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by John P. Ferré,P. Mark Fackler,Clifford G. Christians
Download Good News: Social Ethics and the Press (Communication and Society) fb2
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Author:
    John P. Ferré,P. Mark Fackler,Clifford G. Christians
  • ISBN:
    0195084322
  • ISBN13:
    978-0195084320
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press (June 3, 1993)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1410 kb
  • ePUB format
    1765 kb
  • DJVU format
    1455 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    848
  • Formats:
    rtf txt mbr mobi


Good News is good news for anyone interested in an intellectually rich treatment of questions of media ethics and responsibility. -Theodore L. Glasser, Stanford University. Whether the reader agrees or disagrees with its conclusions, Good News is a thoughtful proposal that deserves debate. By far, the best work on media ethics I've encountered.

Good News: Social Ethics and the Press (Communication and Society). Clifford G. Christians, John P. Ferré, P. Mark Fackler. Download (pdf, 1. 0 Mb) Donate Read.

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Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Good News: Social Ethics and the Press (Communication and Society). Category: Техника, Связь. 1. 0 Mb. The Handbook of Global Communication and Media Ethics (Handbooks in Communication and Media) (volume 1+2). Robert S. Fortner, P.

by John P. Ferré, Mark P. Fackler, Clifford G. Christians.

Keizersgracht 424, 1016 GC Amsterdam, KVK: 56829787, BTW: NL852321363B01.

Title (alternate script). Good news : social ethics and the press. News: The Empowerment Story. News as Social Narrative - 5. Organizational Culture. Ferre, John P; Fackler, Mark. Author (alternate script). Corporate Moral Agency.

Mass media ethics and the classical liberal ideal of the autonomous individual are historically linked and professionally dominant--yet the authors of this work feel this is intrinsically flawed. They show how recent research in philosophy and social science--together with a longer tradition in theological inquiry--insist that community, mutuality, and relationship are fundamental to a full concept of personhood. The authors argue that "persons-in-community" provides a more defensible grounding for journalists' professional moral decision-making in crucial areas such as truthtelling, privacy, organizational culture, and balanced coverage. With numerous examples drawn from life as well as from theory, this book will interest journalists, editors, and professionals in media management as well as students and scholars of media ethics, reporting, and media law.