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by Mary S. Rustad
Download The Black Books of Elverum fb2
Occult & Paranormal
  • Author:
    Mary S. Rustad
  • ISBN:
    1880090759
  • ISBN13:
    978-1880090756
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Galde Press, Inc.; 1 Ed edition (June 1, 2009)
  • Pages:
    176 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Occult & Paranormal
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1111 kb
  • ePUB format
    1129 kb
  • DJVU format
    1999 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    318
  • Formats:
    lrf docx mbr mobi


Mary S. Rustad was born in Minnesota of Norwegian heritage. The 'Black Book' this is based on has a hand written date of 1682 however the author and other experts believe it's actually dated from around 1790 to 1820 when it was penned.

Mary S. After living on the farm for 21 years, she has become familiar with some of her ancestors. These books were copied from one another much like Witchers were said to do in Medieval times.

Start by marking The Black Books of Elverum as Want to Read . The book also helps understand the mindset behind folktales and folk medicine, as well as the sometimes absurd spells and curses used by peasants and their clerical leaders.

Start by marking The Black Books of Elverum as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Also included are bits on the religious persecution of this era (. burning witches and shunning).

The Black Books of Elverum is a two-volume diabolical grimoire that was discovered in an attic in Norway. It was likely written between 1790 and 1820 by an individual practitioner, and mixes Christian and pagan concepts and superstitions

The Black Books of Elverum is a two-volume diabolical grimoire that was discovered in an attic in Norway. It was likely written between 1790 and 1820 by an individual practitioner, and mixes Christian and pagan concepts and superstitions. The lists of spells and demons provided here are currently incomplete. This grimoire is in the tradition of Cyprian.

Book's incantations employ the well known pattern from other Black Books of portraying one of these Christian figures suffering from, then ultimately prevailing over the same affliction the incantation aims to cure. Folklorists call the kind of wizardry that underlies such formulas "sympathetic magic.

Are you sure you want to remove The Black Books of Elverum from your list? . Published June 1, 1999 by Galde Press, In. .There's no description for this book yet.

Are you sure you want to remove The Black Books of Elverum from your list? The Black Books of Elverum.

The Black Books of Elverum – Mary Rustad Galde Press – 1999 In the 1970s, Mary Rustad, a lady in Norway, was looking through the farmhouse that she had recently moved into. This house . he Black Books of Elverum – Mary Rustad Galde Press – 1999 In the 1970s, Mary Rustad, a lady in Norway, was looking through the farmhouse that she had recently moved into. uke De Richleau. Satanskin – James Havoc Creation Press – 1992 When I was reading Irene’s Cunt a few weeks ago, I spotted an ad in the back of that book for another book named Satanskin.

Dark Star Magick ~ New, Used, Rare Antiquarian Occult Books, Grimoires. A silent and sombre dedication expressed in this polished black-enamel, Victorian mourning ring. Made of fine English pewter with polished enamel.

This is my collection of books, videos and other files from theoccult. 1. The Black Books of Elverum - Mary Rustad 2. The Book of Gold - David Rankine 3. The Grimoire of Arthur Gauntlet - David Rankine. SO, here's the books with some exclusives that they would ban me from sharing here, but hell, guess I might as well do something to deserve it. Get this torrent Anonymous Download. I'd greatly appreciate it if you could upload pdf formats of it. Thanks in advance!!

Manufacturer: Galde Press, Inc. Release date: 1 June 1999 ISBN-10 : 1880090759 ISBN-13: 9781880090756.

Black Raven – Johannes Faust. The Black Books of Elverum – Mary S Rustad. Sephe Raziel – Stephen Skinner & Don Karr. The Sword of Moses – Gaster Moses. The Book of Secrets – Albertus Magnus. The Dictionary of Angels – Davidson Gustav. Angels A to Z – Evelyn Oliver & James R Lewis. Angel Magic – . ames. Sacred Magic of the Angels – David Goddard.

In a dusty attic in central Norway, Mary Rustad came upon two ancient handwritten books of magic used by the common people--practical handbooks for daily concerns like stopping a toothache, retrieving stolen goods, and protecting livestock. Contains reproductions of the original, Old Norwegian pages facing the English translation. Includes an account of a 17th-century Norwegian witch trial.

