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Download Culture Shock! Bolivia: A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette (Culture Shock! Guides) fb2

by Mark Cramer
Download Culture Shock! Bolivia: A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette (Culture Shock! Guides) fb2
Etiquette
  • Author:
    Mark Cramer
  • ISBN:
    0761424881
  • ISBN13:
    978-0761424888
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Marshall Cavendish Intl (February 15, 2007)
  • Pages:
    300 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Etiquette
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1334 kb
  • ePUB format
    1781 kb
  • DJVU format
    1360 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    157
  • Formats:
    mobi rtf txt doc


Culture Shock! Bolivia: A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette.

Culture Shock! Bolivia: A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette. Download (pdf, . 3 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

Culture Shock! Ecuador: A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette. CultureShock! normally provides readers with a solid introduction to the culture and traditions of a country (Volker Poelzl's & Brazil is excellent), but this guide gives you nothing but trite & sophomoric babel. Mark Cramer's writing totally fails to do justice to the complex ethos of Bolivia

Culture Shock! Mexico: A Guide to Customs & Etiquette.

CultureShock! Bolivia provides readers with a thorough understanding of this South American country, a nation steeped in history, culture, and tradition. Containing pages of useful information, advice, tips and resources, this book will guide you through the social and psychic adjustment necessary when moving to Bolivia. Culture Shock! Mexico: A Guide to Customs & Etiquette.

Guides) CultureShock! Egypt is invaluable to anyone who wants to blend into life in the country whose existence revolves around the River Nile. Containing much insight about the Egyptian people the class system, the importance of family, their sense of honor – this guide also provides useful information and advice for settling into your new home and getting along with the locals. For example, learn about their notion of space and eye contact, and how the men may perceive foreign women who smile at them

Details for this torrent Do you have a culture shock for Japan? I would like to read one of those.

Details for this torrent. Culture Shock! China: A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette. Type: Other E-books. Do you have a culture shock for Japan? I would like to read one of those. SectorVector at 2012-01-04 19:45 CET: just google it john doe. Its there. You'll find it and much more. I'd recommend Paul Merton in China. I don't think there's one for Japan. There seems to be one from Samantha Brown. Also try the documentary, around the world in 80 treasures by dan cruickshank. it is an interesting well presented series.

Culture Shock! Austria: A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette. and etiquette guides covering countless destinations around the world. 24 MB·199 Downloads·New! and etiquette guides covering countless destinations around the world. For anyone at risk of culture. Culture Shock! Egypt: A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette. 31 MB·188 Downloads·New! A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette in Egypt. Culture Shock! Chile: A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette. 97 MB·155 Downloads·New!, and entertaining crash courses in local customs and etiquette. Culture Shock! South. Learn, first and foremost, how to deal with soroche (altitude sickness), then understand the importance to the Bolivians of Pachamama (Mother Earth) and how she influences festivals and joyous occasions. Discover how to interact with the many diverse cultures, from Kallawayas.

Culture Shock! Bolivia book. Bolivia by Mark Cramer. Culture Shock! Bolivia: A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette (Cultureshock Bolivia: A Survival Guide to Customs & Etiquette).

Instead of guiding you deeper into the customs, culture and etiquette (the normal focus of & Shock!' guides) . This book is packed with all kinds of information on Bolivia as a country and as a culture. It reads like a novel, as opposed to most fact-filled books.

Instead of guiding you deeper into the customs, culture and etiquette (the normal focus of & Shock!' guides) Cramer takes a hike. He attempts to turn the book into a travel guide, and not a good one at that. I sat down with this book knowing very little about Bolivia; Now I feel like I've been there. I look forward to seeing the pages come to life this summer as I venture into this amazing country. This is a MUST read for those wanting to know about Bolivia and its people.

Whether youre conducting business, traveling for pleasure, or even relocating abroad, one mistake with customs or etiquette can leave a bad taste in everyones mouth

Whether youre conducting business, traveling for pleasure, or even relocating abroad, one mistake with customs or etiquette can leave a bad taste in everyones mouth. International travelers, now more than ever, are not just individuals from the United States, but ambassadors and impression makers for the country as a whole.

A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette in Bolivia


Wizard
Not much is known about this country and this book had the essential to understand it's culture and people. Buen Viaje!!
Efmprof
This book never arrived, so I wasn't very satisfied with the delivery. The book might be fine though. I didn't bother re-ordering it because I already have enough on my reading list before I depart for Bolivia!
Vonalij
I disagree with the previous reviewer. I gained a lot of insight into Bolivia from this book. It was exactly what I was looking for: a light read on Bolivia. It's certainly not the definitive guide on the "complex ethos of Bolivia", but judging by the size (it's not a long book, folks), anyone who expects a definitive guide is kidding themselves.

