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by Parker J. Palmer
Download To Know as We Are Known: Education as a Spiritual Journey fb2
Religious Studies
  • Author:
    Parker J. Palmer
  • ISBN:
    0060664517
  • ISBN13:
    978-0060664510
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    HarperOne; Reprint edition (May 28, 1993)
  • Pages:
    130 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Religious Studies
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1685 kb
  • ePUB format
    1364 kb
  • DJVU format
    1842 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    637
  • Formats:
    mobi doc lrf lrf


Palmer's book, ostensibly about education and learning, contains truths that call one to introspection regarding the . It was as if Mr. Palmer looked at my life mixed with playing the student and the teacher role and said, "I know exactly what you mean

Palmer's book, ostensibly about education and learning, contains truths that call one to introspection regarding the whole of life. The book has definitely influenced me to change the objective and methods of my teaching. But its value in my personal life cannot be measured. Palmer looked at my life mixed with playing the student and the teacher role and said, "I know exactly what you mean. As for occasionally feeling perplexed, I think I was surprised by how often I felt like the text was non-succinct even thought it has a relatively short page count and narrow focus. I had to fight moments when I was tempted to think, "Yes, you said that; please move o.

This primer on authentic education explores how mind and heart can work together in the learning process

This primer on authentic education explores how mind and heart can work together in the learning process. Parker Palmer has created a truly outstanding work with To Know as We Are Known.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Palmer makes a strong case for the role that a teacher’s own spiritual formation plays in their being able to do their job well. Start by marking To Know as We Are Known: A Spirituality of Education as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. He looks at ways that spiritual virtues (humility and faith, reverence without idolatry, love and grace) are practically beneficial.

contents: introduction · parker j. palmer – life · education as a spiritual journey · parker palmer – knowing, teaching and learning · participating in a community of truth · creating space for learning · attending to the inner life o. .

This primer on authentic education explores how mind and heart can work together in the learning process.

Parker J. Palmer, a popular speaker and educator, is also the author of The Active Life. He received the 1993 award for "Outstanding Service to Higher Education" from the Council of Independent Colleges. Parker J. Palmer is a highly respected writer, lecturer, teacher, and activist. His work speaks deeply to people from many walks of life, including public schools, college and universities, religious institutions, corporations, foundations, and grass-roots organizations. The Leadership Project, a 1998 survey of 10,000 American educators, named him one of the thirty most influential senior leaders in higher education and one of ten key "agenda-setters" of the past decade.

Education as Spiritual Formation. Bibliographic information. 17. The Teaching Behind the Teaching. To Know as We Are Known: A Spirituality of Education.

After all, the book is about the spiritual dimension of education, and conventional wisdom tells us that .

After all, the book is about the spiritual dimension of education, and conventional wisdom tells us that educators range from indifferent to cynical on matters of the spirit. But now, I am delighted that To Know as We Are Known has reached a wider and more diverse audience than I had thought possible.

This primer on authentic education explores how mind and heart can work together in the learning process. Moving beyond the bankruptcy of our current model of education, Parker Palmer finds the soul of education through a lifelong cultivation of the wisdom each of us possesses and can share to benefit others.


Karon
Palmer's book, ostensibly about education and learning, contains truths that call one to introspection regarding the whole of life. The book has definitely influenced me to change the objective and methods of my teaching. But its value in my personal life cannot be measured. Palmer's teaching regarding the communal nature of truth and the necessity of obedience to that which is learned forces deep introspection. What words of knowledge have I let fall to the ground in my search for the next great idea or intellectual stimulant? Introspection on this matter brings me to understand that entering troth with knowledge frees me to live simply, in community with mankind. Dave
Мох
This is the first book I've read by Parker Palmer although I've read essays, chapter excerpts, and several authors who cite him several times over the years. I was excited to have a full work by Mr. Palmer to take in and I found it exceptional even if I perhaps found myself perplexed from time to time (I'm sure Mr. Palmer would say that's a good thing).