Briciraz
This is a fascinating and historical book. The story of the Author and her family and ancestors as described in the introduction is interesting and compelling. She lives a life I often dream about living myself. This is a very good book and relevant as historical documents into the past and the beliefs and perspectives of our ancestors. I am a practitioner and believer in Ásatrú and my only negative comment regards my own ignorance or failure to research the content of the book more closely prior to purchase as all of the stories I have read so far refer to Jesus and Mary and the Post Pagan (Overt) era in Norway or Scandinavia. Regardless, it is a fascinating read and one can't help but wonder if the stories related in the book featuring the Christian "deities" had previously featured the Aesir, Vanir and Jotun. A welcome addition to my library.
Foginn
Are you sick and tired of the lame *ssed spellbooks that are out on the market today? Have a desire to get back to the roots of Magic from elder days gone by? Here's a treasury of great material for you to peruse!

In this offeirng. Mary S. Rustad has given you a tremendous look into the past by showing you actual authentic 'spells' from the past! Ever had that dream of finding some old Witch's pesonal journal? Look no further! Page by page you're shown the original manuscript on the left page and on the right page you've given the translation. This way you can compare the translation (if you can read old Norwegian!)

The 'Black Book' this is based on has a hand written date of 1682 however the author and other experts believe it's actually dated from around 1790 to 1820 when it was penned. These books were copied from one another much like Witchers were said to do in Medieval times. This particular black book has a renunciation of God the father which you (allegedly) sign in blood.

Then inside are spells for everyting: abortions, boils, cards/dice games, fevers, fishing, hauntings, judicial proceedings, money, relatives, sexual relations, and many more. There's old folk-lore and Ms. Rustad even discusses a relative of her's who was convicted and burned alive in Rustad for Witchcraft.

This is a fascinating account from a bygone era. If you just happen to be a purveyor of old and unusual folklore then this book is for you. Or perhaps you revel in ancient folk medicines and remedies? If so, you too will like this book. Rare are such books and it is wise to take advantage of them when & where you can before such knowledge is suppressed yet again by the Religious Reich.

I give this book five out of five possible stars.
Granigrinn
Aside from the black magic aspects of the work (which may be of interest to others) this book is important for a couple of reasons:

1) Many ideas found in them correlate to other Norse mythic and magical works from the Eddas to the Icelandic Galdrabok, but not Mediterranean magic. This is even more true once one filters out the Christian elements.

2) Some elements of the work correlate to broader Indo-European ideas. Compare the remedy for infertility with the dragon-slaying formulae discussed by Calvert Watkins in "How to Kill a Dragon."

For anyone studying folklore, Scandenavian mythology and ideas, Indo-European studies, or magic relating to these traditions, this is an important work.
Hanad
This is a rare find. Quite an insight into some of the lesser known folk ways of Norway in past centuries. The author does an excellent job of setting the historical and cultural contexts before getting into the heart of the matter - photocopies of every page of two original, hand-written books, along with English translations. These very old books contain everything from simple remedies, recipes, and potions up through some darker spells and incantations. Fascinating stuff!
nailer
A great read of the customs and superstitions of the old country folk and of their healthcare customs.
Dishadel
A fascinating glimpse into Norway's past. These precious books are a reflection of what people did when medical help was not readily available. The book comes from a time of fear and superstition. It is a fascinationg window into the thinking of old Norway. What would you do if your a family member was ill and you had only yourselves to depend on?
Cells
If you're familiar with the German traditions of folk magic, the Pennsylvania Dutch Pow-wows / Long Lost Friend traditions, or even other American folk magical practices such as Hoodoo, the contents of the two collections of manuscript spells from the 19th century presented in this book aren't going to be all that unfamiliar. The material needs, first, to be taken at face value. There's no ideology here, much less theology; the original collectors freely acknowledged that the spells were a mashup of dimly remembered pagan traditions, garbled bits of liturgical Latin from the Roman Catholic era, and conventional Christian prayers.

The spells will be especially interesting if you can follow the nineteenth century Norwegian presented in facsimile, in crabbed, Sutterlin style cursive blackletter hands. The handwriting is as much an obstacle as the language, which is definitely 19th century Dano-Norwegian and not "Old Norwegian" as suggested. As a magical handbook for current practice, it would need some updating: what you have here, as in the corresponding Cyprianus traditions, is a collection of rustic spells, largely concerned with curing minor ills, manipulating love or fertility, and other such homely concerns. Put three baby mice in a bottle of liquor and give it to a drunkard to drink to make him stop drinking. (Just might work.) Beat a snake to death with a stick and lift a woman's skirt with the same stick three times to get her to conceive. (Maybe not.)

This is an interesting bit of folklore in its own right. The aspiring wise woman or cunning man would learn from this mostly how the old spells were put together; they may need to be updated to address more contemporary concerns in actual practice.