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by Maria Coffey
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Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Author:
    Maria Coffey
  • ISBN:
    0099460335
  • ISBN13:
    978-0099460336
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Arrow (December 1, 2003)
  • Pages:
    240 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1339 kb
  • ePUB format
    1458 kb
  • DJVU format
    1428 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    264
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Such clarity and honesty are seldom seen in mountain writing.

Such clarity and honesty are seldom seen in mountain writing.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Fragile Edge: A Personal Portrait of Loss on Everest as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Having previously read Maria Coffey's fascinating and excellent book "Where the Mountain Casts Its Shadow: The Personal Costs of. .Fragile Edge" is the story of her relationship with Joe Tasker, who disappeared high on Mt.

Having previously read Maria Coffey's fascinating and excellent book "Where the Mountain Casts Its Shadow: The Personal Costs of Climbing," I was already familiar with the broad strokes of the story in her memoir "Fragile Edge: A personal portrait of loss on Everest. I knew I would like this book because Coffey really has something interesting to say. "Fragile Edge" is the story of her relationship with Joe Tasker, who disappeared high on Mt. Everest, along with his climbing partner Pete Boardman in 1982

Such clarity and honesty are seldom seen in mountain writing

Such clarity and honesty are seldom seen in mountain writing. Greg Child, author of Postcards from the Ledge Critically acclaimed Fragile Edge won the coveted the International Literary Mountain prize for Maria Coffey's eloquently written story of how climbing tragedies affect those who are left behind. This is a powerful story describes how she survived the loss of her long-time partner, dealing with the sorrow and confusion, anger and healing.

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Fragile Edge : Loss on Everest.

Publisher: The Mountaineers Books. Print ISBN: 9780898867374, 0898867371. eText ISBN: 9781594853364, 1594853363. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781594853364, 1594853363. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780898867374, 0898867371.

An intimate story of personal cost, risk, and loss in the mountaineering world. You're getting the VIP treatment! With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart.

Critically acclaimed Fragile Edge won the coveted the International Literary Mountain prize for Maria Coffey's .

Critically acclaimed Fragile Edge won the coveted the International Literary Mountain prize for Maria Coffey's eloquently written story of how climbing tragedies affect those who are left behind. With openness and honesty, Coffey describes her love affair with elite British mountaineer Joe Tasker, who perished with his climbing partner Peter Boardman while attempting Everest's then-unclimbed Northeast Ridge in 1982.

a personal portrait of loss on Everest. Published 2000 by Mountaineers Books in Seattle, WA. Written in English. Mountaineers, Protected DAISY, In library, Biography, Mountaineering. Maria Coffey (1952-). Everest, Mount (China and Nepal), Great Britain.

Nobody has written more eloquently about the human side of high altitude mountaineering then Maria Coffey. In this new edition of Fragile Edge, she describes her love affair with elite British mountaineer Joe Tasker, who perished with his partner Peter Boardman while attempting Everest's then unclimbed Northeast Ridge in 1982. Coffey relives her experiences, first within the hard-partying mountaineering scene and then during her long journey to understanding and acceptance of the tragedy that cost her the man she loved. She gives us an insider's view of the life of a world-class mountaineer and recounts her deeply moving pilgrimage with Boardman's widow across Tibet; a journey which retraced Tasker and Boardman's steps to their abandoned Advance Base Camp at 21,000 feet on Everest.

Zepavitta
What happens to the loved ones of mountaineers who perish while seeking to climb higher peaks or pioneer new routes on challenging mountains? The author attempts to answer this question with her well written and deeply personal account.

The author was intimately involved in the mountaineering world of the nineteen seventies and early nineteen eighties. At the time she was in the throes of an intense love affair with Joe Trasker, the British climber who perished in 1982 with his regular climbing partner, Peter Boardman, while attempting to climb the then unclimbed Northeast ridge of Everest.

The author offers an intriguing, birdseye view into the tight circle of the mountaineering elite through her relationship with Joe Trasker. The book, however, is not about climbing, per se. It is more of a personal catharsis of her relationship with Joe Trasker.

