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by Chaim Potok
Download In the Beginning fb2
Romantic Suspense
  • Author:
    Chaim Potok
  • ISBN:
    0449229807
  • ISBN13:
    978-0449229804
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Fawcett (August 12, 1976)
  • Subcategory:
    Romantic Suspense
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1744 kb
  • ePUB format
    1883 kb
  • DJVU format
    1828 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    112
  • Formats:
    mobi lrf docx lit


Published by The Random House Publishing Group.

Published by The Random House Publishing Group. Published in the United States by Fawcett Books, an imprint of The Random House Publishing Group, a division of Random House, In. New York, and simultaneously in Canada by Random House of Canada Limited, Toronto. Fawcett is a registered trademark and the Fawcett. colophon is a trademark of Random House, Inc.

Is it your book, Mama? She nodded slowly. But I never saw it in the house. I have books in my closet, David. The question sent a tremor through her. She put the book on her lap and gazed at me. Her wide dark eyes were suddenly brimming with tears

Is it your book, Mama? She nodded slowly. From the years I went to school in Vienna. Her wide dark eyes were suddenly brimming with tears. I had touched the secret pool of sorrow within her. She nodded and turned her head away from me. I went down to the lake, wondering where in our apartment she kept the photograph I had seen in Mr. Bader’s study and which of the faces in the photograph belonged to my father’s dead brother.

Chaim Potok was born in New York City in 1929. Potok’s first novel, The Chosen, published in 1967, received the Edward Lewis Wallant Memorial Book Award and was nominated for the National Book Award. He graduated from Yeshiva University and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, was ordained as a rabbi, and earned his PhD in philosophy from the University of Pennsylvania. He is author of eight novels, including In the Beginning and My Name Is Asher Lev, and Wanderings, a history of the Jews.

Chaim Potok (February 17, 1929 – July 23, 2002) was an American author and rabbi. His first book The Chosen (1967), was listed on The New York Times’ best seller list for 39 weeks and sold more than 3,400,000 copies

Chaim Potok (February 17, 1929 – July 23, 2002) was an American author and rabbi. His first book The Chosen (1967), was listed on The New York Times’ best seller list for 39 weeks and sold more than 3,400,000 copies. Herman Harold Potok was born in Bronx, New York, to Benjamin Max (died 1958) and Mollie (née Friedman) Potok (died 1985), Jewish immigrants from Poland. He was the oldest of four children, all of whom either became or married rabbis. His Hebrew name was Chaim Tzvi (חיים צבי).

In the Beginning book. Another absolutely remarkable book by Chaim Potok. David Lurie learns that all beginnings are hard  . As in most of the other books I've read from him this follows a young extremely intelligent student who is studying Talmud and other Jewish teaching and eventually questioning some of what he has learned. My suspicion is that much of what Potok writes about mirrors his own life because the extent of his knowledge regarding the subject is astounding.

He was rarely without a book in his hands from that time on; and it was almost always a novel or a collection of stories. You used to look like that when you studied Chumash, Saul said. If a bomb fell in the street he wouldn’t hear it. He read as he ate; he read as he walked in the streets; he read as he rode the buses to and from school; he read in the bathroom. He told me one night that he thought he might like to teach English literature.

The renowned author of nine books for adults, including The Chosen, turns his writing toward young adults in this collection of six stories in which children face moments of crisis or grief and see their world anew. In the title story, Zebra learns to use. Tales of the Hasidim, Vols 1-2. by Martin Buber · Bonny V. Fetterman · Chaim Potok. He als. ore about Chaim Potok. Category: Literary Fiction.

Potok began his career as an author and novelist in 1967 with the publication of The Chosen, which stands as the first book from a major publisher to portray Orthodox Judaism in the . Chaim Potok was born in the Bronx in 1929.

