» » Modern Aramaic-English/English-Modern Aramaic Dictionary & Phrasebook: Assyrian/Syriac

Download Modern Aramaic-English/English-Modern Aramaic Dictionary & Phrasebook: Assyrian/Syriac fb2

by Nicholas Awde
Download Modern Aramaic-English/English-Modern Aramaic Dictionary & Phrasebook: Assyrian/Syriac fb2
Dictionaries & Thesauruses
  • Author:
    Nicholas Awde
  • ISBN:
    0781810876
  • ISBN13:
    978-0781810876
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Hippocrene Books; Bilingual edition (June 1, 2007)
  • Pages:
    300 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Dictionaries & Thesauruses
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1830 kb
  • ePUB format
    1558 kb
  • DJVU format
    1219 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    697
  • Formats:
    lit mbr docx lrf


Modern Aramaic is made up of a number of dialects. The two major ones are Swadaya (Eastern) and Turoyo (Western). This unique dictionary and phrasebook incorporates both dialects in a way that illustrates the differences and gives the reader a complete understanding of both.

Modern Aramaic is made up of a number of dialects. The dialects are presented in an easy-to-read romanized form that will help the reader be understood.

Modern Aramaic-English/En. has been added to your Cart. As described in the title, the book is a combination dictionary and phrasebook which covers two contemporary spoken Aramaic dialects, the Turoyo dialect from the Tur-Abdin area of Turkey, and the Mesopotamian-Lake Urmia Swadaya ('colloquial') dialect originally based in Northern Iraq and adjacent areas of Iran.

Modern ish-Modern Aramaic Dictionary Phrasebook: Assyrian/Syriac Online, Read pdf PDF Modern ish-Modern Aramaic Dictionary.

Modern ish-Modern Aramaic Dictionary Phrasebook: Assyrian/Syriac Online, Read pdf PDF Modern ish-Modern Aramaic Dictionary Phrasebook: Assyrian/Syriac Online, PDF Modern ish-Modern Aramaic Dictionary Phrasebook: Assyrian/Syriac Online Online Download Best Book Online PDF Modern ish-Modern Aramaic Dictionary Phrasebook: Assyrian/Syriac Online, Download Online PDF Modern ish-Modern Aramaic.

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Modern Aramaic or Assyrian is made up of a number of dialects. The dialects are presented in an easy-to-read romanised form that will help the reader to be understood. product description page. Modern ish-Modern Aramaic Dictionary & Phrasebook - by Nicholas Awde (Paperback).

To say Modern Aramaic or Modern Syriac, you must be consistent and say Modern Hebrew, Modern English, Modern . Parts of the bible were written in aramaic, including the books of Erza and Daniel

Parts of the bible were written in aramaic, including the books of Erza and Daniel. The famous writing on the wallŒ, which was seen by Nebuchadnezzar's grandson, Belshazzar, told of the fall of Babylon

Modern ish-Modern Aramaic Dictionary & Phrasebook: Assyrian/Syriac - cover.

Modern ish-Modern Aramaic Dictionary & Phrasebook: Assyrian/Syriac - cover. People also love these ideas. What others are saying. Phoenician Alphabet Chart.

Because the thing that can be found online referred to in this way is not original, not Aramaic, not a translation, and not the Lord's Prayer. Let me elaborate further.

Modern Aramaic (Assyrian/Syriac)/ English-Modern Aramaic: Dictionary and Phrasebook by Nicholas Awde, Nineb Limassu, and Nicholas Al-Jeloo. Saved by. Hippocrene Books. Because the thing that can be found online referred to in this way is not original, not Aramaic, not a translation, and not the Lord's Prayer. This prayer can be found.

Aramaic is now recognised throughout the world as the language spoken by Christ and the Apostles. Contrary to popular belief, however, it is very much a 'living' language spoken today by the Assyrian peoples in Iran, Iraq, Syria and Turkey. It is also heard in Assyrian emigre communities of the US, Europe and Australia. Modern Aramaic or Assyrian is made up of a number of dialects. The two major ones are Swadaya (Eastern) and Turoyo (Western). This unique dictionary and phrasebook incorporates both dialects in a way that illustrates the differences and gives the reader a complete understanding of both. The dialects are presented in an easy-to-read romanised form that will help the reader to be understood.

