» » Southern Rock Review

Download Southern Rock Review fb2

by Martin Popoff
Download Southern Rock Review fb2
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Author:
    Martin Popoff
  • ISBN:
    1896522734
  • ISBN13:
    978-1896522739
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Collector's Guide Publishing, Inc. (August 1, 2001)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1735 kb
  • ePUB format
    1304 kb
  • DJVU format
    1164 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    422
  • Formats:
    lrf lit doc azw


gets attention in Popoff's book. Just like his 1997 tome, "The Collector's Guide to Heavy Metal," Popoff's opinions are sharp and funny.

Popoff does an outstanding job of digging deep and providing factual information on lesser known, yet equally important groups like Cowboy, Doc Holliday, Jackyl, The Henry Paul Band and Point Blank. gets attention in Popoff's book.

Hell, his struggle with the Marshall Tucker Band discography is almost existential (he gives up in 1983). including Christmas Time Again (he scores it 7/10 and notes "the critics lambasted this thing out the backdoor and around the yard a few times.

Listen to episodes of History in Five Songs with Martin Popoff on Podbay. Listen to episodes of History in Five Songs with Martin Popoff on Podbay.

Martin Popoff (born 1963) is a Canadian music journalist, critic and author. He is mainly known for writing about the genre of heavy metal music. He has been called "heavy metal's most widely recognized journalist" by his publisher. Popoff lives in Toronto, Ontario.

Martin Popoff has been described as the world's most famous heavy-metal .

He has penned many books on various bands, genres of rock, and record collecting, including Voyageur Press' Rush: The Illustrated History; Metallica: The Complete Illustrated History; The Art of Metal; and The Big Book of Hair Metal.

Published August 1, 2001 by Collector's Guide Publishing Inc.

Martin Popoff’s Time And A Word is a welcome reminder that these musicians were still people, in all their complexity and .

Martin Popoff’s Time And A Word is a welcome reminder that these musicians were still people, in all their complexity and contradiction, and especially the time leading up to a famous and bitter schism in the early eighties, resulting in Chris Squire alone as Yes and Anderson, Bruford, Wakeman and Howe continuing as themselves. This takes on poignancy with the recent death of Chris Squire and a moving obsequy is provided by Steve Hackett.

Город: Toronto, CanadaПодписчиков: 1 ты. себе: Cranker-outer of 85-ish heavy metal book. себе: Cranker-outer of 85-ish heavy metal books; about had enough but can't quit caring.

Southern Rock’s rich recorded heritage is compiled and reviewed in this handy reference guide.

Uickabrod
This is an excellent review guide of Southern Rock Albums. It's all there from A to Z, in alphabetical order by band name,and then album by album, making it very easy to look up album reviews about any particular Southern Rock Band, or Artist. The book is packed with photos of Southern Rock album covers. The author, rates every album on a scale of 1 - 10.

This book was copyrighted around 2001, so it only contains the Southern Rock Bands, up until that point. There have been some other Southern Rock Bands to emerge since then, and also there have been many new Southern Rock albums released since then. Also, the author, Martin Popoff, admits that he did miss a few, that should have been included. One of the main criteria he used to select bands is that they must actually be from 14 southern states, which includes the states that were in the Confederacy, the border states, & Oklahoma. He also discusses some other criteria he used his classification of Southern Rock.

The book contains album reviews on the more popular Southern Rock bands, such as The Allman Brothers Band, Lynyrd Skynyrd, The Charlie Daniels Band, Wet Willie, and others. Plus, it also contains dozens & dozens of lesser known southern rock bands, along with reviews of their albums. It's packed full of illustrations of Southern Rock album covers.

I'm not sure where the author Martin Popoff got all this information, but he sure did an excellent job. He does list a bibliography & some Southern Rock Artists that he interviewed, such as Donnie & Johnny Van Zant, the late Jakson Spires (of Blackfoot) and others.