Potok began his career as an author and novelist in 1967 with the publication of The Chosen, which stands as the first book from a major publisher to portray Orthodox Judaism in the United States. With its story about the friendship between the son of a Hasidic rabbi and a more secularly-minded Jewish boy in Brooklyn, The Chosen established Potok's reputation. Chaim Potok was born in the Bronx in 1929 ned his P. in philosophy from the University of Pennsylvania.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Vintage paperback

Jeb
I have always loved Chaim Potok's writing. I think I have read them all. I am re-reading In the Beginning aloud to my husband, and it's been so long since I read it the first time, that it is like starting over again, and just as meaningful the second time. There are so many themes to explore in this work - persecution against the Jewish people; struggles of immigrants; man's inhumanity to man; the challenge of being a precocious child; Max Lurie's extended depression over his perceived failures; Jewish misconceptions of Christianity and vice versa; religious ritual vs. true faith; and much more. This story, told through the eyes of an extraordinary child, is eye-opening to those of us who have not had to live though war, depression, and persecution.
Mavegelv
As in his other novels such as The Chosen and Asher Lev, Chaim Potok writes about growing up Orthodox in 20th century America. Potok who was initially educated in Yeshiva University an (modern) Orthodox seminary, later transferred and was ordained as a Conservative rabbi at the JewishTheological Seminary JTS. His gradual transition from traditional orthodox education to embracing "modern" ie "critical" scholarship is reflected in his protagonists, here David Lurie (and earlier in The Chosen by the Malters)
Potok documents his characters struggles but needs to justify his characters choices by implying that David's Orthodox Talmud teacher R Scharfman (a thinly veiled reference to R J Soloveitchik of YU) encouraged his choice of academic Bible study (despite recognizing that it would undermine his Orthodox heritage)
Somehow Potok seems to imply that the anti Semitic bullying that Davie faces at the hand of his gentile neighbor is no different than the schoolyard bullying he later faces at the hand of his classmate. It's unclear what exactly Potoks point is meant to be and he leaves both storylines incomplete.
Potok does an admirable job of describing the trials and tribulations of his characters but one can't help but sense Potoks writes from a need tto justify his own personal life choices
Talrajas
The book is vintage Potok: big-hearted, with an outsized respect, especially in contrast to these days, for religious (or any other) scholarship and a sense that the physically frail among us may have more to offer than the big, brawny and beautiful who are usually elevated by society. If you love character in your novels, you will love Potok and this book. It provides a look inside a very insular community during a particularly difficult time: the Depression that occurred shortly after many of them arrived in America to take refuge from pogroms in Europe; the nascent emergence of the state of Israel; and the Nazi holocaust. It's a coming of age story for the main character, for America, and for the Jewish community.

But the Kindle edition: oh, my. There must be 500 missing periods in the book. The word "life" twice appears as Ufe, and there are a number of other typos that seem to be the result of using OCR scanning to bring the book to an e-Book audience. It is readable, but you do sometimes have to backtrack to supply the missing periods. It's great to have older, wonderful books available electronically. I would like to hope the publishers will eventually take the time to honor the e-Book versions with adequate copy-editing. But I won't hold my breath.
Mpapa
Chaim Potok is a master. This is a story of growing up, of facing fear and disillusionment, of appreciating and critiquing one's own subculture. It is a book that could only arise out of a psychologically, sociologically, spiritually, and historically informed mind.
ALAN
The growing up of an extremely gifted (of course) scholar who also suffers from a physical deformity ... and ultimately has to chose a different path of religious study.
Beydar
Still reading - but a good account of growing up in a Jewish migrant household in the early part of the 20th century from the sensitive eyes of a very bright boy.
Saithi
Not as gripping as his other books. There are three stories here and though one can see the connections, I never really got involved with any one of them.
We see Davita grown up but she's nowhere near as interesting as watching her grow up in the thirties.
Chaim Potok's writing is of an unparalleled . It is the Mysteryhow he can put so much unresolved tension in such simple seeming scenes such as sitting in a room or walking down a path. One of the modern era's top most writers.