The book does offer a brief overview of certain topics of interest. I don't think the author was out of line to make a joke about international awareness and cocaine. After all, that topic has received international attention, and there is, indeed, way more to Bolivia than the coca industry.

The section on etiquette explained to me why my Bolivian husband must say goodbye to each and every person individually when we leave a social gathering when I feel its sufficient to just wave and and say, "Later!"

I enjoyed the author's humor, tone, and American perspective.

BUT, why on earth would the publisher skimp so much on the binding? It literally did fall apart in my hands on the first reading. Pages came right out from the simple act of turning them.

It was a good read, but I did return the book because it fell apart, so perhaps 4 stars is overly generous. However, poor binding is not the author's fault.
Xlisiahal
This work is abysmal. CultureShock! normally provides readers with a solid introduction to the culture and traditions of a country (Volker Poelzl's `CultureShock: Brazil is excellent), but this guide gives you nothing but trite & sophomoric babel.

Mark Cramer's writing totally fails to do justice to the complex ethos of Bolivia. Nothing of significance is said about religion, how Catholicism blended with the religion of the Incas at the time of the Conquistadores to create a rich syncretism of religious forms that now is expressed in most all Bolivian festivals and the in daily expressions of belief. He fails to expose the rich complexity of Bolivian folklore. You will find nothing significant about the culture, the bruised psyche of this divided nation, the pride and self-sufficiency of the country's poor, nor the exploitations of the wealthy. Cramer's writing throughout the books is superficial.

To example only a few, in the section titled `Aymara & Quechua Art', Cramer states, "Thanks to Aymara and Quechua art and music, international awareness of Bolivia is not limited to stereotypes about cocaine." Cocaine? The Aymara & Quechua have rich histories, brilliant music and unique languages, but no they are best know for blow! Give me a break. He opens the section on food sections by saying "Bolivia offers attractive diet options, from indigenous health foods to Hispanic cholesterol." Hispanic cholesterol!

Add to this insulting writing, the injury that the book's binding comes apart with one reading. Pages fall out almost as soon as you open the book.

If you are looking for a general introduction to Bolivia you would be better served by Lonely Planet: Bolivia 2007. The best cultural expose is found in William Powers' excellent and powerful account of living in Bolivia, "Whispering in the Giant's Ear". As an ethonography on the Bolivian culture Mark Cramer's CultureShock! completely fails.
KiddenDan
I agree with both reviewers before me: while the book does give you some interesting information about Bolivian culture, it is an immensely disappointing read.

The author's love of Bolivia is contagious and should make most readers want to see that country for themselves. However, love is completely blind in this book, and it ends up sounding like a 1970's tourist brochure from a country behind the Iron Curtain.

For example: "In Bolivia, pharmacists still assume that adults are discerning enough to handle basic medical information and will dispense medicines over the counter that require prescriptions in countries with more 'developed' professions."

Really? Could it not be that pharmacists are just looking to make another sale, regardless of how much or how little their client knows about the antibiotics or antidepressants they are buying without seeing a doctor? I assume that he spoke at length with Bolivian pharmacists before reaching such a conclusion.

I say this because I grew up in Brazil, where pharmacists were just as happy to sell anyone prescritpion drugs. Whenever my tonsils acted up, my mother would get me some penicillin (a drug called Penveoral). In my teens, when I had a sore throat I would just walk down to the drugstore and pick up the pills myself. It was like getting rid of ants with a taser gun. It's no wonder that the so-called "super bacteria", ie. drug-resistant strains, are much harder to kill in Brazil than in Japan (yes, I read a study).

If the author is going to offer up questionable interpretations for what seems like pure ignorance or neglect on the pharmacists' side, he should at least corroborate his claim by showing, for example, how small the problem of self-medication is in Bolivia.

Unfortunately, the book is full of such examples of faulty reasoning, distortions of facts and facile comparisons with other countries.

By all means read this book if you want to know that even though both 110 and 220V co-exist in Bolivia, the government is "trying" to phase out 110V. It will teach you that the word "maestro" is a title used to address bus drivers, electricians, plumbers. This is indeed interesting and useful information for travellers to Bolivia, so the book is not completely useless.

Do NOT, however, expect the book to shed any meaningful light on the cultural differences between Bolivia and the United States, where the author is from, or any Western country for that matter. As part of a series called "Culture Shock!", such shortcomings turn it into a failure.