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by Nicholas Woodsworth
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Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Author:
    Nicholas Woodsworth
  • ISBN:
    1905791321
  • ISBN13:
    978-1905791323
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Haus Publishing; First Edition edition (March 1, 2008)
  • Pages:
    282 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1683 kb
  • ePUB format
    1907 kb
  • DJVU format
    1462 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    121
  • Formats:
    mbr txt lit docx


Nicholas Woodsworth was born in Ottawa, Canada, in 1953 and grew up in Africa and south-east Asia.

Nicholas Woodsworth was born in Ottawa, Canada, in 1953 and grew up in Africa and south-east Asia. He was Africa Correspondent for the Financial Times in the late 1980s, and served as the Weekend FT's staff travel writer between 1990 and 2003. He is the author of several books, including the Liquid Continent trilogy - Venice, Alexandria and Istanbul - Seeking Provence, and Crossing Jerusalem. Series: Armchair Traveller (Book 1).

The Liquid Continent: Volume I: Alexandria (Armchair Traveler). 1905791321 (ISBN13: 9781905791323). Woodsworth invokes Durrell both stylistically and directly, but doesn't lose himself in the process as he takes the reader through his experience of contemporary Alexandria and why it matters to him and those to whom he speaks.

It's a refreshing thought. The Med is not an empty space.

The result is something to be cherished, says Rory MacLean. It's a refreshing thought. Paris is nothing like Cairo. Rome has little in common with Rabat. Yet in their characters coastal "Marseilles is very much like Alexandria.

Nicholas Woodsworth was born in Ottawa, Canada in 1953 and grew up in a diplomatic family in Africa and Asia. He graduated in Asian history.

by Nicholas Woodsworth Hardback. Nicholas Woodsworth was born in Ottawa, Canada in 1953 and grew up in a diplomatic family in Africa and Asia. He began newspaper freelancing after settling in Aix-en-Provence in his mid-20s.

Book Description The Armchair Traveller at the Bookhaus, United Kingdom, 2008.

ISBN 13: 9781905791323. Nicholas Woodsworth, who lives in Aix-en-Provence, was the staff travel writer at the Financial Times from 1989 to 2003. Book Description The Armchair Traveller at the Bookhaus, United Kingdom, 2008.

The Liquid Continent : Alexandria, Venice and Istanbul. About Nicholas Woodsworth.

In this trilogy, Nicholas Woodsworth makes a journey around the sea’s edge, with this volume focusing on the city of Alexandria.

In this trilogy, Nicholas Woodsworth makes a journey around the sea’s edge, with this volume focusing on the city of Alexandria

series Armchair Traveller. Books related to The Liquid Continent.

series Armchair Traveller.

In the days when English counties were untouched by the dead hand of central government rationalisation, odd little chunks of them used to fetch up in neighbouring shires, appearing as little green or brown blobs, defiantly labelled 'part of Leicestershire' or 'part of Somerset'.

But it wasn’t that simple.

Modern view of an ancient city

Vosho
I love that this, originally a trilogy, is now available in a single volume. This is a beautifully written travel narrative, history lesson and reflection on Mediterranean life. I read this right before travelling to Venice and Istanbul myself, and this book made me even more excited to explore these cities.
Agamaginn
***THIS review relates to vol 3 - Istanbul.****

I have only read the Istanbul volume, but if the other two are the same standard, then this is a must-read.

It took me to parts of Istanbul I know quite well from living there. One of those very well-written, engaging reads about a place you know and are fasclnated by.

In getting to Istanbul from Venice (Vol 2), he travels to Albania - this is not long after the end of Communism. It is one weird place, and right off the tourist beat. I found it fascinating.

As in the best of all travel writing, his search for the way that people of different beliefs, ethnicities, histories can live together and get along is a real strength. His warning against nationalism is being ignored around the world. As one of the people he meets talks about "a global existence guided by two things it now lacks - ethics and judgement."

However, there is hope. He says at the end:

"Does any generation listen to any earlier generation, whatever the issue? Perhaps we are so certain that the world we're rushing into is so new and so different that the past cannot possibly hold anything for us. I don't believe it. More than ever I had the certainty it was the same old world. But I was under no illusion that ancient Ottoman voices would ever have the ears of today's movers and shakers - even if the entire A-list at Davos were to come and sit themselves down on the Galata Bridge and listen hard. I doubt they'd hear anything at all.

"I reached the end of the bridge and began climbing the steep hill to Saint-Benoit. In some ways it didn't matter if Davos listened or not. A cosmopolitan attitude to the world cannot simply be dictated. But then neither can its opposite. ...the Mediterraneans I'd met in the last six months had too much vitality to let their world become the place we fear it might. For them it was still rich in variety and human possibility. Didn't the culture of the old Mediterranean we so much admire today grow out of times as unpredictable as our own? "

Given that things have got immeasurably worse since he wrote this volume, I find that a useful thought to hang hope on.
INwhite
After reading Jan Morris, Mark Hudson, Peter Ackroyd, Italo Calvino and Francesco da Mosto on Venice (after a recent trip there), this is my favorite, succinct account of the watery city. Woodsworth manages to get to the heart of the story of what Venice is in short order and with compelling, lively details. I, too, visited the wonderful naval museum and found the bucintoro there beyond words and after the bacilica the most wondrous treasure in Venice.

I can't wait now to go to Istanbul and Alexandria to experience other untraversed (to me) territories. I like the inherent logic of understanding the Mediterranean waters and how the settlements on its shores interrelated, a topic not often made the central idea of a book unless by dry academics. I look forward to traveling its waters by boat some day soon! Woodsworth is a willing aider and abeter for anyone wanting to experience this voyage for real or from their armchair.