» » Weeds in the garden of words : further observations on the tangled history of the English language

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by Kate Burridge
Download Weeds in the garden of words : further observations on the tangled history of the English language fb2
Words Language & Grammar
  • Author:
    Kate Burridge
  • ISBN:
    0733314104
  • ISBN13:
    978-0733314100
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    ABC Books (2004)
  • Pages:
    272 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Words Language & Grammar
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1398 kb
  • ePUB format
    1373 kb
  • DJVU format
    1328 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    323
  • Formats:
    lrf lit docx azw


Linguistic weeds may be slang expressions, non-standard pronunciations, or constructions that are out of place.

Linguistic weeds may be slang expressions, non-standard pronunciations, or constructions that are out of place. But what one gardener calls a 'weed', another may call a 'flower'. The same goes for words and their usage in English.

"Professor Kate Burridge". Monash University Faculty of Arts. Retrieved 11 January 2015. Taylor & Francis Journals: Welcome. Kate Burridge: ^ ABCTV - Can We Help? - Meet the Team. Monash University Staff Page.

Professor Kate Burridge's book is approachable, entertaining and fun - designed to browse through and . about all its little tricky eccentricities Weeds in the Garden of Words is the perfect book for people who love English.

Professor Kate Burridge's book is approachable, entertaining and fun - designed to browse through and find oneself hooked by fascinating pieces on such topics as why verbs move to nouns and vice versa, why pronunciation may differ from place to place, why regionalisms develop and the creative way of slang and jargon.

Cambridge univ press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on August 5, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

People who love English – the way words are used and put together to create meaning; the arcane rules and .

Like its predecessor, it has now been republished by Cambridge University Press.

Linguistic weeds may be defined as pronunciations or constructions that are no longer used

Linguistic weeds may be defined as pronunciations or constructions that are no longer used

Читать бесплатно книгу Weeds in the garden of words.

Читать бесплатно книгу Weeds in the garden of words. Доступны электронные, печатные и аудиокниги, музыкальные произведения, фильмы. На сайте вы можете найти издание, заказать доставку или забронировать. Возможна доставка в удобную библиотеку. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2005.


grand star
In Weeds in the Garden of Words, linguist Kate Burridge compares the English language to a garden. There are some flowers that look lovely, but your neighbor, who considers herself a gardening expert, says they are weeds. Should you follow her advice and root them up? Maybe it depends on your definition of weed.

Taking a completely different approach from verbal hygienists (Burridge's phrase) such as the ever-cranky Lynne Truss (Eats, Shoots & Leaves), Burridge observes the evolution of English, without making judgments. She discovers that quite often, what is now considered correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, or pronunciation, used to be considered wrong. And vice versa. Because language is always changing, it's difficult to pin it down at any point in time and declare once and for all that the double negative is wrong and that the direct object form of "who" must be "whom." When people are using "incorrect" English every day and still managing to communicate effectively, who's to say what's wrong?

Well, there are always plenty of self-appointed fusspots and arbiters of linguistic goodness (as Burridge calls them) who want everyone to follow the rules they learned when they were in school. I suspect that the only people who read that type of book are people who already know the rules and just want to catch the author in a mistake.

For those who are interested in what unpredictable routes the English language is taking, Weeds is an entertaining collection of short essays that Burridge originally presented on the radio. She explores new words such as "earworm," a term for the tune you get into your head and can't get out. She muses over new trends such as the tendency to pronounce words such as "assume" as "ashoom." And she compares the different ways English is used in the United Kingdom, the United States, and in Australia (Burridge is Australian).

As a recovering stickler, I enjoyed reading this enthusiastic celebration of English in all its forms.
funike
A bit slow to start, but interesting facts, etymologies. Got me thinking about language, what we take for granted as English speakers.