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by Ken McAlpine
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Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Author:
    Ken McAlpine
  • ISBN:
    1400049733
  • ISBN13:
    978-1400049738
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Broadway Books; First Edition edition (June 22, 2004)
  • Pages:
    290 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1222 kb
  • ePUB format
    1558 kb
  • DJVU format
    1521 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    242
  • Formats:
    txt lrf lrf mbr


Start reading Off-Season: Discovering America on Winter's Shore on your Kindle in under a minute. Ken McAlpine, however, is a different kind of tourist

Start reading Off-Season: Discovering America on Winter's Shore on your Kindle in under a minute. Ken McAlpine, however, is a different kind of tourist. Unhappy with the stress and bustle of American life in general, he set out -- alone -- in his van to find places where what he considers the true spirit of "real" America survives. His hunting ground was the East Coast, from the Florida Keys to Lubec, Maine.

Start by marking Off-Season: Discovering America on Winter's Shore as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Издательство: Three Rivers press, Crown Publishing Group. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

McAlpine, Ken, 1959-. - Description and travel. Atlantic States - Description and travel. New York : Three Rivers Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by abowser on February 2, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Off-Season : Discovering America on Winter's Shore. No Longer the Forgotten Season Just after Labor Day, Ken McAlpine said good-bye to his family and began a drive up the East Coast, from Florida to Maine, on a one-man quest to capture the elusive "forgotten season" of beach towns shuttered until the return of warm weather.

Off-Season is a moving portrait that brings to life the magic of the sea and shore in winter, the charm of beach towns emptied of summer crowds, and the warmth and eccentricities of year-round coastal residents who revel in small-town spirit. McAlpine skipped the more popular destinations like Nags Head, Virginia Beach, Cape May, and the Hamptons, opting to visit lesser known locales like Sharpes, Florida; Tangier Island, Virginia; and Montauk, New York. There he found people who celebrated the departure of the tourists with the cautious hope they’d return next summer.

Discovering America on Winter's Shore. Your purchase helps support NPR programming. Journeying from the Florida Keys to northern Maine between Labor Day and Memorial Day, this unusual travelogue explores both off-the-beaten-path locales as well as seasonal destinations abandoned after the summer to reveal America's coastal communities and the colorful individuals that make these places their home year round Original.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Off-Season is a moving portrait that brings to life the magic of the sea and shore in winter, the charm of beach towns emptied of summer crowds, and the warmth and eccentricities of year-round coastal residents who revel in small-town spirit.

Ken McAlpine is the author of ten books. His latest thriller NEXUS is a cerebral JAWS. His non-fiction work OFF SEASON: DISCOVERING AMERICA ON WINTER’S SHORE was a Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Thank you for your kind interest. ly moving beyond anything we know. Our oceans are changing. Ken’s magazine articles have earned three Lowell Thomas awards, travel writing's top award.

No Longer the Forgotten SeasonJust after Labor Day, Ken McAlpine said good-bye to his family and began a drive up the East Coast, from Florida to Maine, on a one-man quest to capture the elusive “forgotten season” of beach towns shuttered until the return of warm weather. Off-Season is a moving portrait that brings to life the magic of the sea and shore in winter, the charm of beach towns emptied of summer crowds, and the warmth and eccentricities of year-round coastal residents who revel in small-town spirit.McAlpine skipped the more popular destinations like Nags Head, Virginia Beach, Cape May, and the Hamptons, opting to visit lesser known locales like Sharpes, Florida; Tangier Island, Virginia; and Montauk, New York. There he found people who celebrated the departure of the tourists with the cautious hope they’d return next summer. He encountered fishermen struggling to make a living, a former playboy lifeguard now ministering to the elderly and ill, a marine policeman both reviled and respected, a lone kayaker paddling away his grief, a couple fighting to save the world’s coral reefs, divers searching for everything from false teeth to dead bodies in dark waters, and deserted snow-covered beaches more beautiful than anyone could describe.More than a travelogue—and a whole new breed of beach read—Off-Season is a stroll off the beaten path and a look at the people and places in our country that keep the spirit of community alive.

