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by International Labor Office
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Encyclopedias & Subject Guides
  • Author:
    International Labor Office
  • ISBN:
    9221206289
  • ISBN13:
    978-9221206286
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  • Publisher:
    International Labor Office; Reprint edition (June 24, 2009)
  • Pages:
    140 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Encyclopedias & Subject Guides
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The result was the 1998 Declaration of the ILO on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.

The result was the 1998 Declaration of the ILO on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. The ratification of the ILO Conventions on these rights has reached record levels. ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work and its Follow-up.

The cost of coercion. INTERNATIONAL LABOUR CONFERENCE 98th Session 2009 Report I(B). Global Report under the follow-up to the ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. International labour office geneva. ILO publications can be obtained through major booksellers or ILO local offices in many countries, or direct from ILO Publications, International Labour Office, CH-1211 Geneva 22, Switzerland. Visit our web site: ww. lo.

The Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work was adopted in 1998, at the 86th International Labour Conference. It is a statement made by the International Labour Organization "that all Members, even if they have not ratified the.

The Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work was adopted in 1998, at the 86th International Labour Conference

This report sheds new light on forced labor in today's global economy

This report sheds new light on forced labor in today's global economy. It examines the daunting challenges faced by the many actors and institutions involved in a global alliance against forced labor, from the conceptual and political to the legal, juridical, and institutional. It shows how challenges have been met so far, often with the support or involvement of the ILO, and points to substantial examples of good practice that can guide future efforts. The report expands on the estimates of the 2005 Global Report on forced labor-that put the total number at 1. million people worldwide and calculated the profits generated in one year by trafficked forced laborers at 32 billion dollars.

Child labour continues to be a global phenomenon - no country or region is immune, the report says. The report also says that of these children: - about 111 million in hazardous work who are under 15 and should be "immediately withdrawn from this work"

Child labour continues to be a global phenomenon - no country or region is immune, the report says. The report also says that of these children: - about 111 million in hazardous work who are under 15 and should be "immediately withdrawn from this work". an additional 59 million youths aged 15-17 should receive urgent and immediate protection from hazards at work, or also be withdrawn from such work. some . million children are caught in "unconditional" worst forms of. child labour including slavery, trafficking, debt bondage and other forms of forced labour, forced recruitment for armed conflict, prostitution, pornography and other illicit activities.

International Labour Conference, 98th Session 2009,Report I (B) Includes bibliographical references. No current Talk conversations about this book.

The 1998 ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work commits ILO member states to respect, promote and realize the principle of the elimination of all forms of forced labour as one of the four fundamental.

The 1998 ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work commits ILO member states to respect, promote and realize the principle of the elimination of all forms of forced labour as one of the four fundamental principles, even if they have not ratified the forced labour Conventions. The article 2 of Convention No. 29 defines as: "all work or service which is exacted from any person under the menace of any penalty and for which the said person has not offered himself voluntarily. The key elements of this definition are:. Menace of any penalty is to be understood in a very broad sense.

Global Report under the Follow-up to the ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. 2. Follow-up to the Declaration (flow diagram) Encouraging efforts to respect fundamental principles and rights at work. 3. Table of ratifications of ILO Conventions Nos. INTERNATIONAL LABOUR CONFERENCE 89th Session 2001. 29 and 105 and annual reports submitted under the Declaration follow-up in relation to the elimination of all forms of forced or compulsory labour. 4. International instruments relevant to forced labour.

Follow-up to the Declaration . Report form on freedom of association, and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining. Report form on the elimination of all forms of forced or compulsory labour. Annex 1. Whereas the ILO is the constitutionally mandated international organization and the competent body to set and deal with international labour standards, and enjoys universal support and acknowledgement in promoting fundamental rights at work as the expression of its constitutional principles

This report sheds new light on forced labor in today's global economy. It examines the daunting challenges faced by the many actors and institutions involved in a global alliance against forced labor, from the conceptual and political to the legal, juridical, and institutional. It shows how challenges have been met so far, often with the support or involvement of the ILO, and points to substantial examples of good practice that can guide future efforts. It highlights the need for administrations and inspectorates to be at the forefront of action against forced labor and human trafficking, complementing other law enforcement and prevention mechanisms.

The report expands on the estimates of the 2005 Global Report on forced labor that put the total number at 12.3 million people worldwide and calculated the profits generated in one year by trafficked forced laborers at 32 billion dollars. These figures still form the most accurate estimate of the extent of forced labor worldwide. This report reveals new figures focusing on the cost of coercion to the victims of forced labor.

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