Immediately, Mr. Palmer presents a central metaphor of learning to do life "whole" by opening both the mind's eye which sees "a world of fact and reason" and the eye of the heart to see "a world warmed and transformed by the power of love." (Intro) A teacher, then, uses both eyes and becomes a "mediator between the knower and the unknown." (29) All throughout the book Palmer lends sound wisdom and keen insight into teaching in meaning-filled and meaning-creating ways. He reminds the reader of the need for a learning space to be one that has openness, boundaries, and hospitality. (70) Conventional classrooms offer hurdles of "hidden curriculum" to rethink such as focusing on someone else's (teacher's) vision of reality, a hesitation to be held up for inspection and scrutiny as the teacher / authority / expert, and a structure set up to build isolation easily and often. (34-39) No-brainer wisdom? Perhaps, yet Mr Parker presents these pieces in a whole that is unified in tone and written in accessible, beautiful prose that won't leave the reader saying, "I already knew that!" but instead, "Of course!"

This quote particularly struck me as something I've articulated several times in my life: "Several times in my teaching career I have become someone else's student, and each time the experience has had a marked impact on my own teaching. I was forcefully reminded that education is not just a cognitive process, not just the transmission of facts and reasons." (115) This duality is yet again a way Palmer hopes people will see the value in being a "whole person" seeing and living with both eyes open. It was as if Mr. Palmer looked at my life mixed with playing the student and the teacher role and said, "I know exactly what you mean."

As for occasionally feeling perplexed, I think I was surprised by how often I felt like the text was non-succinct even thought it has a relatively short page count and narrow focus. I had to fight moments when I was tempted to think, "Yes, you said that; please move on." One example is the story of Abba Felix which, while a great story, runs through the book more like a thick scratchy rope than a thread and while I was captivated by the many examples and stories in chapters 5-6 I had to push myself in earlier chapters. With that said, there are too many gems in this book to dismiss it as rough. Thanks for reading. thelifemosaic
Ramsey`s
In a time when the morale of the teaching profession in most countries is at an all time low, Palmer's book stand out as a beacon to warn and draw our attention to what education is truly about. The story about Abba Felix and that there are `no more words nowadays' stands at the heart of this book. In this short story about a Desert Father, Palmer has developed a spirituality of education in which obedience to God's words will lead to spiritual formation of the teacher and the student.

First, Palmer rightly pointed out that objectivism and the pursuit of knowledge without reflection is dangerous. His illustration with the Manhattan project is instructive. However, he should have included the societal, economic and cultural influences in his argument. One of the problems with education today is that instead of being a process of `reunification and reconstruction of broken selves and world', it became a means to obtaining `paper'qualifications. Education has been hijacked to be an instrument in which students can achieve economic success and teachers became clogs in the machine that produce thousands of graduates annually who are only skilled in passing examinations.

Second, he mentioned `a learning space' as an antidote to `objectivist' teaching methods. This learning space has openness, boundaries and hospitality. I wonder how Palmer would translate that into an Asian context. Openness, boundaries and hospitality will be difficult in a culture of shame (`saving face') and hierarchal respect for elders, social ranks and qualifications.

Finally, `transformation of teaching must begin in the transformed heart of the teacher'. Palmer listed the disciplines of studying widely, silence, solitude and prayer as important in bringing about this transformation. However Palmer painted a bland picture of a `generic' God as the focus of these disciplines. I would that he be more Trinitarian in his approach.
Nidor
I'm not finished reading yet, but so far, it's one of the most insightful books I've read in a very long time. It requires focus on my part - it's deep - but it is well worth it. I think it could be a helpful book for every teacher - faithful, faithless, and any/every faith. If you want to deepen your understanding of education, and life, read this book.
Ganthisc
Any education is good, respecting that the learner can learn, thus spiritual, because the teacher's mind is open to the fact that he can.
It is Love that teaches, is willing to teach, and puts the teacher in a leading, guiding position. The innocent respect that respect is shown them and learn. All education coursework should include Parker Palmer's work. He is very aware that there is much good out there, happening all the time, something much larger than he. He knows that he doesn't have to give it a name or verbally worship it, but DO it and GIVE it.
Mr.Bean
Palmer speaks to my soul and hopefully to all who touch the lives of young people! I've read several of his books and by far, this is the most inspirational.
Flathan
Fan of Parker Palmer. This book was as personal like most of his writing. Thus, it fit with the subject matter of finding the personal in teaching. Will be a book I'll return to often as I enter into conversation with Palmer.