Still, this makes for an interesting read. The book is divided into two parts. The first concerns itself with the Joe that was living. The second part concerns itself with the Joe that had perished.

The first part chronicles their relationship, which was intense. It also seemed to be a little one sided. The author makes it fairly clear to the reader that Joe Trasker did not seem to have the same commitment to the relationship that the author seems to have had. Her reluctance to let the relationship go appears to have been based more upon what the relationship could have been, rather than upon what it actually was. As they say, love is blind.

The second part of the book chronicles her coming to terms with his death. She does this by joining up with Peter Boardman's widow, Hilary, and setting off on a journey to Tibet and, ultimately, to Everest in an attempt to connect to Joe one final time, as well as to seek closure to a part of her life that was no more.

Sensitively written and finely drawn, her pain is palpable and her story moving. It is, above all, a fitting tribute to Joe Trasker, the man who inspired such devotion.
Kieel
What happens to the loved ones of mountaineers who perish while seeking to climb higher peaks or pioneer new routes on challenging mountains? The author attempts to answer this question with her well written and deeply personal account.

The author was intimately involved in the mountaineering world of the nineteen seventies and early nineteen eighties. At the time she was in the throes of an intense love affair with Joe Trasker, the British climber who perished in 1982 with his regular climbing partner, Peter Boardman, while attempting to climb the then unclimbed Northeast ridge of Everest.

The author offers an intriguing, birds-eye view into the tight circle of the mountaineering elite through her relationship with Joe Trasker. The book, however, is not about climbing, per se. It is more of a personal catharsis of her relationship with Joe Trasker.

Still, this makes for an interesting read. The book is divided into two parts. The first concerns itself with the Joe that was living. The second part concerns itself with the Joe that had perished.

The first part chronicles their relationship, which was intense. It also seemed to be a little one sided. The author makes it fairly clear to the reader that Joe Trasker did not seem to have the same commitment to the relationship that the author seems to have had. Her reluctance to let the relationship go appears to have been based more upon what the relationship could have been, rather than upon what it actually was. As they say, love is blind.

The second part of the book chronicles her coming to terms with his death. She does this by joining up with Peter Boardman's widow, Hilary, and setting off on a journey to Tibet and, ultimately, to Everest in an attempt to connect to Joe one final time, as well as to seek closure to a part of her life that was no more.

Sensitively written and finely drawn, her pain is palpable and her story moving. It is, above all, a fitting tribute to Joe Trasker, the man who inspired such devotion.
Eseve
What happens to the loved ones of mountaineers who perish while seeking to climb higher peaks or pioneer new routes on challenging mountains? The author attempts to answer this question with her well written and deeply personal account.
The author was intimately involved in the mountaineering world of the nineteen seventies and early nineteen eighties. At the time she was in the throes of an intense love affair with Joe Trasker, the British climber who perished in 1982 with his regular climbing partner, Peter Boardman, while attempting to climb the then unclimbed Northeast ridge of Everest.
The author offers an intriguing, birdseye view into the tight circle of the mountaineering elite through her relationship with Joe Trasker. The book, however, is not about climbing, per se. It is more of a personal catharsis of her relationship with Joe Trasker.
Still, this makes for an interesting read. The book is divided into two parts. The first concerns itself with the Joe that was living. The second part concerns itself with the Joe that had perished.
The first part chronicles their relationship, which was intense. It also seemed to be a little one sided. The author makes it fairly clear to the reader that Joe Trasker did not seem to have the same commitment to the relationship that the author seems to have had. Her reluctance to let the relationship go appears to have been based more upon what the relationship could have been, rather than upon what it actually was. As they say, love is blind.
The second part of the book chronicles her coming to terms with his death. She does this by joining up with Peter Boardman's widow, Hilary, and setting off on a journey to Tibet and, ultimately, to Everest in an attempt to connect to Joe one final time, as well as to seek closure to a part of her life that was no more.
Sensitively written and finely drawn, her pain is palpable and her story moving. It is, above all, a fitting tribute to Joe Trasker, the man who inspired such devotion.