Download Earth Magic fb2

by Cory Panshin,Alexei Panshin
Download Earth Magic fb2
Fantasy
  • Author:
    Cory Panshin,Alexei Panshin
  • ISBN:
    0417051905
  • ISBN13:
    978-0417051901
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Littlehampton Book Services Ltd; New edition edition (August 14, 1980)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Fantasy
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1945 kb
  • ePUB format
    1933 kb
  • DJVU format
    1818 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    984
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf mobi docx


Original Publication: Ace Books, 1978. com, Inc. ePub ISBN: 978-1-59729-084-5. Kindle ISBN: 978-1-59729-006-7.

Original Publication: Ace Books, 1978. com and the ES design are registered trademarks of ElectricStory. This novella is a work of fiction. All characters, events, organizations, and locales are either the product of the author’s imagination or used fictitiously to convey a sense of realism.

by Alexei and Cory Panshin. Neither swords-and-sorcery nor Tolkienesque romance, Earth Magic presents an archaic world in the tradition of the Northern European epic poems. by Alexei and Cory Panshin. Haldane, the young son of the Get warlord Black Morca, encounters a witch in the woods who unsettles his composure with prophecies of strange events and major changes.

Alexei Panshin, Cory Panshin. From the point it left the last trees on the far side of the Nestorian village in the valley, through the settled fields, and up the hill where nothing taller than a berry bush was allowed to stand,. the road ran under the eyes of the tower in the corner of the palisade. Both dun and tower were there before Morca. It was not because the hill was high and the fort safe that Morca had taken possession of the dun, nor yet for its sweet spring or its closeness to the Western Kingdoms.

Earth Magic' (275 p. was published by Ace Books in October, 1978. The cover artwork is by Boris Vallejo

Earth Magic' (275 p. The cover artwork is by Boris Vallejo. The novel takes place in a standard-issue medieval fantasy kingdom, where the teenaged Haldane is the only son of the King of the Tribe of the Gets, and the Ruler of the Land of Nestor: Black Morca. Like his previous novel, ‘Rite of Passage’, ‘Earth Magic’ is another novel by author Panshin (here assisted by his wife, Cory) that focuses on an adolescent’s journey to adulthood. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but ‘Earth’ is one of the worst fantasy novels I’ve ever read.

In Earth Magic, Alexei and Cory Panshin (Hugo-winning authors of The World Beyond the Hill ) create a mysterious .

In Earth Magic, Alexei and Cory Panshin (Hugo-winning authors of The World Beyond the Hill ) create a mysterious world of shifting realities. The prose style of ‘Earth Magic’ is stridently wooden and stilted, veering within the same page between a faux-‘Old Legende’ phrasing devoid of contractions and colloquialisms; to figurative phrases reminiscent of the more cumbersome types of New Wave sf writing.

In Earth Magic, Alexei and Cory Panshin (Hugo winning authors of The World Beyond the Hill) create a mysterious world of shifting realities, arcane traditions and memorable characters. Haldane, son of the Get warlord Black Morca must flee for his life through a familiar landscape turned strangely alien, aided by a wizard of uncertain abilities and the hazardous favor of the Goddess Libera.

A number of Alexei Panshin's books (including The World Beyond the Hill) are presently being republished by Phoenix Pick, an imprint of Arc Manor Publishers. Alexei Panshin; Cory Panshin (1978). p. 275. ISBN 0-441-18120-1.

Summary Bibliography: Alexei Panshin. Translation: Rite de passage (2016)

Summary Bibliography: Alexei Panshin. Author: Alexei Panshin Author Record 44. Legal Name: Panshin, Alexis Adams. Translation: Rite de passage (2016). Earth Magic (1978) with Cory Panshin also appeared as: Translation: Sortilèges de la Terre (1984).

ISBN 10: 0441181201 ISBN 13: 9780441181209. Publisher: Ace Books, 1978. First book publication. Heroic fantasy novel, first serialized in Fantastic Magazine (April, July, September 1973) as "The Son of Black Morca. Iconic Boris cover art.

