. They dispatch Jereko Kosta, an innocent academic, to spy on the Empyrean and find out the truth about angels.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Angelmass, a black hole deep in space, emits angels, small particles that render humans calm, reasonable.

Read Angelmass, by Timothy Zahn online on Bookmate – Fast-paced action. first-rate sf space adventure (Library Journal) from the New York Times–bestselling author of Star Wars: Thrawn. Deep in space lies the black hole known as Angelmass, so called because it emits enigmatic particles with the unusual ability to render humans calm, reasonable, and incapable of lying-which would normally be seen as a good thing.

This is complete list of works by American science fiction and fantasy author Timothy Zahn. The Blackcollar (1983). The Backlash Mission (1986). The Judas Solution (2006). Both The Blackcollar and The Backlash Mission were released in one joint novel titled Blackcollar in 2006. The three Cobra trilogies are an ongoing series of adventure novels set in a space opera future where "Cobras", augmented supersoldiers, defend colony worlds from the overbearing Dominion of Man and from the alien Troft.

Angelmass, a black hole deep in space, emits "angels," small particles that render humans calm, reasonable, and virtually incapable of lying. The Empyrean, human colonies in the far reaches of the galaxy, has discovered the angels and the power they wield. All members of Empyrean government must carry an angel.The Earth-based Empire, the Pax, view the angels as an alien plot to subvert humanity. They dispatch Jereko Kosta, an innocent academic, to spy on the Empyrean and find out the truth about angels. With Chandris, a grifter who dogs his steps, he enlists on an "angel-hunting" ship. Close up, Kostas learns the angels may be more dangerous than the Pax fear. Before he can react, the Pax dispatches their most powerful warship to confront the Empyrean. Now, Kosta and Chandris, among the few who know the truth about the angels, stand between the Empyrean, the Pax, and war.

kinder
While this isn't one of my favorite Timothy Zahn books, it still features all of his hallmarks that make him a great sci-fi author: a lot of diverse plot threads that fit together seamlessly, some big surprises, great military strategy and tactics, an interesting world, and fair bit of suspense and action. Where this book falters is simply in its premise: everything revolves around the mysterious particles called angels which are supposed to be units of "good", which is simply unbelievable. I was expecting a big twist at the end which would have everything make sense, and the twist that was delivered was unsatisfying. Nonetheless, I've read the book twice and still found plenty to enjoy the second time.
Eng.Men
One of the best scifi books I've read in a long time. Mostly space opera but with some hard science hard enough to necessitate rereading the hard sciences passages. There's even belly-laugh humor to be found toward the end of the tale. All in all it's even better than Zahn's other good effort, Night Train to Rigel (Quadrail), my previous favorite of his novels. Don't miss either of them.
Zolorn
If you've read Timothy Zahn, you know better than to be surprised how good one of his books are... and yet, I was surprised how good this one turned out to be. The first chapter is almost a complete misdirection. You end up so utterly submerged in the world that you're caught off guard by a number of twists and find yourself needing to dig into chapter after chapter!
Jairani
I love this book (well, I love Timothy's books in general). He never disappoints.

The Pax send a civilian researcher on a covert intelligence mission to discover just what it is about "Angels" that makes people so agreeable, and so good. Meanwhile, a girl who always seems to be running from trouble (or into it), gets herself hired onto an Angel hunter (a ship that gathers "Angels"), and gets involved with the lives of the Angel hunters, and this civilian researcher.

No one quite understands what Angels are, or what they do, but a whole society has based it's government on their influence. The Pax believe they're dangerous, and are willing to send their most decorated warship to free those under their influence. The truth will surprise everyone, as will Angelmass, the white hole that the Angels come from.

A great read, thanks again, Timothy!
Braswyn
This book was pretty good (not great). It was a little lacking in Zahn's typical "take existing sci-fi technology and do things with it no-one has ever thought about", which i LOVE. But i'm glad i bought it, and you should get it.
Adrielmeena
I do love Zahn's work and I enjoyed this book. It falls into his weaker offerings, though, and it does a few things excellently and a few things not so excellently.

First, the excellent. Once he puts all the pieces in place, Zahn let's loose with a complex plot featuring political intrigue, brilliant war tactics, fascinating interplay of characters with a mess of conflicting and cooperating goals and motivations, and an emerging mystery. Well over half the book had me glued to my seat and eager to get back to Angelmass.

Second, the not so excellent. First, Zahn tries to create something of a vocabulary for this alternate culture, and it falls flat. The words and phrasings he chooses are awkward and poorly introduced, then he hits them hard for about 20 pages, after which he rarely references them. Every time his fabricated phraseology cropped up it felt stilted. Second, the exposition - like the Hand of Thrawn Cycle he takes a very long time putting all the pieces in place. My print version was 430 pages and for about the first 190, the book plods along with little mystery, little challenge, and little complexity. (As noted above, this pays big dividends as, once all the pieces are thoroughly, thoroughly in place, Zahn lets the floodgates loose and things get very exciting for the next 225 pages). It would have been better to pull forward some of the doubt/complexity/intrigue that the plot had to offer to push the plot forward sooner.

Thirdly, is the conclusion. Zahn wraps this up philosophically with some comments on good and evil and human nature. These thoughts are actually interesting, but this capstone is poorly executed. It sits like an ill-fitting cap in the last chapter, abruptly shifting in tone and subject from the prior 200 pages. It is not the culmination of a series of questions, mysteries, and inconsistencies that suddenly come into focus but rather a revelation one character pulls from his back pocket to resolve a handful of vague and unexplored questions that cropped up in the book. The final chapter itself is backwards to my mind, which I won't explain for the spoilers it would necessitate, but suffice to say Zahn explores the topic in an A -> B -> C -> D direction, resulting in groaning cheesiness and a feel of convenient deus ex machina, while a D -> C -> B -> A order would have felt organic and insightful. Missed opportunity.

All in all, a good book for Zahn fans who want more Zahn. Over half the book is his trademark pace and complex plot weaving that we've come to know and love. Not the first Zahn book I'd pick up, though.
Balladolbine
I took a “Science and Science Fiction” course at Vanderbilt during the winter quarter, in which the teacher discussed black holes, particle physics, faster-than-light travel, Hawking radiation, and other subjects in physics, which also play a large part of the story in this hard science fiction novel. It is set on the planet Seraph which shares its star system with a black hole, called “Angelmass”, which emits mysterious particles called “angels”. These particles make people reasonable, calm, honorable, and almost incapable of lying. Seraph is outside the control of Pax, a human empire, so the Pax military recruit a scientist, Jereko Kostas, to spy for them and prepare the way for an invasion. He encounters Chandris Lelasha, a young grifter fleeing her abusive lover, and they help each other. It was nice to see Zahn taking a break from writing Star Wars novels, and I enjoyed reading it.