Cordantrius
I am an American trying to learn modern Assyrian. I bought the Turoyo Aramaic translation of 'Alice's adventures in Wonderland' which was translated very recently to coincide with the 150th anniversary of the book. To my disappointment, I couldn't locate even the first three words of the book in this dictionary in the Turoyo dialect. This dictionary is only a couple hundred pages, AND the dictionary part of it is only about half of the book and on top of that the dictionary is obviously divided into the Swadaya and Turoyo dialect, making it impossible to include most of the words in modern Assyrian/Aramaic. Therefore, this is more of a travel guide. Say you have a boyfriend/girlfriend who's Assyrian and you want to impress his/her parents with speaking their language, or say you're travelling to the Levant and will encounter some Aramaic speakers, or perhaps you go to a grocery store in the Levant where the workers speak Neo-Aramaic, then this is for you. It is NOT for language learners trying to actually adopt and speak the language as a conversational vernacular. Also, I really didn't like the syllabification system because there absolutely is none. You have no clue whether a letter ends or begins a syllable when they are ambiguous. So to conclude, this book is a great work as a travel guide or to assist with understanding and speaking to natives on a basic level for occasional situations you may run into no more than a few times in your life.

Comparing a phrasebook/travel guide to a full dictionary is comparing apples to oranges, but still, when customers type in 'Aramaic dictionary' and see this one, they have no idea it's so vague and unfulfilling. They, like me, probably assume it's a full dictionary with at least most Assyrian words. Again, it's not even close and I could not eve locate the first 3 words of 'Alis bu Celmo dac Cojube w dat Tantelat', or the Turoyo Aramaic version of 'Alice's adventures in Wonderland'.

On the other hand, I have heard that Robert Payne Smith's Aramaic dictionary rarely has words that cannot be found, if you wish to learn Syriac (Turoyo dialect) then you must get something more comprehensive like that. As for Swadaya, I don't think there are even any Swadaya dictionaries available, at least on Amazon.
THOMAS
Great book. My qualm - why explain the alphabets in the beginning, only to discard them for the remainder of the entire book. If this had actual Aramaic writing (with vowels), it would be 4 stars. If, on the other hand, it had
1) estrangela
2) madenkhaya for swadaya and serto for maarboyo
3) transliteration
...for each phrase, I would give it seven stars... you heard (or read) me...seven.
Nenayally
This is a useful dictionary of two varieties of an important living Semitic language. It has lots of words, all written Romanized, so one does not need to learn any native alphabet to read them. But the 3 alphabets are presented too. One problem with the dictionary is the nouns do not have the gender shown, so that makes it harder to create new sentences. But the phrasebook section has plenty of sentences. There is also some cultural information, and especially a good section on the history of the Assyrians. They sure had some tragic centuries, persecuted by pagans, Zoroastrians, Catholics, then Muslims, in particular the genocides by Tamerlane, and then during WWI, I knew about the Armenian genocide but now I see the Ottomans massacred Assyrians too, almost a million. Though not all the info is reliable, the book claims king Abgar corresponded with Jesus himself, but modern scholars think Abgar's letter and Jesus's reply are fake, not from first century. Another error is the claim that Jews of Jesus's time spoke Aramaic, not Hebrew, but in reality a few still spoke Hebrew as their native language and learned Aramaic as a second language. But other info seems reliable from what I have found elsewhere.
Fenrikree
As described in the title, the book is a combination dictionary and phrasebook which covers two contemporary spoken Aramaic dialects, the Turoyo dialect from the Tur-Abdin area of Turkey, and the Mesopotamian-Lake Urmia Swadaya ('colloquial') dialect originally based in Northern Iraq and adjacent areas of Iran. The two dialects seem to be markedly different from one another, but luckily some of the differences fall into regular patterns (for 'hello' Turoyo says "shlomo" and Swadaya says "shlama"). The authors do a good job of integrating the two dialects in the book.

There is a readable, short, historical overview of the sometimes tragic experiences of the language's speakers, generally known as Assyrians or Chaldeans, and a helpful grammar summary that helps you make mores sense of the questions and answers you read in the phrasebook sections. The grammar summary would be more helpful if it had a table showing the full conjugations of half a dozen key verbs and a few sentences explaining the overall pattern (the grammar summary in the Lonely Planet Amharic book is a good example of what I think is ideal).

The striking thing about the phrasebook sections are the number of phrases related to war: "Please show me the minefields" is one of the sentences that caught my attention. I suppose this is a sad commentary on the experiences of people in Iraqi Kurdistan in recent times. I wonder whether a major part of the book's intended audience is the military (I had assumed it would have been mainly the Assyrian-Chaldean ethnic community and some curious individuals interested in Semitic languages, like myself).

I wish, in addition to an expanded grammar section, there was more use of the Eastern or "Nestorian" version of the Syriac script. The authors did present it in a short section, for which I'm grateful, but I would have liked some short texts in the script, as well (perhaps in the dictionary section), even just three of four examples of printed modern Aramaic. I suppose when the script is used the temptation arises to use the classical Syriac form of a word instead of the modern colloquial.

All in all, a fascinating and valuable book. I hope a recorded version is next.