» » Hinduism and the Baha'i Faith

Download Hinduism and the Baha'i Faith fb2

by Moojan Momen
Download Hinduism and the Baha'i Faith fb2
Other Religions Practices & Sacred Texts
  • Author:
    Moojan Momen
  • ISBN:
    0853982996
  • ISBN13:
    978-0853982999
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    George Ronald Publisher Ltd (January 7, 1990)
  • Pages:
    100 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Other Religions Practices & Sacred Texts
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1840 kb
  • ePUB format
    1406 kb
  • DJVU format
    1441 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    182
  • Formats:
    azw mobi lit doc


Moojan Momen’s short book Hinduism and the Bahá’í Faith is a welcome addition to the growing secondary literature . As Momen shows, the Bahá’í teachings underscore this

Moojan Momen’s short book Hinduism and the Bahá’í Faith is a welcome addition to the growing secondary literature on the Bahá’í Faith and its relation to other world religions. It is especially welcome because until now there has been virtually nothing substantive written about the connection between Hinduism and the Bahá’í Faith, and, as Momen notes at the end of his book, India currently has the largest Bahá’í community in the world. The vast majority of Indian Bahá’ís were formerly Hindus. As Momen shows, the Bahá’í teachings underscore this. Because human minds are limited and finite and evolving, there can never be any complete description of God or of the world.

While "Hinduism and the Bahai Faith" has been written as an introduction to the Bahai Faith to those of the Hindu tradition, it is helpful . Momen, a noted scholar of the Baha'i teachings, makes a brave attempt in this short book.

While "Hinduism and the Bahai Faith" has been written as an introduction to the Bahai Faith to those of the Hindu tradition, it is helpful for those of other religions who wish to gain an insight into both religions and who may, perhaps, seek to identify areas of similarity with their own religion. Hinduism is not merely a religion, it is a collection of religious traditions that have evolved to represent a wide variety of views about most matters while the pivotal points of the Bahai Faith are the belief in a progressive, recurring divine revelation and the unity of all religions.

Hinduism is recognized in the Bahá'í Faith as one of nine known religions and its scriptures are regarded as predicting the coming of Bahá'u'lláh (Kalki avatar). Krishna is included in the succession of Manifestations of God. The authenticity of the Hindu scriptures is seen as uncertain. Scriptural references. Avatars (Manifestations of God). Ethical and moral teachings. Adaptation of Bahá'í teachings to Hindu context.

ISBN13:9780853982999. Release Date:July 1990.

Excellent book that serves to both concisely introduce the Baha'i Faith and point out the similarities and connections between Hinduism and the Baha'i Faith.

Hinduism is one of the most ancient of the existing religious traditions; the Baha'i Faith is the most modern. Excellent book that serves to both concisely introduce the Baha'i Faith and point out the similarities and connections between Hinduism and the Baha'i Faith.

Author: Momen, Moojan. Subject: Hinduism - Relations - Bahai Faith. Subject: Bahai Faith - Relations - Hinduism.

Hinduism is recognized in the Baháʼí Faith as one of nine known religions and its scriptures are regarded as predicting the coming of Baháʼu'lláh (Kalki avatar)

Hinduism is recognized in the Baháʼí Faith as one of nine known religions and its scriptures are regarded as predicting the coming of Baháʼu'lláh (Kalki avatar). Baháʼu'lláh was familiar with Hinduism, which is clear from a tablet to Mírzá Abu'l-Faḍl, the English translation of which is included in the volume Tabernacle of Unity.

Dr Moojan Momen is a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society and a member of both the British Society for Middle Eastern Studies and the Association for Baha’i Studies. One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline.

Hinduism and the Baha'i Faith by Moojan Momen. London: Baha' Publishing Trust (of the British Isles), 1970)An excerpt from the book, consisting just of those items which are not already online in other books

Hinduism and the Baha'i Faith by Moojan Momen. The Promised Day is Come by Shoghi Effendi. A Resource Guide for the Scholarly Study of the Baha'i Faith by Robert H. Stockman and Jonah Winters. Bah ' Administration by Shoghi Effendi. The Baha'i Faith and Marxism (HTML at bahai-library. Memorials of the Faithful by 'Abdu'l-Bah. The Promulgation of Universal Peace by 'Abdu'l-Bah. London: Baha' Publishing Trust (of the British Isles), 1970)An excerpt from the book, consisting just of those items which are not already online in other books. Bah ' Scriptures: Selections from the Utterances of Bah u ll h and Abdu l-Bah. Bah 'u'll h and Abdu'l-Bah.

