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by Mungo Park
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Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Author:
    Mungo Park
  • ISBN:
    0907871046
  • ISBN13:
    978-0907871040
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Eland Books; 2 edition (March 15, 2004)
  • Pages:
    384 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1733 kb
  • ePUB format
    1729 kb
  • DJVU format
    1487 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    115
  • Formats:
    mbr doc rtf lrf


Travels in The Interior of Africa" Mongo Park 1799. Mungo Park was one of the most intrepid of these men and this journal of his exploration into Africa is outstanding. His descriptions of the flora and fauna are minimal, but intriguing.

Travels in The Interior of Africa" Mongo Park 1799. Many early explorers of Africa blasted their way through the continent with superior fire power. In contrast Mongo Park, a twenty three year old physician, brazenly chooses to travel solo, relying on his charm and wit to explore the interior of West Africa. Park's travel log of exploration is filled with humorous anecdotes, yet the reader is left incredulous that he has somehow managed to survive. He is robbed, beaten and held hostage.

Travels in the Interior Districts of Africa. Travels in the Interior of Africa (Wordsworth Classics of World Literature). The "good, the bad, and the ugly" are all here, and it is written in a straightforward and manly style. To me he was truly one of the greatest explorers of all times!

Park was employed to journey solo though unknown lands to seek out the legendary city of Tambuctoo and try and ascertain the course of, and if possible, termination point of the river Niger.

Book from the collections of. Harvard University.

Mungo Park, Anthony Sattin.

Mungo Park (11 September 1771 – 1806) was a Scottish explorer of West Africa

Mungo Park (11 September 1771 – 1806) was a Scottish explorer of West Africa. After an exploration of the upper Niger River around 1796, he wrote a popular and influential travel book titled Travels in the Interior Districts of Africa in which he theorized the Niger and Congo merged to become the same river.

With the backing of Sir Joseph Banks, Park was employed (for £11 a month) to journey solo though unknown lands to seek out the legendary city of "Tambuctoo" and try and ascertain the course of, and if possible, termination point of the river Niger.

Mungo Park, a Scottish surgeon and explorer, was sent out by the 'Association for Promoting the Discovery of the Interior of Africa' after Major Houghton failed to return, to discover the if the River Niger was a tributary of either the river Senegal or Gambia in South Africa

Mungo Park, a Scottish surgeon and explorer, was sent out by the 'Association for Promoting the Discovery of the Interior of Africa' after Major Houghton failed to return, to discover the if the River Niger was a tributary of either the river Senegal or Gambia in South Africa. This is the story of his first trip. Most of the trip he had nothing but his tattered clothes, a horse, a pocket compass and his hat where he kept his notes

A decade later, he returned to Africa on an ill-fated second mission, this time sponsored by the British government.

A combination of two journeys, Scotsman Mungo Park's story of his first trip in 1795 as a 24-year old, and again in 1805, provided Europeans with their first reliable description of the interior of the continent. The first trip was full of an endearing vulnerability and the heroic generosity of a fit young man, while the second was one of Conradian tragedy, murder, and mayhem. Despite starvation, imprisonment, and frequent illness, he managed to keep a record. Though he failed in the object of his mission-to chart the course of the Niger River-he did succeed in exploring West Africa and opening in trade routes. His first-hand experiences of tribal justice, gold mining, and the slave trade are recorded, as well as his own understated heroism, a story of courage, open-hearted friendship, and betrayal. His vivid record of his travels brought a new image of Africa to the European public, though the continent claimed him for itself in death. Travels is still considered the most readable of all the classics of African exploration.

virus
It is a fantastic and thrilling story written in a very humble tone with an aparant ambition to present what actually happened. It is surprisingly free from prejudice, written at a time when I did not think this objectivity existed. A remarkable achievement.
Paster
Amazing travelogue of English 'gentleman explorer' in Africa.
Onetarieva
Personally, I don't like Amazon's 5 star rating system, in my opinion too many people rate books 5 star, which in my mind would be a book 100% perfect in every category. To me this is practically unattainable. So I give this book a 5 star rating with reservations, I would prefer a 4 3/4 rating if this were possible. There should be a 7 star rating system, with 7 stars being practically unattainable.
Having said this, this is the greatest work of travel and exploration I have ever read. And I have read the greatest, all the African greats; Burton, Baker, Stanley, Livingston, Mary Kingsley & etc., etc. Also the North American giants; Lewis & Clark, Champlain, La Salle, Jedediah Smith and the rest; and most of the South Americans of fame, Spruce, Bates, Humbolt, Dr. Richard Schultes et.al. And last but not least the the Asian explorers, such as Doughty, Thessiger, Hedin and many more. I say this so you know where I'm coming from. But "Travels into the Interior of Africa" by Mungo Park is my favorite. Read it and you may agree with me, I don't know why this book is so ignored, especially after reading so many rave reviews on Amazon on Mary Kingsley's, "Travels in West Africa" {but she deserves it}.There are heart touching as well as humorous scenes in this book especially in his encounters with African women. Park's courage, perseverance, humility, humanity and his empathy for the African peoples he encounters as well as his informative account of the exotic makes this book a great read. The "good, the bad, and the ugly" are all here, and it is written in a straightforward and manly style.To me he was truly one of the greatest explorers of all times!
The "Eland" edition I have is of fairly good quality, but overpriced.