The book contains two appendixes as follows:

Appendix I - "Southern-ish" - This is a list of bands that did not meet his criteria for being classified as Southern Rock Bands, however, they are very, very similar in the style of music that they play. Some of these bands include: Alabama, Gram Parsons, Creedence Clearwater Revival,
New Riders of the Purple Sage, Little Feat, and many, many others.

Appendix II - This is a list of the authors top 122 Southern Rock Albums. He rated them on a scale of 1 - 10, and he has a list of 17 10's, 24 9's, and 81 8's. Also, throughout the book he rates the southern rock albums on a scale from 1 - 10.

The book contains an index of the many, many Southern Rock album cover photos in the book. Plus, there's an index in alphabetical order by band name.

This is an excellent reference book on Southern Rock for Southern Rock Fans, and I certainly am one. It's a very handy-dandy (Go Jim Dandy!!!) reference guide. I love Southern Rock, and I love this book, therefore, I highly recommend it. Buy it, see it, you'll love it also. Thanks!!!!
Hurus
Hello just thought I'd give the 10 tracks on the CD sampler:

1. THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND - RAMBLIN' MAN

2. LYNYRD SKYNRYD - SWEET HOME ALABAMA

3. ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION - SO INTO YOU

4. DUANE ALLMAN - GOIN' DOWN SLOW

5. WET WILLIE - KEEP ON SMILIN'

6. HYDRA - LAND OF MONEY

7. DIXIE DREGS - NIGHT OF THE LIVING DREGS

8. SEA LEVEL - TEAR DOWN THIS WALL

9. STEVE EARLE - COPPERHEAD ROAD

10. ELVIN BISHOP - FOOLED AROUND AND FELL IN LOVE

- After reading the book and listening to the CD sampler, I realized I like Southern Metal (ie., Molly Hatchet & Blackfoot). Although the book is a good reference for the (much) less heavier bands in the genre.
Ceck
In the 1970s Southern bands were at the top of rock music. Martin Popoff's Southern Rock Review rates hundreds of southern rock albums and gives each a score from zero to ten. Popoff has strong opinions and his book is a great argument starter for fans.

To Popoff, the "true" southern-rock era was from the late-1960s to the early-1980s. Most of the albums that he reviews come from those years. Hard-core fans will enjoy Popoff's reviews of "lost bands" - talented groups that never quite made it.

Popoff prefers blue-sy, hard rock music. Therefore, he likes the Allman Brothers, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Molly Hatchet, and Blackfoot. He is tougher on pop bands, such as .38 Special and (especially) the Atlanta Rhythm Section.

The book offers many extras. At the end, there is a page that lists the albums that Popoff rated as 8's, 9's, and 10's. Also, there is a separate index of "southern-ish" bands - those that sound close to southern rock, but didn't make the cut.

The book is supposed to include a bonus Southern rock CD, but I borrowed a library copy and the CD was long gone. The song list is quite good. But, some of the songs are by artists that Popoff does not review in the book (The Dixie Dregs and Steve Earle).

Popoff definitely needed an editor. There are many typos - such as "Duanne Allman," "Cooperhead Road," and a reference to "Sturgis, North Dakota."

Southern Rock Review is a unique book that offers fun, light reading. It isn't the sort of book that people will pick up and read cover to cover, but it's fun to thumb it on a lazy Sunday while listening to some old LPs.
Xaluenk
... the lack of a Confederate flag on the front cover. The reason for this is that the author, Martin Popoff, is from Canada -- that makes the whole country "South" for him. ....
As for the book itself, it's the only one I know of that takes Southern rock seriously as a movement--and it doesn't quiver at doling out harsh truths as well, such as the self-parody of the recent Skynyrd output. Actually, I would have liked Popoff to have expanded his definition a bit (he did include an "If You Like Southern, You Might Like..." section in the appendix, which included all the bands that I wish he'd have fully included) but it was also brave to actually hold himself to the geography and include only bands that came from the South itself. Gutsy and idiosyncratic as Popoff always is, his writing reaches beautiful heights when speaking about the first solo Dickey Betts album, a gentle, delicate, unassuming work that reeks genius. Eat a peach, indeed. And buy this book.