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by John Mandeville,C. W. R. D. Moseley
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Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Author:
    John Mandeville,C. W. R. D. Moseley
  • ISBN:
    0140444351
  • ISBN13:
    978-0140444353
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Penguin Classics; No Edition Stated edition (February 7, 1984)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1104 kb
  • ePUB format
    1944 kb
  • DJVU format
    1644 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    514
  • Formats:
    txt lrf mbr mobi


Sir John Mandeville left his native St Albans in 1322 and died in Liege in 1372. As the wonderful introduction by . Moseley put it, if Mandeville didn't actually do any traveling, that only increases his literary value

Sir John Mandeville left his native St Albans in 1322 and died in Liege in 1372. Moseley put it, if Mandeville didn't actually do any traveling, that only increases his literary value. But really, The Travels needs little aid when it comes to value. As a piece of literature, it is easily the best travel book to come out of the Middle Ages, saving perhaps the history of Marco Polo's travels. I could probably go so far as to include the eras following the Middle Ages, but having read very few travelogues from anything beyond the Middle Ages, I'm reluctant to do so.

By John Mandeville Introduction by C. W. R. D. Moseley Translated by C. Moseley. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. Category: History Nonfiction Classics Travel Writing Biography & Memoir. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. About John Mandeville.

Moseley (Translator). Mandeville himself, the narrator invented by whoever wrote this book, is chatty and funny. Ostensibly written by an English knight, the Travels purport to relate his experiences in the Holy Land, Egypt, India and China. See 2 questions about The Travels of Sir John Mandevill. ists with This Book.

Imprint: Penguin Classics. Published: 31/03/2005. The Travels of Sir John Mandeville. Ostensibly written by an English knight, the Travels purport to relate his experiences in the Holy Land, Egypt, India and China

Imprint: Penguin Classics. C. Moseley (Translator).

The world of Sir John Mandeville was bounded by fantasy, superstition, and dread. In the England of the 14th century, the vast majority would have viewed a visit to the next village as a major event.

Sir John Mandeville is the supposed author of The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, a travel memoir which first circulated between 1357 and 1371. The earliest surviving text is in French.

John Mandeville (Penguin Classics) torrent or any other torrent from the Other E-books. Details for this torrent.

Download The Travels of Sir John Mandeville (Penguin Classics) torrent or any other torrent from the Other E-books. The Travels of Sir John Mandeville (Penguin Classics). Although Marco Polo's slightly earlier narrative ultimately proved more factually accurate, Mandeville's was widely known, used by Columbus, Leonardo da Vinci and Martin Frobisher, and inspiring writers as diverse as Swift, Defoe and Coleridge.

Items related to Travels of Sir John Mandeville (Penguin Classics)

Items related to Travels of Sir John Mandeville (Penguin Classics). Mandeville, John Travels of Sir John Mandeville (Penguin Classics). ISBN 13: 9780140444353. Travels of Sir John Mandeville (Penguin Classics). Ostensibly written by an English knight, the Travels purport to relate his experiences in the Holy Land, Egypt, India, and China.

Inspiring writers as diverse as Swift, Defoe and Coleridge, 'The Travels of Sir John Mandeville' is a rich and often fantastical travel narrative from the 14th century, combining geography and natural history with romance and marvels. ISBN 13: 9780141441436.

Author: John Mandeville The simple faith of our childhood in a Sir John Mandeville, really born at St. .

Author: John Mandeville. Character set encoding: ISO-646-US (US-ASCII) . Start of the project gutenberg ebook the travels of sir john mandeville . The simple faith of our childhood in a Sir John Mandeville, really born at St. Albans, who travelled, and told in an English book what he saw and heard, is shattered to pieces.

Immediately popular when it first appeared around 1356, The Travels of Sir John Mandeville became the standard account of the East for several centuriesâ?a work that went on to influence luminaries as diverse as Leonardo da Vinci, Swift, and Coleridge. Ostensibly written by an English knight, the Travels purport to relate his experiences in the Holy Land, Egypt, India, and China. Mandeville claims to have served in the Great Khan’s army and to have journeyed to “the lands beyond”â?countries populated by dog-headed men, cannibals, Amazons, and pygmies. This translation by the esteemed C.W.R.D. Moseley conveys the elegant style of the original, making this an intriguing blend of fact and absurdity, and offering wondrous insight into fourteenth-century conceptions of the world.

