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by William E. Leuchtenburg
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Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Author:
    William E. Leuchtenburg
  • ISBN:
    019513026X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0195130263
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press; First Edition edition (November 9, 2000)
  • Pages:
    416 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1547 kb
  • ePUB format
    1188 kb
  • DJVU format
    1208 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    919
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In American Places, more than two dozen of America's most gifted historians write about their encounters with . William E. Leuchtenburg is William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of History at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

In American Places, more than two dozen of America's most gifted historians write about their encounters with historic places, bringing a personal viewpoint to bear on a wide variety of sites, ranging from Monticello to Fenway Park. Here James M. McPherson writes about the battlefield of Gettysburg, and how walking the ground of Pickett's Charge inspired one of his books. Professor of History at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He has served as president of both the Organization of American Historians and the American Historical Association.

American Places book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking American Places: Encounters with History as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

William Edward Leuchtenburg (born 1922) is the William Rand Kenan Jr. professor . August 29, 1969 – via Google Books. "William E. Leuchtenburg Papers". professor emeritus of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is a leading scholar of the life and career of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. That Man: An Insider's Portrait of Franklin D. Roosevelt with Robert H. Jackson et al. (2004). The White House Looks South: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Lyndon B. Johnson (2005). University of North Carolina Archives.

Home Browse Books Book details, American Places: Encounters with History: . .By William E. Leuchtenburg.American Places: Encounters with History: A Celebration of Sheldon Meyer. In American Places, more than two dozen of America's most gifted historians write about their encounters with historic places, bringing a personal viewpoint to bear on a wide variety of sites, ranging from Monticello to Fenway Park.

Home Leuchtenburg, William E. American Places : Encounters with History. thi book is about America's Leading Historians Talk about the Sites Where the Past Comes Alive for Them. ISBN 10: 019513026X, ISBN 13: 9780195130263. Bookseller Inventory ABE-224046566. Ask Seller a Question. Bibliographic Details. Title: American Places : Encounters with History. Publisher: New York, NY, . Oxford University Press, Incorporated, 2000. Publication Date: 2000.

American Places : Encounters with History.

The events of the past, writes noted historian William E. Leuchtenburg, come alive when we encounter them on the ground.

Encounters with History. Introduction, William Leuchtenburg Cyberspace, . Edward L. Ayers Pennsylvania Avenue: The Avenue of The Presidents, Paul Boller, Jr. A Monument for Barre: Memory in a Massachusetts Town, T. H. Breen Greensboro, North Carolina: A Window on Race in the American South, William H. Chafe World War II Normandy: American Cemetery and Memorial, James C. Cobb The Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial, Washington, .

Meyer, Sheldon; Leuchtenburg, William Edward, 1922 . Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Meyer, Sheldon; Leuchtenburg, William Edward, 1922-. Meyer, Sheldon, Historic sites, Historians. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on April 11, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

William E. William Edward Leuchtenburg. September 28, 1922 (1922-09-28) (age 97). New York City. William Edward Leuchtenburg (born September 28, 1922 in Ridgewood, New York) is William Rand Kenan Jr. YouTube Encyclopedic.

For anyone interested in history, the physical traces of the past, especially historical places, hold a special fascination. Whether it is a battlefield or the home of a notable American, there is no question that we understand the past in a different and more immediate way when we encounter it "on the ground." In American Places, more than two dozen of America's most gifted historians write about their own encounters with historic places, bringing a personal viewpoint to bear on a wide variety of sites, ranging from Monticello to Fenway Park. Here James M. McPherson writes about the battlefield of Gettysburg, and how walking the ground of Pickett's Charge inspired one of his books. Kevin Starr visits the Musso & Frank Grill in Hollywood and finds many of the flavors of California history there. Joel Williamson takes a bemused tour of Elvis Presley's Graceland, and David Kennedy tells the story of the "Pig War" of San Juan Island, where a spat between Britain and America over a speck of land in the Pacific helped determine the shape of the U.S. and Canada. William Freehling compares two places, Charleston's Battery and New Orleans' Jackson Square, showing how each reveals the different spirit of the society that created it. And Edward Ayers talks about spending time in Cyberspace, U.S.A., a virtual place that has much in common with the America visited by Alexis de Tocqueville a century and a half ago. Other pieces include Robert Dallek on the FDR Memorial, David Hackett Fischer on the Boston Common, and William Leuchtenburg on his native borough of Queens. American Places celebrates the career of Sheldon Meyer, who over his years at Oxford University Press has published some of our most distinguished historians, including many Pulitzer Prize and Bancroft Prize winners, virtually all of whom have contributed to this volume.

Fog
I have to echo Rick Friedman's praise of Leuchtenburg's book. This is a wonderful survey of places where the past has come alive for some of the top names in the field of American history. From the Grand Canyon to cyberspace to Graceland, these short essays convey a sense of the "spirit" of a place--like Montgomery, Alabama, and Fenway Park in Boston--and how it has affected the author and connected him/her to the past. For some, like David Hackett Fischer, it is a sense of history still alive, while for others, David Kennedy, for example, it is how the events that took "place" at a particular location had far-reaching effects. Each essay in American Places is well-written and if I have one complaint it's that there aren't more of them.
Anyone interested in American history and how history effects place and vice versa should pick up this volume. Like Mr. Friedman, I received my copy as a gift and am glad I did.
Nalme
Think of your favorite history professor in college. Imagine having the luxury to ask, "What single place across the country resonates the most with you in terms of history?" And, then, not only go there with that person as your personal guide but be permitted to repeat the process 27 more times with some of the finest teachers in America!
That's what this book does in just over 350 pages.
From small towns you have never heard of to Gettysburg, Monticello, and the New York Giants' Polo Grounds. Brief narratives, written by notable historians, describe not only where but why such places are special to them.
I had given a friend who likes to travel a copy of Charles Kuralt's book, written shortly after he retired from CBS, about the 12 best places Kurault wished to spend one month each in for an entire year. And which month of the year was best to be there. Everyone has their own Top Twelve list, of course. But it was nice to see the country from Kurault's perspective.
In return for the Kurault book, my friend surprised me with a literary gift of his own the next time he was in my neck of the woods. It was this book--American Places, Encounters with History. What a delight! The writers have a special knack for making their favorite places come alive.
Each essay is no more than 10-12 pages. The perfect ticket to some of the best ideas for future trips you'll want to take as soon as you finish the book.
Vizuru
Almost all the writers, not all, mentioned Black people and slavery in their stories, and some Jews and Indians. Some of them used the word White as if it were a dirty word. These writers seem to be all liberals who want to prove that they aren't racists. And how many Blacks are going to read this book? Unless it's required reading in school. To me, these stories were a subtle bashing of people whom they think are racist in their thinking and actions. I would not have bought the book if I had known all this racial...was in it.