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by Fisher Humphreys
Download The Way We Were: How Southern Baptist Theology Has Changed and What It Means to Us All fb2
Religious Studies
  • Author:
    Fisher Humphreys
  • ISBN:
    1573123765
  • ISBN13:
    978-1573123761
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Smyth & Helwys Pub; Revised edition (March 1, 2002)
  • Pages:
    145 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Religious Studies
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1969 kb
  • ePUB format
    1213 kb
  • DJVU format
    1401 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    952
  • Formats:
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The Way We Were is a book about the theological dimensions of the controversy that shook the foundations of the Southern Baptist Convention during the decades of the 80s and 90s. That controversy began at th. .

The Way We Were is a book about the theological dimensions of the controversy that shook the foundations of the Southern Baptist Convention during the decades of the 80s and 90s. That controversy began at the national level, far from most Baptist laypeople, trickled down to the state Baptist conventions, where it included a much broader audience, and now has moved into local churches. I grew up in a Southern Baptist Church that had been indoctrinated by the "new" SBC regime of the 80's and 90's Читать весь отзыв.

The Way We Were book. This book examines the controversy which has divided the 15 million. It is difficult to summarize what Humphreys writes in TWWW because the entire book is largely a summary of the historical theology of Southern Baptists and the influences that brought said theology about. Having grown up, received my higher education within, and been ordained by that denomination, I find this historical tour to be bittersweet. I, personally, regret the direction the Southern Baptists decided to go, but I also see within these pages a little more about the concerns on the other side. Related Subjects:(5). Southern Baptist Convention - Doctrines.

The Way We Were is a book about the theological dimensions of the controversy which shook the .

The Way We Were is a book about the theological dimensions of the controversy which shook the foundations of the Southern Baptist Convention during the decades o.

Another great book by the same author is The Way We Were, How Southern Baptist Theology Has Changed and .

Another great book by the same author is The Way We Were, How Southern Baptist Theology Has Changed and What it Means to Us All. If your church is having problems with Calvinism or with "Reformed Theology", then these two books are "must reads". 15 people found this helpful. As a result of this phone call, Fisher Humphreys joined with Paul E. Robertson to write a short, but powerful volume which explores both tradition and scripture in considering whether Calvinism should be part of Baptist churches. Humphreys and Robertson begin by using Calvin’s own words and Calvinist sources to summarize Calvinism.

The way we were by Fisher Humphreys.

how Southern Baptist theology has changed and what it means to us all. by Fisher Humphreys. Published 1994 by McCracken Press in New York. Baptists, Church controversies, Doctrines, History, Southern Baptist Convention.

Download PDF book format. n-us -. Library of Congress Call Number: BX6462.

The Way We Were: How Southern Baptist Theology Has Changed and What It Means to Us All: ISBN 9781573123761 (978-1-57312-376-1) Softcover, Smyth & Helwys Pub, 2002. La Naturaleza De Dios (Biblioteca De Doctrina Cristiana, 4). ISBN 9780311091140 (978-0-311-09114-0) Softcover, Casa Bautista De Publicaciones, 1986.

The Way We Were: How Southern Baptist Theology Has Changed and what it Means to Us Al. Smyth & Helwys, 2002. ISBN 1573123765] He also has been called "one of the foremost interpreters of the New Testament among Baptists in the twentieth century. At the Louisville seminary he held the prestigious James Buchanan Harrison Chair of New Testament Theology.

Frank Stagg is included in various lists of distinguished twentieth century Baptist theologians: E. Y. Mullins, W.The Way We Were: How Southern Baptist Theology Has Changed and what it Means to Us All. T. Connor, W. O. Carver, Frank Stagg, W. W. Stevens, Dale Moody, Dallas Roark, James Wm. McClendon, Morris Ashcraft, Frank Tupper, Warren McWilliams, A. J. Conyers, and Curtis Freeman. He also has been called "one of the foremost interpreters of the New Testament among Baptists in the twentieth century.

"The Way We Were" is a book about the theological dimensions of the controversy which shook the foundations of the Southern Baptist Convention during the decades of the 80s and 90s. That controversy began at the national level, far from most Baptist laypeople, trickled down to the state Baptist conventions, where it included a much broader audience, and now has moved into local churches where the pain, in some ways, is more sever than it was at either the national or state levels. This revision of the 1994 book could not have come at a more appropriate time for many Baptist churches. It ought to be required reading for every pulpit search committee. . . . I sincerely wish that some rich brothers or sisters, fundamentalist or moderate, conservative or liberal, would come forth today and pay to have "The Way We Were" sent to every Baptist in America.

--Walter B. Shurden from the Foreword


Puchock
I really appreciated the way The Way We Were: How Southern Baptist Theology has Changed and What it Means to Us All (TWWW) for the way the material was organized. The book was written during the early digestion period after the current crop of leadership took over the Southern Baptist Convention from the so-called moderates (often called “liberals” by this new group) who led this large non-Catholic group throughout most of its existence. In some ways, this take-over was a “sea change;” in other ways, it was a return to what many thought the convention (the national organization of cooperating Southern Baptist churches) should have been.

