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by Mark Hampton
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Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Author:
    Mark Hampton
  • ISBN:
    0252029461
  • ISBN13:
    978-0252029462
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Illinois Press (August 30, 2004)
  • Pages:
    232 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1252 kb
  • ePUB format
    1158 kb
  • DJVU format
    1543 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    239
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This is an important, groundbreaking book that establishes Mark Hampton as a major scholar in the field.

In Visions of the Press in Britain, 1850-1950, Mark Hampton argues that qualities expected of the contemporary British press-lively writing, speed, impartiality, depth, and the ability to topple corrupt governments by informing readers-are not obvious attributes of journalism but derive from more than a century of debate. This is an important, groundbreaking book that establishes Mark Hampton as a major scholar in the field.

Historians recognize the cultural centrality of the newspaper press in Britain, yet very little has been published regarding competing conceptions of the press and its proper role in British society.

Visions of the Press engages with the important issue of the relationship between democratic political . One of the strengths of this book is the way in which Mark Hampton traces key historiographical debates in press history.

Visions of the Press engages with the important issue of the relationship between democratic political culture and the press. This timely work gives voice to the elites who contemplated the effects of a changing world where newspapers increasingly came to serve as the intermediaries between the British people and their government. Arranged chronologically, the book reconstructs one hundred years of debates between journalists, intellectuals, and newspaper proprietors over the role of the press that first started in the Victorian period

This book is printed on paper suitable for recycling and made from fully managed and sustained forest sources.

This book is printed on paper suitable for recycling and made from fully managed and sustained forest sources. Logging, pulping and manufacturing processes are expected to conform to the environmental regulations of the country of origin.

Published online by Cambridge University Press: 21 December 2012. Export citation Request permission.

Using memoirs, novels, parliamentary debates, unpublished papers, and periodicals, he postulates that the Victorians had two principal "visions" of the press: educational and representative.

Visions of the Press in Britain, 1850-1950 by. Mark Hampton.

Visions of the Press in Britain, 1850-1950. Urbana and Chicago: the University of Illinois Press, 2004.

Mark Hampton sets out to analyse 'the way in which British elites conceptualized the press between 1850 and 1950' . The book finishes with a brief consideration of the post World War II Royal Commission on the Press.

Mark Hampton sets out to analyse 'the way in which British elites conceptualized the press between 1850 and 1950', examining the debates that helped to lead the British press to the point where 'informing readers and toppling governments, and never in boring fashion, could appear as the appropriate function of journalism'. Its completion date, 1949, does not fully justify the centennial dates in the title. This book starts well before 1850 and ends in the 1930s.

Historians recognize the cultural centrality of the newspaper press in Britain, yet very little has been published regarding competing conceptions of the press and its proper role in British society. In Visions of the Press in Britain, 1850-1950, Mark Hampton surveys a diversity of sources--Parliamentary speeches and commissions, books, pamphlets, periodicals and select private correspondence--in order to identify how governmental elites, the educated public, professional journalists, and industry moguls characterized the political and cultural function of the press. Hampton demonstrates that British theories of the press were intimately tied to definitions of the public and the emergence of mass democracy in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.