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by David Brodsky
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Words Language & Grammar
  • Author:
    David Brodsky
  • ISBN:
    0292718101
  • ISBN13:
    978-0292718104
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Texas Press; Bilingual edition (February 1, 2008)
  • Pages:
    653 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Words Language & Grammar
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1585 kb
  • ePUB format
    1304 kb
  • DJVU format
    1443 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    538
  • Formats:
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This approach is suitable for beginners as well as for advanced students.

David Brodsky,, who currently resides in Aix-en-Provence, France, is also the author of Spanish Verbs Made Simple(r) and . To be honest, now that I have read this book, I'm not sure that an etymological approach is the best way to learn Spanish vocabulary. In fact, I rather doubt that it is.

David Brodsky,, who currently resides in Aix-en-Provence, France, is also the author of Spanish Verbs Made Simple(r) and French Verbs Made Simple(r). He holds advanced degrees from MIT and Yale University. For the first two or three thousand words, flashcarding is probably the most efficient approach. After that, a lot of reading and looking up unknown words will build your vocabulary up in a natural and effective way.

Spanish vocabulary Spanish. An English speaker learning Spanish starts with one huge, though generally phone book approach Spa. Practice Makes Perfect: Spanish Vocabulary (Practice Makes Perfect Series). Light on Life: The Yoga Journey to Wholeness, Inner Peace, and Ultimate Freedom. 51 MB·51,443 Downloads.

By the author of Spanish Verbs Made Simple(r) and French Verbs Made Simple(r)-an innovative approach to learning Spanish vocabulary based on understanding the etymology of Spanish words. This is a print-on-demand title. 653 pages 6 1/8 x 9 1/4.

Spanish Vocabulary : An Etymological Approach. This approach is suitable for beginners as well as for advanced students.

Spanish vocabulary : an etymological approach, by David Brodsky. Spanish Vocabulary: An Etymological Approach offers elements rarely found in a work addressed to a nonspecialist audience, including:. st ed. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references. ISBN -- (cl. : alk. paper) - ISBN -- (pbk. paper) Spanish Vocabulary: An Etymological Approach offers elements rarely found in a work addressed to a nonspecialist audience, including:. etymological connections between Spanish and English vocabulary. historical and linguistic information on the origin and evolution of Spanish.

Free 2-day shipping This book is a fascinating and in-depth look at the Latin roots of many, many .

His approach differs from those that value memorization drills of long lists of words, phrases, and idioms.

Do you find it useful? readable? Do you have the e-book or the printed book? ¡Mucho gracias!

Do you find it useful? readable? Do you have the e-book or the printed book? ¡Mucho gracias! 701 views. posted by markfilipak. I don't have it, but if your interested in linguistics, I think it could be helpful. Jubilado, Oct 4, 2016.

Unlike other vocabulary guides that require the rote memorization of literally thousands of words, this book starts from the premise that using the etymological connections between Spanish and English words—their common derivations from Latin, Greek, and other languages—is the most effective way to acquire and remember vocabulary. This approach is suitable for beginners as well as for advanced students. Teachers of the language will also find much material that can be used to help motivate their students to acquire, and retain, Spanish vocabulary.

Spanish Vocabulary is divided into four parts and four annexes:

Part I provides background material on the origins of Spanish and begins the process of presenting Spanish vocabulary.Part II presents "classical" Spanish vocabulary—words whose form (in both Spanish and English) is nearly unchanged from Latin and Greek.Part III deals with "popular" Spanish vocabulary, which underwent significant changes in form (and often meaning) during the evolution from Latin to Spanish. A number of linguistic patterns are identified that will help learners recognize and remember new vocabulary.Part IV treats a wide range of themes, including words of Germanic and Arabic origin, numbers, time, food and animals, the family, the body, and politics.Annex A: Principal exceptions to the "Simplified Gender Rule"Annex B: 700 words whose relations, if any, to English words are not immediately obviousAnnex C: -cer verbs and related wordsAnnex D: 4,500 additional words, either individually or in groups, with English correspondences

Thabel
To be honest, now that I have read this book, I'm not sure that an etymological approach is the best way to learn Spanish vocabulary. In fact, I rather doubt that it is. For the first two or three thousand words, flashcarding is probably the most efficient approach. After that, a lot of reading and looking up unknown words will build your vocabulary up in a natural and effective way. Studying etymology as an approach to learning vocabulary is a bit of overkill, in my opinion.

That having been said, I am still giving this book five stars. Why? Well, there are several reasons.