Globus
I really had high hopes for Ken McAlpine's Off-Season:Discovering America on Winter's Shore. When I got to Quoddy Head I just didn't feel fulfilled. Not that this travel book didn't have its good moments, but you know that point in a vacation where you just want to get home, that's how I felt reading this book. In the author's quest to give us "local color" he at times drones on. The highlights of the book were his trips to Tangier and Hog Islands. But, the last third of the book was rushed. In the beginning of the book McAlpine dawdled and this might be the reason why there just wasn't any meat at the end. His constantly reminding the reader how he just wasn't another tourist and endeared himself to the "locals" started to make my teeth hurt after awhile. Finally, I grew up within 30 minutes of the Atlantic Ocean and Delaware Bay and it seemed to me like in the Mid-Atlantic and New England states the author skipped over quite a bit. This tome to the loneliness of a winter's sea is just OK, kinda like a soggy peanut butter sandwich at the end of a day at the beach.
Vetitc
Great book!
Nnulam
Enjoyed the book, nice to read a book that is not designed to promote one thing or area. This was a good record of author's travels with lots of interesting side bars and characters.
Mogelv
Wonderfully descriptive language and vivid personalities. Makes me want to go to the Outer Banks and learn more of the history of the area.
Manona
Captures the essences of the people he meets in an objective manner. Magically describes the places he visits with poetic detail an easy read that keeps your attention
Kison
Consider the sad fate that has overtaken the word "tourist" in recent years.
It started out meaning simply someone who travels somewhere to see the local sights. But over time it has taken on a strong odor of disapproval. "Tourists" arrive in huge crowds, create congestion, behave rudely, drink too much, speak in weird accents, leave trails of litter behind them and condescend to the locals. Economically they are a necessary evil in the eyes of residents (I once heard a board member of Colonial Williamsburg complaining about the damage inflicted there by tourists: "Couldn't they just stay home and send the money?").
Ken McAlpine, however, is a different kind of tourist. Unhappy with the stress and bustle of American life in general, he set out --- alone --- in his van to find places where what he considers the true spirit of "real" America survives. His hunting ground was the East Coast, from the Florida Keys to Lubec, Maine. And just to show that he was no typical tourist, he traveled in midwinter, largely avoiding the better-known tourist roosting places in favor of out-of-the-way areas, like the spot on the New Jersey shore where one resident told him, "We don't want people to know where Strathmere is." No Sanibel, Hilton Head, Cape May or Hamptons for Ken McAlpine.
McAlpine has chronicled this offbeat odyssey in a deftly written memoir. He is an experienced travel writer with a nice gift for simile and metaphor and a gift for seeking out crusty local characters who seem wedded to the places they inhabit. OFF SEASON is enjoyable reading, but it also has a subtle undercurrent of concern for an imperiled American lifestyle that McAlpine treasures. He deplores the creeping advance of urban sprawl toward the unspoiled places he finds, and he sides unashamedly with the small-town heroes who are fighting against it.
The major East Coast cities --- Norfolk, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Boston --- are either skirted entirely or summarily dismissed as obstacles to be got through as quickly as possible en route to more interesting places like the Outer Banks of North Carolina, Tangier Island, VA, or Montauk at the eastern tip of Long Island.
McAlpine has a thing for "the loveliness of islands." Fishermen, beaches and water bulk large in his narrative. He went to the trouble of packing a kayak into his van so he could periodically go off by himself and paddle around looking for exotica, human, vegetable and animal. And the casual reader will painlessly learn a fair amount about fish and fishing. Several of the places he visits can be reached only by boat. There are no maps in OFF SEASON, so it is a good idea to have an atlas handy as you read.
Summer weather was still around in the Florida Keys when he started out in October, but as he gets farther north winter is an increasingly bold presence, culminating in a harrowing night spent in a ditch when his van slid off an isolated rural road in Maine. He finds his interest shifting from meeting colorful people to spending time alone, tramping beaches or exploring inlets to drink in a sense of inner peace.
The spirit of this engaging book is well captured by the picture on its cover. A group of empty canvas beach chairs stand, backs to the viewer, looking out over a flat expanse of water. A thin line on the horizon suggests, rather than depicts, a far shore. A lone gull inspects the scene. Not a "tourist" in sight.
--- Reviewed by Robert Finn
Windforge
Throughout his life the ocean has mesmerized Ken Alpine; the effect on his soul by the ocean has been tremendous. He even states that he was almost born and he kissed his true love by the ocean's edge. What interests him are individuals who are also connected to the ocean and who live within its vicinity year round. In OFF SEASON Ken Alpine embarks on a physical, albeit emotional, journey north from Florida to Maine during the autumn and winter months after the departure of the tourists to ascertain the authentic edge of the Atlantic Ocean.

I have very little experience with the East Coast so reading this book was refreshing. I gained a new perspective of how these small communities survive and have evolved throughout the decades and their inhabitants. Soon after beginning this book it is clearly apparent that Alpine is no fan of tourism and the development of the oceanfront. He continually laments the commercialization and homogenization of society and it's destructive forces; during his journey he deliberately avoids the large tourist resorts in favor of the unforgotten fishing towns that border the Atlantic.

If you don't mind repeatedly being bombarded with Alpine's political agenda OFF SEASON is a meaningful, innovated travelogue of one man's fascination and concern with the ocean and the individuals who make their living near it year around. Recommended.
Journalist Ken McAlpine's decision to travel slowly from Florida to Maine in the dead of winter could not have been more appropriate. Familiar miasmic tourist locations like Key West, the Outer Banks, the Jersey Shore, Long Island's East End, coastal Connecticut, Rhode Island and the Cape all take on new sheen and character under McAlpine's pen. I couldn't help but be jealous for all the solitude and friendship he found on his frigid but warm winter trips. Anyone who has appreciated a quiet, special location when the tourists were all gone will doubtless appreciate the dialog, the characters and the voyage itself. As several reviewers have already noted, McAlpine's fresh travel log achieves and instills an admiration, respect and vigorous hope for an America in which there is still so much originality, warmth and community. Thanks to McAlpine, we can recognize that hope. I loved this book.