Download Lone Wolf fb2

by Kristine L. Franklin
Download Lone Wolf fb2
Fantasy
  • Author:
    Kristine L. Franklin
  • ISBN:
    074454081X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0744540819
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Walker Books (1998)
  • Pages:
    207 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Fantasy
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1410 kb
  • ePUB format
    1717 kb
  • DJVU format
    1270 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    255
  • Formats:
    mobi azw mbr txt


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. An eleven-year-old boy who lives with his reclusive father gradually warms up to a new friend and her large.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

Kristine L. Franklin is the author of several novels for young readers, including ECLIPSE, NERD NO MORE, DOVE SONG, and the best-selling LONE WOLF, a SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL Best Book of the Year. Books by Kristine L. Franklin. Mor. rivia About Lone Wolf.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Lone Wolf by Kristine L. Franklin (2006, Paperback) at. .

SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL A SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL Best Book of the Year A Bank Street College Best Book of the Year "A tender tale of loss and the redeeming power of love. The writing is sure; the dovetailing of grief and memory with the events of the plot is impeccable. Readers won't forget Perry and his father as they rejoin the human race. Franklin (Paperback) at the best online . Pages are reasonably tanned. by Kristine L. Franklin

Pages are reasonably tanned. Other: Living up in the north woods, Perry Dubois and his dad don't see other people much. Franklin LONE WOLF 1st Ed. HC Book. Lone Wolf-ExLibrary by Franklin, Kristine L. " Free US Delivery ISBN: 1564029352.

Lone Wolf, a realistic fiction book by Kristine Franklin, is an excellent read. It is about Perry, a bright young man whose family has been torn apart by tragedy. Coping with a silent, hardworking father and an absent mother, Perry quietly lives close to nature in northern Minnesota, homeschooling himself without much input from his father. When a new family moves in to the house on some nearby property, Perry finds himself learning how to cope with new situations and the emotions they evoke. The plot and character development in Lone Wold is deep and powerful.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Kristine L Franklin books online. Notify me. Lone Wolf. Kristine L. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Franklin, Lone Wolf Quiz Number: 18500 Candlewick Press,1997 ISBN 1-56402-935-2; LCCN 220 Pages Book Level: . Interest Level: MG. correspondence course a class that a student completes at home and returns by mail to a school for grading. instinct a natural unlearned behavior.

Books by Kristine L. Franklin and Joe Baker. Franklin 6. Sort by. Number of Resources Number of Awards Book Title Year Published Word Count Reading Level: ATOS® Reading Level: Lexile®. Browse books by Kristine L. Franklin and Kris Waldherr. Franklin and Paul Lee. 2 Resources1 Award. The Old, Old Man and the Very Little Boy. Franklin and Terea Shaffer.

"An eleven-year-old boy who lives with his reclusive father gradually warms up to a new friend and her large, loud, and loving family. A tightly narrated story about coming to terms with past tragedies." — SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL A SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL Best Book of the YearA Bank Street College Best Book of the Year"A tender tale of loss and the redeeming power of love. . . . The writing is sure; the dovetailing of grief and memory with the events of the plot is impeccable. Readers won't forget Perry and his father as they rejoin the human race." — KIRKUS REVIEWS

Windforge
Great book! Great condition! Fast shipping.
Fecage
When Perry Dubois was eight something terrible happened to his family and his parents, not being able to deal with the situation, divorced. Perry and his dad stayed together and moved to the woods country of north Minnesota, near Canada. Three years have gone by and Perry is now eleven. The boy has done everything he can to push that earlier, bad time from his consciousness. He and his father are both silent types, very quiet, not talking even when their emotions threaten to flood them. Perry's favorite place is a cave hidden in the woods. He has decorated the walls with charcoal drawings, in imitation of European stone-age paintings. From the caves entrance he observes nature, learning the calls of different animals and watching their behavior. Most of all Perry wants to see a wolf, which he has only heard howling from far off in the distance. From the caves entrance Perry can also see a house, but it has been vacant for the whole three years he has been in the neighborhood. Then one day a moving van pulls up and the Pestalozzi family arrives. There are five children in the family and the four oldest are all girls. The youngest, Ian, is not much more than a baby. The oldest, Willow, is about Perry's age, but who wants to be friends with a girl? Fate leads Perry and Willow to meet, but their outlook on life is very different. How will Perry respond to this breathlessly talkative girl?

This is a story about psychological hurt, living with pain and the slow process of healing. The tale deals with strong emotions, yet Franklin manages to avoid descending into melodrama.

The issue of divorce is dealt with sensitively. Franklin does not point the finger of blame, but nor does she avoid the notion that our actions have consequences.

The idea of individual strength is depicted, but this is balanced against man's need for friendship.

Religion is touched on briefly, although it is not a major theme.

The book is written from Perry's perspective, in first person narrative, so we get to know the boy's character intimately. We see him struggle through a slow process of change. We come to like him for his strength and his friendliness, but also in his weakness. He is a friend anyone would be glad to know.

Willow is a bright, happy, friendly girl whose charms are hard to resist. She, and all of the Pestalozzis, reveal to us the benefits of friendship and social support.

This novel will certainly appeal to boys, but girls will also find much to enjoy in it. There are no dull spots in the story, though this is not a tale of high adventure. Franklin writes in a paced, friendly way.

This is one of the better children's novels I have read recently and I am happy to give it five stars.
Stanober
When Perry Dubois was eight something terrible happened to his family and his parents, not being able to deal with the situation, divorced. Perry and his dad stayed together and moved to the woods country of north Minnesota, near Canada. Three years have gone by and Perry is now eleven. The boy has done everything he can to push that earlier, bad time from his consciousness. He and his father are both silent types, very quiet, not talking even when their emotions threaten to flood them. Perry's favorite place is a cave hidden in the woods. He has decorated the walls with charcoal drawings, in imitation of European stone-age paintings. From the caves entrance he observes nature, learning the calls of different animals and watching their behavior. Most of all Perry wants to see a wolf, which he has only heard howling from far off in the distance. From the caves entrance Perry can also see a house, but it has been vacant for the whole three years he has been in the neighborhood. Then one day a moving van pulls up and the Pestalozzi family arrives. There are five children in the family and the four oldest are all girls. The youngest, Ian, is not much more than a baby. The oldest, Willow, is about Perry's age, but who wants to be friends with a girl? Fate leads Perry and Willow to meet, but their outlook on life is very different. How will Perry respond to this breathlessly talkative girl?

This is a story about psychological hurt, living with pain and the slow process of healing. The tale deals with strong emotions, yet Franklin manages to avoid descending into melodrama.

The issue of divorce is dealt with sensitively. Franklin does not point the finger of blame, but nor does she avoid the notion that our actions have consequences.

The idea of individual strength is depicted, but this is balanced against man's need for friendship.

Religion is touched on briefly, although it is not a major theme.

The book is written from Perry's perspective, in first person narrative, so we get to know the boy's character intimately. We see him struggle through a slow process of change. We come to like him for his strength and his friendliness, but also in his weakness. He is a friend anyone would be glad to know.

Willow is a bright, happy, friendly girl whose charms are hard to resist. She, and all of the Pestalozzis, reveal to us the benefits of friendship and social support.

This novel will certainly appeal to boys, but girls will also find much to enjoy in it. There are no dull spots in the story, though this is not a tale of high adventure. Franklin writes in a paced, friendly way.

This is one of the better children's novels I have read recently and I am happy to give it five stars.