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by Walter James Hoffman
Download The Mide'wiwin: Grand Medicine Society of the Ojibway fb2
Other Religions Practices & Sacred Texts
  • Author:
    Walter James Hoffman
  • ISBN:
    1410222969
  • ISBN13:
    978-1410222961
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University Press of the Pacific (May 23, 2005)
  • Pages:
    204 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Other Religions Practices & Sacred Texts
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1658 kb
  • ePUB format
    1897 kb
  • DJVU format
    1731 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    614
  • Formats:
    doc lrf lrf lit


The Midewiwin is the society of the Mide or Shamans, popularly designated as the Grand Medicine Society.

The Midewiwin is the society of the Mide or Shamans, popularly designated as the Grand Medicine Society. It is found in many Algonkin tribes. Its ritual, and the traditions of Indian genesis and cosmogony, constitute a powerful religion. Originally published in 1891 in the Bulletin of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Seventh Annual Report, 1885-1886.

Hoffman Walter James The Ojibwa is one of the largest tribes of the United States, and it isscattered over a considerable area, from the Province of Ontario, on theeast, to the Red River of the Nort. h, on the west, and from Manitobasouthward through the States of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan. Thistribe is, strictly speaking, a timber people, and in its westwardmigration or dispersion has never passed beyond the limit of the timbergrowth which so remarkably divides the State of Minnesota into two partspossessing distinct physical features.

Walter James Hoffman. Встречается в книгах (10) с 1869 по 1894

Walter James Hoffman. Не удалось найти ни одного отзыва. Встречается в книгах (10) с 1869 по 1894. Стр. 154 - Wab6nO' is primarily prompted by dreams or visions which may occur during his youth, for which purpose he leaves his village to fast for an indefinite number of days.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Midnight Caller.

Ojibway The Midewiwin is the society of the Mide or Shamans, popularly designated as the Grand Medicine Society. University Press of the Pacific. Walter James Hoffman.

The Mide'wiwin: Grand Medicine Society of the Ojibway The Midewiwin is the society of the Mide or Shamans, popularly designated as the Grand Medicine Society.

Title: The Mide'wiwin or "Grand Medicine Society" of the Ojibwa. Government Printing Office, Washington, 1891, pages 143-300. Author: Walter James Hoffman. Seventh Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology to the. Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1885-1886, Government Printing Office, Washington, 1891, pages 143-300. Release Date: September 25, 2006. Character set encoding: UTF-8 . Start of this project gutenberg ebook grand medicine society .

The Mishomis Book: The voice of the Ojibway. Minnesota Historical Press (St. Paul: 1979). Hoffman, Walter James, . Indian Country Communications, In. and Red School House Press (Hayward, WI: 1988). The Mide'wiwin: Grand Medicine Society of the Ojibway. Lightning Source Inc. (Minneapolis: 2005).

Grand Medicine Society of the Ojibway. by Walter J. Hoffman. Published May 31, 2005 by University Press of the Pacific.

by Walter James Hoffman. The MID/wiwin or "Grand medicine society" of the ojibwa (c. 1900). The North American Indian (1907), volume 1 of a series of volumes picturing and describing the Indians of the US and Alaska.

The Midewiwin is the society of the Mide or Shamans, popularly designated as the Grand Medicine Society. It is found in many Algonkin tribes. Its ritual, and the traditions of Indian genesis and cosmogony, constitute a powerful religion. Originally published in 1891 in the Bulletin of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Seventh Annual Report, 1885-1886.

kolos
Another great book to add to your history collection in terms of cultural areas. Its a general book for Ojibway spirituality.
Drelajurus
Just wanted to let people know I happened across this book at the Gutenberg Project for free. It is apparently available in different formats if you care to download. We aren't allowed to leave a link. I Googled Midewiwin and clicked on the link with Project Gutenberg on it. I read parts of the book online in my browser and have downloaded in Kindle format for a more through reading later. As with many books written by outsiders you should keep in mind it comes through the veil of their culture and understanding so I have no doubts parts a Mide'wiwin reading this book would find fault with it, but the book could serve as an introduction and perhaps offers some historical insight on the views of outsiders.

The book refers to the Mide'wiwin as "shaman": "The Midē', in the true sense of the word, is a Shaman, though he has by various authors been termed powwow, medicine man, priest, seer, prophet, etc. Among the Ojibwa the office is not hereditary; but among the Menomoni a curious custom exists, by which some one is selected to fill the vacancy one year after the death of a Shaman." While I make no claim to being Native American I have heard more than one of the northern nations object to the term shaman being used in connection with their spiritual beliefs. I understand Western outsiders selected the term shaman from Siberia as a generalized term for the spiritual beliefs of indigenous peoples because it did not carry with it baggage or implications of terms like witch doctor, but some indigenous peoples feel the use of this term lumping all indigenous beliefs together as incorrect or perhaps disrespectful. I read one Native American who explained they don't like to be called shaman because this can encompass or imply belief in multiple deities or gods and they only believe in one great spirit or god. I'm not an expert on Native American beliefs, but the fact shaman is being used already makes me feel the book is probably not totally authentic or representative of Native American sensibilities.
Goldendragon
Being a traditional native person , ceremony person, from that perspective , this book is a little shallow, it is from the point of view of the "black robes" and non native people of the time where the understanding of these things is more or less lost , some of the descriptions, literal, make it interesting at least ,

from a historical view point this is a early written view and perception of the medewiwin people , medicine people , and it is interesting in the way that it illustrates the narrow mind set of the time.As a collectors item in this sense it is not bad.