First book publication. Details (if other): Cancel.

Reprints the Ace book. Heroic fantasy novel, first serialized in Fantastic Magazine (April / July / September 1973) as "The Son of Black Morca." Iconic Boris cover art. Haldane, son of the Get warlord Black Morca must flee for his life through a familiar landscape turned strangely alien, aided by a wizard of uncertain abilities and the hazardous favor of the Goddess Libera. His perilous journey will take him to a final battle amidst the standing stones of power of Stone Heath where he will discover his true destiny.

Reggy
'Earth Magic' (275 pp.) was published by Ace Books in October, 1978. The cover artwork is by Boris Vallejo.

The novel takes place in a standard-issue medieval fantasy kingdom, where the teenaged Haldane is the only son of the King of the Tribe of the Gets, and the Ruler of the Land of Nestor: Black Morca. Black Morca is not the brightest of individuals – indeed, every Get is quite stupid– but his strength and brute cunning have enlarged the boundaries of his kingdom.

As ‘Earth’ opens, Black Morca has made an alliance with Lothar of Chastain, who arrives at Morca’s castle with his daughter, Princess Marthe, who is engaged to Haldane. The alliance is one of convenience for Black Morca, as it will enable him to focus his efforts on the conquest of adjoining lands. Neither Haldane nor Marthe are particularly enthused over their nuptials, but Haldane sees it as one small way to become closer to his indifferent, preoccupied father.

However, even as the wedding celebration takes place, discord flares. Alliances are undone, and Haldane must flee for his life from the castle of Black Morca, accompanied by the court wizard, Oliver. Overnight, Haldane goes from being the heir to the kingdom, to a hunted outcast sneaking furtively through the woodlands.

Haldane’s sole hope for survival is to escape the boundaries of Nestor and travel to his grandfather’s kingdom of Angrim. But Haldane discovers that he must deal with another, supernatural party as he struggles to avoid capture: the Earth Goddess Libera has marked him for purposes of her own……

Like his previous novel, ‘Rite of Passage’, ‘Earth Magic’ is another novel by author Panshin (here assisted by his wife, Cory) that focuses on an adolescent’s journey to adulthood. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but ‘Earth’ is one of the worst fantasy novels I’ve ever read.

The prose style of ‘Earth Magic’ is stridently wooden and stilted, veering within the same page between a faux-‘Old Legende’ phrasing devoid of contractions and colloquialisms; to figurative phrases reminiscent of the more cumbersome types of New Wave sf writing.

For example, when Ivor is knocked out, he simply isn’t knocked out; no, rather: 'Ivor went wandering in night realms.'

Still other segments of the narrative clumsily mix clichéd, empty phrasing and awkward syntax:

'He had let himself forget that narrow practice was his failing and practiced narrowly. He had lost himself in study, lost himself in thought and question, paused for a moment in dream while he wondered where his youth had flown and wither he was bound. To what end had he been born ? And while he was occupied so in reverie, he had lost his balance.'

'Oliver had tricked Oliver and received a blow from Oliver that had set Oliver down. Where was order ? His world was broken. His mind ran on its own heels in subtle circles.'

The novel’s writing reaches a nadir in the last chapter, where a climactic confrontation between Haldane and his enemies is made tedious and numbing by the determined use of portentous, self-consciously ‘heroic’ prose.

My opinion: ‘Earth Magic’ is a novel to avoid.
Thetalen
This looks for much of its length like a standard revenge novel, set in what may be an alternate-history version of the European Dark Ages, or possibly a post-Holocaust milieu: either way, I found my acquaintance with European history grounded me pretty well in its action and politics. And for a long time I wondered whether the fantasy element was needed at all. But the story took turns that kept surprising me, until things fell into place in a mystically gripping climax, to end at last on a definite note of hope and understanding. The prose I found frequently verging on poetry, with many startlingly effective turns of phrase.
As a septuagenarian, I am in the stage of trying to weed as many books as possible out of my shelves; but EARTH MAGIC I plan to keep for possible rereading.