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by Arthur Edward Waite
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New Age & Spirituality
  • Author:
    Arthur Edward Waite
  • ISBN:
    0922802882
  • ISBN13:
    978-0922802883
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Kessinger Publishing, LLC (January 1, 1992)
  • Pages:
    340 pages
  • Subcategory:
    New Age & Spirituality
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1785 kb
  • ePUB format
    1234 kb
  • DJVU format
    1558 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    998
  • Formats:
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Arthur Edward Waite, Edward Kelly. The Quest of the Golden Stairs: A mystery of kinghood in Faerie. Devil-Worship in France With Diana Vaughan and the Question of Modern Palladism.

Arthur Edward Waite, Edward Kelly. Azoth or the Star in the East. The Book Of Lambspring: A Noble Ancient Philosopher Concerning The Philosophical Stone. Arthur Edward Waite, Nicholas Bernaud Delphinas. The Golden Age Restored: An Ancient Alchemical Tract. Henry Madathanus, Arthur Edward Waite.

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Waite, Arthur Edward, 1857-1942, trans Waite, Arthur Edward, 1857-1942: Studies in Mysticism and Certain .

Waite, Arthur Edward, 1857-1942, trans. The Book of Lambspring, A Noble Ancient Philosopher, Concerning the Philosophical Stone: Rendered into Latin Verse by Nicholas Barnaud Delphinas, Doctor of Medicine, a Zealous Student of this Art, by Lambsprinck, also trans. Waite, Arthur Edward, 1857-1942: Studies in Mysticism and Certain Aspects of the Secret Tradition (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1906). multiple formats at Google. page images at HathiTrust. Waite, Arthur Edward, 1857-1942: Lamps of western mysticism; essays on the life of the soul in God. (New York, Knopf, 1923) (page images at HathiTrust).

Professor Arthur Edward Waite. This book is a facsimile reprint and may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Contents: Essays on the Life of the Soul in God. A collection of thirty-two Essays in Three Parts. Lamps of Quest: The Path of Reality: An Ex-parte Statement; Oblation and Service; Consecrations of Life and Thought; The Higher Understanding; The Sense of the Infinite; Life and Doctrine; A Study in Contrast; The Higher Aspect; Spiritism and the Mystic Quest; Official Churches and Spiritism; The Path of the Mysteries.

This early work by Arthur Edward Waite was originally published in 1923 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. Lamps of Western Mysticism' contains a wealth of information on the history and practices of Western mysticism, including the Dionysian heritage, post-reformation mystics, and mystical realisation. Arthur Edward Waite was born on the 2nd of October, 1857 in America. Waite was a scholarly mystic who wrote extensively on occult and esoteric matters, and was the co-creator of the Rider-Waite Tarot deck.

Gifts & Registry. Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 0 x . 0 Inches.

ISBN 10: 1162560487 ISBN 13: 9781162560489. Publisher: Kessinger Publishing, LLC, 2010. This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages.

Arthur Edward Waite (October 2, 1857 - May 19, 1942) was an English poet, and a scholarly mystic who wrote extensively on occult and esoteric matters. He was the co-creator of the Rider-Waite Tarot deck. As his biographer, . Gilbert described him, "Waite's name has survived because he was the first to attempt a systematic study of the history of western occultism – viewed as a spiritual tradition rather than as aspects of proto-science or as the pathology of religion.

author: Arthur Edward Waite d. ate. te: 2005-07-13 d. citation: 1893 d. dentifier. origpath: 5 d. copyno: 1 d.

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

Reddefender
Once you penetrate Waite's somewhat dense Victorian writing style you find genuinely perceptive observations on the nature of the mystic experience in the West. I was almost put off by his early insistence that all mystics of note in the western world accepted the dogmas and sacraments of the Church. He goes out of his way to suggest that there was no esoteric underground to which they owed their enlightenment. Then he goes on to elaborate on this. He holds that all these mystics reached the same goal (Divine Union) individually. That is the nature of mystic union in the West for there has never been a recognized school or order that truly represented such an approach. For the westerner it has always been a matter of individuals, and not of a tradition of schools or gurus. Yet, all these great mystics, to varying degrees, reached the same goal. It would seem that the essential factor isn't tradition and teaching, but Divine Grace. He does point out that while these mystics accepted scripture and sacraments they invariably held their own personal, higher, mystical interpretation of them- though some simply kept silent on the subject. In fact, when many of these mystics were declared heretic it was usually for matters that had little to do with their true feelings on traditional doctrines.

This book also tells us much about Arthur Edward Waite himself. While he was recognized as a magus and adept of unmatched learning and attainment, this testament shows where his heart really was- in Union with God through Christ. Admittedly, his understanding of the term "Christ" is on a plane above that of the average church member. Indeed, he repeatedly condemns conventional churches with having become too worldly and having lost the true meaning of their teachings. As he points out- only the mystic (and he admits to his own mystic experiences) truly understands these things today, but there are far more people with mystic potential than many would guess at. It is obvious that Waite's own approach to magic was that of theurgy- magic with the sole intent of reaching and serving the One in All, of being the channel of Divine will in the world.

As for his insistence that true mysticism in the West had to be practiced through the Church, in this he truly seems to me to presage the Perennialist school of Guenon.

There are a number of very interesting plates of portraits and statues of many of the mystics discussed in the text in this edition (Rudolf Steiner Publications.)
Nikohn
Once you penetrate Waite's somewhat dense Victorian writing style you find genuinely perceptive observations on the nature of the mystic experience in the West. I was almost put off by his early insistence that all mystics of note in the western world accepted the dogmas and sacraments of the Church. He goes out of his way to suggest that there was no esoteric underground to which they owed their enlightenment. Then he goes on to elaborate on this. He holds that all these mystics reached the same goal (Divine Union) individually. That is the nature of mystic union in the West for there has never been a recognized school or order that truly represented such an approach. For the westerner it has always been a matter of individuals, and not of a tradition of schools or gurus. Yet, all these great mystics, to varying degrees, reached the same goal. It would seem that the essential factor isn't tradition and teaching, but Divine Grace. He does point out that while these mystics accepted scripture and sacraments they invariably held their own personal, higher, mystical interpretation of them- though some simply kept silent on the subject. In fact, when many of these mystics were declared heretic it was usually for matters that had little to do with their true feelings on traditional doctrines.

This book also tells us much about Arthur Edward Waite himself. While he was recognized as a magus and adept of unmatched learning and attainment, this testament shows where his heart really was- in Union with God through Christ. Admittedly, his understanding of the term "Christ" is on a plane above that of the average church member. Indeed, he repeatedly condemns conventional churches with having become too worldly and having lost the true meaning of their teachings. As he points out- only the mystic (and he admits to his own mystic experiences) truly understands these things today, but there are far more people with mystic potential than many would guess at. It is obvious that Waite's own approach to magic was that of theurgy- magic with the sole intent of reaching and serving the One in All, of being the channel of Divine will in the world.

As for his insistence that true mysticism in the West had to be practiced through the Church, in this he truly seems to me to presage the Perennialist school of Guenon.

There are a number of very interesting plates of portraits and statues of many of the mystics discussed in the text in this edition.
Amhirishes
To me, this is one of my favorite Waite books. It is uplifting and soul rejuvenating. I especially enjoyed the chapters on Spiritism, not having before known much about it, and found it to be a lovely path in which I found myself in much agreement. This is a book of messages. Messages of hope, of love, of faith, of redemption, of life everlasting. I absolutely loved it!