I like the organization of TWWW because it doesn’t start off with the controversy. It takes a historical journey through Baptist beliefs as shared with: 1) all of Christendom; 2) Protestant churches; 3) most Baptists, and 4) with revivalist Christians. From this discussion of common ground, Fisher Humphreys notes that there are six minority traditions which inform or influence Baptist beliefs throughout the history of the convention: 1) Anabaptist beliefs (those who think Christians should be a “sect” rather than a society, Christians should never go to war, and Christians should share all possessions communally); 2) Calvinist beliefs (total depravity of humanity and double predestination (removing humanity’s free will); 3) Landmark beliefs (Baptists are not Protestants but go back via various non-mainstream religious groups to Jesus and the local church should not cooperate with other churches with a large infrastructure, as well as the Lord’s Supper should only be taken in one’s local congregation); 4) Deeper Life beliefs (that believers need to find a secret or key to victorious living that isn’t automatically there); 5) Fundamentalist beliefs (that the Bible is also a science and history book, as well as inerrant in the original manuscripts, and that Jesus will have a literal one-thousand year reign on earth); and 6) Progressive beliefs (woman should be able to be in pastoral leadership, the Bible should be studied critically, and education should be exploration rather than indoctrination). The book only critiques these beliefs by pointing out ways these differ from the majority tradition and explaining what would be lost if any of these minority traditions was to fully supplant the majority tradition. Then, the book concludes by examining what could happen both negatively and positively if the majority tradition adapts to much to these minority positions.

TWWW is insightful and descriptive. It does not attempt to say that one group or another is wrong. Rather, the author questions what might be gained or lost in each set of ideas. The closest thing to a “judgmental” statement was his assessment of the new leadership of the convention (with which I agree) in stating that they will be less conservative rather than more conservative in the future. Since the diminishment of the idea of “priesthood of the believer,” the reduction of congregational decision-making, the loss of the principle of separation of church and state, and the imposition of creeds other than the Bible means that the new leadership doesn’t value these classic traditions. “To be conservative is to know, love, and transmit your traditions. In the new Convention, four valuable beliefs will be lost from the Southern Baptist heritage, a fact which conservatives must regret.” (p. 160)

With regard to specific content, I liked his statement about eschatology (the study of last things, essentially, the end of the world): “The diversity of beliefs about how the world will end should not distract our attention from the more fundamental fact, which is that Baptists share with all Christians the conviction that they are entitled to live in hope because the future belongs to God just as the past and the present do.” (p. 19) He touched on the same subject a little more pointedly when he noted, “As one popular phrase has it, when it comes to the return of Christ, it is best to serve on the welcoming committee and to avoid the planning committee.” (p. 116)

It is difficult to summarize what Humphreys writes in TWWW because the entire book is largely a summary of the historical theology of Southern Baptists and the influences that brought said theology about. Having grown up, received my higher education within, and been ordained by that denomination, I find this historical tour to be bittersweet. I, personally, regret the direction the Southern Baptists decided to go, but I also see within these pages a little more about the concerns on the “other” side. I recommend this work to anyone who wants to understand what happened to Southern Baptists in the last few decades of the 20th century, but it is, at best, of limited interest to non-Baptists.
Samardenob
Outline of the changes that occurred in the 80s. Helpful for those of us younger at that time and unaware of what was occurring
Elizabeth
I believe most Southern Baptists would be enlightened by reading this book. The author discusses what Southern Baptists have in common with all Christians followed by the commonalities with other Protestant denominations such as Methodists and Presbyterians. He then elaborates on the distinctive Southern Baptists beliefs and practices prior to 1979. He also details a number of minority views which have appeared among Southern Baptists over the years. In 1979 the Southern Baptist Convention came under the control of the Conservative element of the convention and has continued to be thus dominated. During this period many of the members of the Moderate element have formed another Baptist organization called the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship.
Having laid this groundwork, the author then talks about what has changed among Southern Baptists since 1979 and what other changes are likely in the near future.
Although he does express his own opinion at times about some controversal matters and one can detect whether he leans to the moderate or conservative view, he is able to keep his presentation factual and I believe unbiased.
Saithinin
This is such a helpful book. It is typical of Dr. Humphreys to be kind and unfailingly fair to those who are theological opponents (he would never use the term "enemies") He always writes as inclusively as possible in order the see the big picture. His typology (what all Christians hold in common, what all Protestants hold in common, what evangelicals believe, etc) is a great and original vantage point to a conversation that is all too typically polemic in presentation. Begin with what is common and work to differences after you comprehend this massive area of commonality. It makes discussion of differences more possible. Still, the divisions in Baptist life are unavoidable at this time and real. Locating oneself is not an exercise in self-congratulation, but an opportunity for reflection. Worth reading.
Rigiot
I grew up in a Southern Baptist Church that had been indoctrinated by the "new" SBC regime of the 80's and 90's. I graduated from a Baptist University that broke off from it and mourned the loss of the "old" SBC. I was torn and caught in the middle of a controversy I didn't quite understand. Several churches later I began to see the problems myself and learn of the truth to the SBC's historical beliefs.

I read this book about a year ago and its content has been imprinted in my mind. Humphreys' book helped me to fully understand the theological issues involved in the revisions to the Baptist Faith & Message and how Southern Baptists are not better off than they were before! I regret that I was out of college before I understood the controversy, but I am thankful that I can recommend this book to family and friends in the SBC who have absolutely no clue as to the true historical beliefs of the SBC.

I am sad to say that the SBC with its current leadership is only apt to move further away from its roots and even further away from N.T. Christianity. This book should be required reading for all those who profess themselves to be a 'Southern Baptist' today.

I also recommend reading:
Pagan Christianity: Exploring the Roots of Our Church Practices