Firstly, this book is an impressive work of scholarship. The author ranges quite widely in his discussion of etymology. Although his main focus is the connections between Spanish and English, in order to explore the reasons for the similarities and differences between the two languages he must examine - at least to some extent - the historical development of both languages and their connections with other European languages (particularly Latin, but French, German, Italian, and other languages also receive some attention). He demonstrates a consideral amount of erudition in conducting his examination: many disparate threads of history, linguistics, and etymology - and even some religion and politics - are drawn together by the author in investigating his themes. In fact, the scope of, and level of detail in, this book are rather amazing. Not only is there a great deal of general etymological and historical discussion, but the book also contains a large number of wordlists/charts which contain concrete examples (sometimes copious numbers of them) of the matters being discussed. In fact, probably more than half of the text consists of such charts, often listing Latin, Spanish, and English words in parallel to demonstrate some etymological point. An enormous amount of work must have gone into just the preparation of these charts alone.

Secondly, although the book is fairly scholarly in approach and even in some sense technical, it is accessible to a layperson. You really don't need to know Latin, French, German, or any languages other than English and perhaps some Spanish to understand the discussion. The author gives you the information you need about the languages mentioned in order to understand his points. You could even probably get by without knowing much Spanish at all: everything is made quite clear. And you don't need to know anything about linguistics or etymology to follow along. I have no background in either, but I had no problem grasping the author's points.

Finally - and at least from my personal perspective, most importantly - this book is actually full of interesting stuff. When I bought this book, I bought it for a very practical reason: I hoped that knowing something about Spanish etymology would help my ongoing acquisition of Spanish vocabulary. When I started reading the book, I was viewing it from the perspective of someone who was trying to learn the Spanish language, not someone seeking to engage in any kind of academic inquiry. And I do think that the book served my original purpose to some extent, although perhaps not in the way that I thought it would.

However, this book is very interesting in its own right, independent of any language-learning benefits. It is brimming with insights about the way languages develop, shift, diverge, and modulate over time; and in particular how Spanish, and to a lesser extent English, did so. Notwithstanding the substantial level of detail, the author manages to keep the discussion lively and interesting. There are many fascinating digressions, both in the text and in footnotes, that flow naturally from the discussion and add flavor to it. Even if I had not learned a single new Spanish word from this book, I would have found it rewarding and thought-provoking.

I am not really sure what kind of readership this book would be suitable for. Some curiosity about language in general and and a strong interest in Spanish in particular would probably be necessary to fully appreciate it. The book is long (over 600 pages) and dense, and it takes a considerable amount of time and a reasonable amount of attention to get through it. There is a lot of useful information to be mined from the book's copious charts, but you would have to put in some effort to do so. So the book is probably not appropriate for someone looking for some light reading.

Still, I wouldn't have thought that I would have enjoyed this book so much as I did, or gotten as much out of it as I did, if someone had just described it to me. It actually surprises me a bit that I made it all the way through. I think my almost total ignorance of etymology probably helped: practically everything was new and fresh to me. In any event, somehow this book captured my interest from the beginning and never let it go, and in the process my perception of language changed in some fundamental way. I no longer look at language simply as a tool for communicating with others; I now also look at it as a kind of museum, full of history and exhibits, some interesting, some not-so interesting, and some whcih are curiosities. Or perhaps as a palimpsest with tantalizing fragments of older writings still visible beneath the latest text, which require some detective work to be even partly understood.

In any event, I cannot really recommend this book to anyone because I am not sure whom to recommend it to. To some (or perhaps even most) people, it might be a nightmare of dense text, long wordlists, and obscure footnotes. But to anyone who is curious, who values knowledge for its own sake, and who is interested in a leisurely stroll through a language museum containing much that is familar and much that is strange, and who is willing to take a quick glance and move quickly past some exhibits which are a bit dull, and pause for a more careful look at others which are not, there is much of interest here....
Alsalar
The information in this book is priceless and helpful, unfortunately it was not written in a very logical and easy to use lay out so it makes it hard to use the book. But if you can overlook the shortcomings it is a great book for learning the etymology of the Spanish language in order to help you learn vocabulary.
Danskyleyn
This is a fascinating book, more than vocabulary it is story of how Spanish 'works.' As an aid in expanding one's vocabulary, I have found it invaluable.
Frdi
For those lucky people who learned (some) Latin, speak (moderately well) English, have some idea of French (or/and Italian) it's a rare gem. You may know Spanish quite well or you may be an absolute beginner - you will get your money value back.
GoodBuyMyFriends
Nice tool . Will there be a new edition with a few minor corrections? There is no /v/ in Spanish,p.148 and p. 209. Diphthongs /ie/ are never pronounced like s in pleasure or z in measure, p.111. And on p.113 bendito, maldito, maldicho.
Shliffiana
I use this book as a teaching aid to help students build vocabulary fast. It is safe and effective, with no side effects. :)
Whitebeard
very nice
I'm sorry, a background in Latin is really essential for the book to be worthwhile.
I was interested to discover the changes from classical Latin to Spanish and wish I had studied Latin previously.