Includes a revised introduction, appendices, an index of place names, new notes, and updated suggestions for further reading

Gathris
This is the modern English translation. I needed middle English for my class but it saved me the headache of trying to understand what was going on. A very happy mix up.
Jaberini
The question of whether Mandeville really did travel to these places or whether he even existed, is, from a literary perspective, inconsequential. As the wonderful introduction by C.W.R.D. Moseley put it, if Mandeville didn't actually do any traveling, that only increases his literary value. But really, The Travels needs little aid when it comes to value. As a piece of literature, it is easily the best travel book to come out of the Middle Ages, saving perhaps the history of Marco Polo's travels. I could probably go so far as to include the eras following the Middle Ages, but having read very few travelogues from anything beyond the Middle Ages, I'm reluctant to do so. As a historical document, its importance is again, far reaching and cannot be over-stressed. Even after much of the more fantastical elements were winked at, the more serious notions were considered of great value by explorers.
Now, like all travelogues I've ever read--fictional and non--it is hit or miss. The parts in which he is essentially naming city after city, monument after monument, and people after people in rapid secession is "unentertaining" to say the least. To a modern reader, it's relatively useless outside of academia. But his stories and asides are what bring the book to life. I never recommend a reader skip any part of a book--at least upon the first read--but especially not in a piece like this. Just when you think he's giving you another list that's just like the ones that came before, he'll throw in a little story or an aside that captures your attention and imagination. There's whole literatures bound up in some of his sentence long comments and stories. I'm still fascinated by the story he gave of a man who traveled farther and farther, seeing wonders increasingly great, until, the greatest wonder of all, he found an island where they spoke his native language; but due to lack of supplies, he was forced to turn back. While this story of an explorer's circumnavigation of the globe is unlikely to be true, its poetical value far outweighs any value we could derive from the truth of it. A metaphor for this book, perhaps?
There is one last thing I'd like to address in this review. I've read in a couple of places that this book is full of racism and misogyny. I can't fully criticize a casual reader for not fully grasping a Medieval work, especially if they've not removed their own modern mindset--or, at least, learned somewhat about the Medieval mindset--but these claims are simply not true. The Travels is easily one of the most accepting and broad-thinking books I've read from the Middle Ages. For example, when he talks of the Brahmin, he discusses the notion that just because they don't hold to the Christian faith does not mean they're evil or doomed to hell, but rather takes what most would agree is a modern view, namely that "we know not whom God loves nor whom He hates." And for many of his first readers, his book may have been the first time where Muslims were not described as essentially devils in human form. In fact, the only time a "Christian" prejudice seeps into his writing is when talking about cannibalism, and I think we can all agree that it's not just Christians that have a prejudice against cannibals, even if it is unlikely that there were as many cannibals as he described. I think another reason why this has been misunderstood is that, to the casual reader, his subtle use of what we would call "sarcasm" is lost. A case in point, when he describes the burning of a man's wife at his funeral. He then briefly says that if a man does not want to, he does not have to be burned with his dead wife. There is a bite in his statement, and it was meant to have one.
Of course, don't go in expecting a 21st century thinker. He was a 14th century man and you'll be hard pressed to forget that; however, even keeping that in mind, this book does show that a 14th century man was not as "unenlightened" as many would have you believe.
SARAND
Perfect condition, and fair price. No tears of any kind and no pages missing. Price was fair and did not feel like I was mislead at all.
sobolica
okay
Mr.Champions
A glimpse into the 14th century mind-set is an adventure in time-travel - see the basis of all subsequent literature involving utopian fantasy and social satire. The introduction is masterly!
Bajinn
Unfortunately one is directed from the Penguin edition of the book to the kindle digital edition without a clear notice that it is not the same book. The work may be the same, but it lacks the 40 page introduction, and appendix. Also, it is not the same translation. It's a bit frustrating that the book is advertised as the penguin edition when it is not. I find it particularly odd for amazon to do this since when one is looking at a book's preview (Look inside!) one is always told when the book shown is not the same as the one advertised if that is the case.
Aloo
Great!
This curious book from the late middle Ages had a tremendous impact on the Renaissance mind. Leonardo da Vinci had a copy, so did Columbus, and so did Frobisher. So much of how the early explorers reacted to what they found was influenced by their expectations. Their expectations were mostly derived from Marco Polo, Pliny the Elder, and Sir John Mandeville. Mandeville was allegedly an Englishman who wrote in French. He claimed to have traveled to the Middle East, where he worked for the Sultan, and into Africa, Asia, and India. At least one critic, however, believed that the most traveling he ever did was to the library. The book is a curious mixture of anthropological observations that are mostly accurate (techniques of warfare, dining manners, family relationships) and utterly fantastic biological observations, such as trees that bear fruit containing living animals inside them. It is a fascinating work because it offers insight into how people thought of earth (and heaven) before Columbus. I found this a valuable reading experience. I’d especially recommend it to fans of Marco Polo and Hakluyt. Four stars.