Dr Momen examines the Bahá'í approach to: * Darshana * Dharma * Moksha and gives an account of: * significant Hindu prophecies * the Bahá'í social teachings, laws and history * the Bahá'í community. Hinduism is one of the most ancient of the existing religious traditions; the Bahá'í Faith is the most modern. Here is an introduction to the Bahá'í Faith for those of the Hindu tradition. Most presentations of the Bahá'í Faith have been from Western, Christian or Islamic viewpoint. This approach excludes much of the world's population. By presenting it from the perspective of the Hindu tradition, Dr Momen provides people from this background with information about the Bahá'í Faith in a way which is meaningful to them while giving Bahá'ís new insights into their religion.

Iseared
All religions have as their foundation stone the Golden Rule which in Christianity is expressed as "Do unto others as you would have others do unto you". In Hinduism the Golden Rule is expressed as: "This is the sum of duty: do naught to others that which if done to thee would cause pain" while the Bahai Faith expresses it as: "Blessed is he who preferreth his brother before himself." If we are to prevent religious rivalry progressing to religious war it is important that we learn about other religions and try to identify and emphasize our common heritage rather than highlight our differences. While "Hinduism and the Bahai Faith" has been written as an introduction to the Bahai Faith to those of the Hindu tradition, it is helpful for those of other religions who wish to gain an insight into both religions and who may, perhaps, seek to identify areas of similarity with their own religion.
Hinduism is not merely a religion, it is a collection of religious traditions that have evolved to represent a wide variety of views about most matters while the pivotal points of the Bahai Faith are the belief in a progressive, recurring divine revelation and the unity of all religions. The Qur'an tells us that God sent messengers to all peoples and that He made known His will and His truth through Noah, Abraham, Moses, Krishna, Buddha, Zoroaster, Christ, and Muhammed. All religions have their origin in God and are different reflections of the same truth. As every age requires a fresh measure of the light of God, every divine revelation has been sent in a manner befitting the circumstances of the age in which it appeared. The Lord Krishna talks about progressive revelation in these words: "Whenever there is a decline in righteousness, O Bharat, and the rise of irreligion, it is then that I send forth My righteousness. I manifest myself from age to age."
Momen explains the philosophy, the law and morals, and the right way of living, in both the Hindu and Bahai Faiths to show that there is no conflict between the two, and provides a table showing the similarities of the two faiths. An Indian once said to 'Abdu'l-Baha, the son of Baha'u'llah the founder of the Bahai Faith: "My aim in life is to transmit as far as in me lies the message of Krishna to the world." 'Abdu'l-Baha replied: "The message of Krishna is the message of love. All God's prophets have brought the message of love." We need to be constantly reminded that love is the only way that we will find a solution to our problems. Whatever the reader's religious background, he or she will profit from learning about the religious truths that unite us.
Urtte
At first glance it would seem hard to find two religious systems with less in common than Hinduism and the Baha'i Faith. Both are established "world religions" but that seems to be about all.
Hinduism is very old, has a huge following, and is concentrated in one part of the world, indeed is intimately associated with it ("Hindu" and "India" have the same root). Its rich tapestry includes elements of popular polytheism. Baha'i is only just over a century and a half old, with a much smaller following spread throughout the world, is very definitively of the "Abrahamic" tradition of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and is sternly monotheistic.
And yet it is a basic Baha'i teaching that the world's religions have a common source, share a basic spiritual truth, and have more in common than what divides them. How, then to reconcile these two faiths?
Momen, a noted scholar of the Baha'i teachings, makes a brave attempt in this short book. It is aimed at the general reader and so lacks the weight that academics are looking for, but within that framework the result is interesting and challenging. And it is always good to read a book about different religions which is not going down the "I am right, you are wrong" route but rather says "Let's look and see whether we might both be right".
LØV€ YØỮ
At the beginning of Hinduism and the Baha'i Faith Dr. Momen announces that Baha'is do not believe that the Baha'i Faith has come to supplant Hinduism. Rather one of its aims is to take the tradition on to a further stage of its development. (xi) To the extent that his book has opened up an arena for both current and future dialogue between the Hindu and Baha'i traditions, it must be measured a success. Moreover, its attempts to find a common ground of religious truths shared by the traditions can only help in this enterprise.Where differences are noted and critiqued, it can only be hoped that such analyses will produce among its readers (of whatever religious or secular affiliation) what Huston Smith has termed the wisdom of listening. Without listening, the world is left with a myriad of loud assertions, and even louder counter assertions, to which the fundamentalisms of our time -- including certain strains of militant Hindutva and of theocratic Bahaism -- readily attest. In Smith's own words: "Those who listen work for peace, a peace built not on ecclesiastical hegemonies but on understanding and mutual concern"