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by Pamela Petro
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Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Author:
    Pamela Petro
  • ISBN:
    000655010X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0006550105
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Flamingo (October 16, 2009)
  • Pages:
    336 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1358 kb
  • ePUB format
    1750 kb
  • DJVU format
    1773 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    593
  • Formats:
    azw txt lrf lrf


She has since taught Welsh and travel writing in the USA. She regularly contributes to the New York Times Travel Section and to. .Amazing that so many people around the world speak Welsh, as either natives or "wannabes. I found Petro an interesting and amusing writer

She has since taught Welsh and travel writing in the USA. She regularly contributes to the New York Times Travel Section and to Planet, and has compiled a guide to New England. This is her first ‘real’ book. She has, by the way, no Welsh blood. I found Petro an interesting and amusing writer. Loved her subtitles with Welsh verbs. I don't think she proved her point of speaking more Welsh in other countries than Wales, but nevertheless couldn't put the book down.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and .

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Studying in Lampeter, Dyfed, and learning Welsh, Pamela Petro found it infuriating that whenever – in the post office, at the butcher’s, in the pub – she stumbled with her Welsh, the locals would – kindly, they thought – always revert to English: ‘English is so much easier for you, izznit?’

Often being spoken back to in English.

Often being spoken back to in English. Jan 01, 2019 Maryla Crosski rated it liked it. A well written travel story that captivates at the beginning and the end, but loses you completely in the middle

So she decided to go where English was not an option (.

Studying in Lampeter, Dyfed, and learning Welsh, Pamela Petro found it infuriating that whenever – in the post office, at the butcher’s, in the pub – she stumbled with her Welsh, the locals would – kindly, they thought – always revert to English: ‘English is so. Much easier for you, izznit?’. So she decided to go where English was not an option (.

The dialogue alternates between English and Welsh, with French subtitles

The dialogue alternates between English and Welsh, with French subtitles. Thank god Argentina is still four months away. The Welsh chat group is in a furore because someone has surmised that Jefferson Davis, the president of the Confederacy, was Welsh, and asks if anyone has noticed the number of professional baseball players with Welsh surnames.

Studying in Lampeter, Dyfed and learning Welsh, Pamela Petro found it infuriating that whenever she stumbled with her Welsh, the locals would always revert to English. She decided to go where English was not an option - all kinds of unlikely places with long-standing Welsh-speaking communities. She visited the Hong Kong Men's Choir, all Chinaman who sing in Welsh; the Japanese bardic "eisteddfod" in Tokyo; the Welsh golfers of Oslo; the diners of the Paris Welsh society; and Patagonia. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

Travels in an Old Tongue: Touring the World Speaking Welsh by Pamela Petro. What others are saying

Travels in an Old Tongue: Touring the World Speaking Welsh by Pamela Petro. What others are saying. Travels in an Old Tongue: Touring the World Speaking Welsh by Pamela Petro (1997-08-04). Vintage Corgi Mom Gift Dog Owner Welsh Corgi Mother Hoodie.

Pamela Petro, an American of Hungaro-German blood, had the bright idea of visiting the overseas Welsh. Petro's self-consciously infectious tones will make some Welsh readers feel distinctly ill. Her global pursuit of the Dai-aspora takes her to Norway, Belgium, India, Singapore and Japan and Patagonia. At the same time, having once studied in Lampeter, she resolves to learn Welsh. What happens is that an obsession with collecting gets in the way of the sort of patient and empathetic observation that makes or breaks a travel book. Justin Wintle.

Электронная книга: Pamela Petro Travels in an Old Tongue: Touring .

Электронная книга: Pamela Petro Travels in an Old Tongue: Touring the World Speaking Welsh.

The idiosyncratic and witty travelogue of a young Welsh-speaking woman who travels the globe in search of Welsh communities.


Skrimpak
As a longtime learner of Irish, I can relate to Pamela Petro's predicament. She wished to better her basic Welsh, picked up in a two-month intensive course at the U of Wales, Lampeter, but also needed to avoid the trap of falling back on English when practicing her Welsh in Wales itself! With her roommate, she decides to travel five months around wherever Welsh expats and learners lurked in other countries, assuming that if she went to Norway or Singapore or Argentina, that the lack of English from her co-respondents would force them both into Welsh. This only worked best in her final destination, (providing the strongest part of her narrative, and by far the most assuredly conveyed) the remnant of the Patagonian Welsh pioneering community. But, in the meantime she, a travel writer anyway by profession, manages to cram in everything that happened to her.

This makes the results here better than the average travelogue, for she relentlessly focuses upon the question of what it is to be Welsh. Is it native speaking of the native language? Or simply learning it? If so, how perfectly? Not knowing it but being proud of one's Welsh birth anyhow? Not being Welsh (Pamela's category) by any heritage but simply enamored with the idea and ideals of Wales? The hierarchy she discovers among the Welsh she encounters reveals persistent unease with always another--elusive and not there present--person's level of Welsh being better than whoever she talks to at that moment. Pamela battles through many drinks at soirees, singing contests, and stilted conversations along with the usual mishaps on the road.

At times, she describes her surroundings well. Often, however, the book reads like transcriptions and elaborations of that past day's chitchat from her copious notebooks, sometimes in prose and detail too earnestly cute and so rather limp on the page although probably lively enough in person (especially with a couple more drinks!). Too many often mundane incidents blur together, but you too feel her jet lag, queasiness, hangovers, or general disembodiment all too well. Whether this is what you want in a travel account is up to you. This book could have done with severe editing and not lost its flavor. It gets too giddy and self-consciously meticulous for long stretches. True, the admirable enthusiasm Pamela generally has is infectious but not always that contagiously rewarding for the loyal reader.

Therefore, I recommend this book to those interested in how languages and cultures merge and clash in a globalized world (the book takes place around 1995) but with the warning that it does take a lot of patience and that after awhile the incidents jumble and blur as one country follows another without respite. An admirable conceit, but rather wearisome. You do feel like you're with Pamela every faltering step of the way, however!

[Those curious about the workings and the impacts of Welsh will enjoy Janet Davies' compact "The Welsh Language: A Pocket Guide" (1999, U of Wales P). For a gloomier perspective on the state of the Celtic languages and cultures today, and a much more pessimistic outlook unfortunately on the Patagonian Welsh, see Marcus Tanner's 2003 "The Last of the Celts" from Yale UP.]
Adrietius
I love languages and the Welsh people I happen to have met so far, so i am enjoying the idea behind this book. However, the story is not so gripping that I feel an urge to continue reading it every day, and I keep getting side-tracked to other books. I am now about half way through it and will definitely finish it, though. It may even turn out to be a "keeper."
More information about how Welsh is pronounced would have been welcome.
Weiehan
Amazing that so many people around the world speak Welsh, as either natives or "wannabes." I found Petro an interesting and amusing writer. Loved her subtitles with Welsh verbs. I don't think she proved her point of speaking more Welsh in other countries than Wales, but nevertheless couldn't put the book down. Well done.