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by Pamela Statham-Drew
Download James Stirling: Admiral and Founding Governor of Western Australia fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Pamela Statham-Drew
  • ISBN:
    1876268948
  • ISBN13:
    978-1876268947
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    UWA Publishing (June 1, 2003)
  • Pages:
    655 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1542 kb
  • ePUB format
    1676 kb
  • DJVU format
    1413 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    788
  • Formats:
    txt docx rtf lrf


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Perth, Western Australia : UWA Publishing, 2003. T1 - James Stirling: Admiral And Founding Governor Of . AU - Statham, Pamela. BT - James Stirling: Admiral And Founding Governor Of . CY - Perth, Western Australia. ER -. Statham P. James Stirling: Admiral And Founding Governor Of . Perth, Western Australia: UWA Publishing, 2003.

Statham-Drew, Pamela (2003). James Stirling: Admiral and Founding Governor of Western Australia. Nedlands, Western Australia: University of Western Australia Press. The following sources were not consulted in the writing of this article: Stirling, T. W. (1933). St Andrews University Press.

James Stirling would remain under his uncle's command until 1808, and would be enormously influenced by his . Statham-Drew, Pamela (2003).

James Stirling would remain under his uncle's command until 1808, and would be enormously influenced by his uncle, both professionally and personally. On 22 July 1805, Stirling took part in the Battle of Cape Finisterre under Sir Robert Calder, during which his squadron attacked the combined French and Spanish fleets off Cape Finisterre.

Drawing on fresh archival material, author Pamela Statham Drew has fashioned an intricate tapestry of engrossing .

Drawing on fresh archival material, author Pamela Statham Drew has fashioned an intricate tapestry of engrossing detail, set against a post-Napoleonic backdrop of colonial opportunism, wars, British naval superiority and shifting political alliances. Stirling's place in history has hitherto been questioned and over-simplified, particularly regarding his contentious West Australian land grants. Man of action, naval officer, able administrator, skilled diplomat - James Stirling's distinguished and multi-faceted career carried him to the four corners of the nineteenth-century world.

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Statham-Drew, Pamela. University of Western Australian Press. Berry Books is commited to a hassle free returns policy. If you are not satisfied with your purchase we well give you a full refund within 14 days of the your receipt of the goods. To instigate a return please contact us below.

James Stirling : admiral and founding governor of Western Australia" Crawley, . Governor of Western Australia - Infobox vice regal state Western Australia shield Shield WesternAustralia

James Stirling : admiral and founding governor of Western Australia" Crawley, . University of Western Australia Press, 2003. History of Western Australia Anglo-Japanese relations. Governor of Western Australia - Infobox vice regal state Western Australia shield Shield WesternAustralia. Stirling - /ˈstɜlɪŋ/ (say sterling) noun 1. Sir Edward Charles, 1848–1919, Australian physiologist and anthropologist.

Pamela Statham-Drew (June 2003). University of Western Australia Press. p. 524. ^ Charles E. Mangles (1859). Metchim & Company. 1. ^ P. L. Cottrell (23 May 2012).

by Pamela Statham-Drew. Select Format: Hardcover. Release Date:June 2003.

Man of action, naval officer, able administrator, skilled diplomat - James Stirling's distinguished and multi-faceted career carried him to the four corners of the nineteenth-century world. This ambitious biography, seven years in the making, breaks new ground in documenting fully Stirling's path from birth into one of Scotland's oldest families, through to founder and Governor of the Swan River Colony and, ultimately, to Admiral and British naval chief in East Asia. Drawing on fresh archival material, author Pamela Statham Drew has fashioned an intricate tapestry of engrossing detail, set against a post-Napoleonic backdrop of colonial opportunism, wars, British naval superiority and shifting political alliances. Stirling's place in history has hitherto been questioned and over-simplified, particularly regarding his contentious West Australian land grants. This absorbing biography seeks to redress this bias while, at the same time, revealing much about the human face and foibles of the man remembered today as the founder of the State of Western Australia.

interactive man
It is widely believed that the period from 1870-1914 heralded the first 'globalization', increasing incomes driven by markets expanding (near) globally, based on varied, known, routes across the seas powered by more reliable and well-harnessed steam power and a relatively stable-valued currency system.
This network of sea routes, outposts, and the knowledge and investment they required was developed earlier by men such as James Stirling. 'Though he died in 1865, the author shows us with élan, meticulous detail and finely grained analysis, how Stirling contributed to setting up the English (and others) to benefit from an expanded and more connected trading world.
The remarkable thing about Stirling is that he seems downright unremarkable. He was a captain much of his life, but in post-Napoleonic Europe, with Britain down-sizing her fleet, he (along with many others presumably like him) were effectively moth-balled. Put on half-pay and sent home. When he did have a command Stirling served well, if unspectacularly, most notably surveying the South American coast, assessing Spanish intentions, and becoming involved in some diplomacy. Which he seems to have carried off skillfully, due in no small part to his willingness to learn the language and customs of those with whom he was dealing.
In the mid-1820s, being directed to deliver supplies to eastern Australia, he also sailed to the west to assess foreign interest in that region. He found some evidence of French and Dutch interest, and reported back to the English government that the area, the south western portion of what is now Western Australia, seemed very fertile, supplied with fresh water, and having several strategic advantages. These included keeping the French out by preempting claim, using it as a re-supply and rest and relaxation point for English troops in India, and providing enough land for a thriving, self-sustaining, colony on its own.
The English government was no-doubt importuned by all sorts of people to back their settlement schemes based on claims quite similar. How to sort the serious from the scammers? Good asymmetric info theorists can find many relevant examples in this book. Drew's insightful and thorough scholarship addresses these problems of asymmetric information adroitly. How did the government try to reduce adverse selection? They only tended to back their own, preferably from their (almost inexhaustible) supply of Navy men, like Stirling. Having proven himself in other theaters, sending a known quantity abroad with His (at the time) Majesty's resources was a lower risk than funding lesser known explorers. How to address moral hazard? Part of Stirling's compensation was through his Naval duties, thus subject to careful review and claw-back if the compensation was deemed unearned. Part was income-in-kind, dependent upon his developing, with his own funds, lands which were granted him at a very low, initial, price, but subject to revocation if improvements were not made within a specified period of time. Stirling had considerable skin in the game. To-boot, he was Governor of the lands, responsible for the well-being and success of the colony. This role he served tirelessly from 1828 to 1838.
Resuming his Naval career after that he served in the Mediterranean, South China Sea, negotiated and completed England's first treaty with post-Perry Japan, chased the Russian fleet around Sakhalin Island (which at the time was thought to be a peninsula) and he helped oversee the introduction of steam-power into the Royal Navy.
Why do I say that he seemed unremarkable? Because, while his service and endeavors fill each page, that one can only read with admiration, one also gets the feeling that the English had many Stirlings. One gets a much better appreciation of England's contribution to coming global connections with the study of them.
Each would be as fortunate to have his story told by as skillful a writer and researcher as Statham-Drew, the preeminent economic historian of Western Australia. The volume of material she unearthed on Stirling could have ended up as a mish-mash of chronological tick-off-the-boxes: "Then he went here, and then he went there...". Statham-Drew draws a mutlti-dimensional picture of the man and his family which makes this an adventure tale of real interest and importance to an audience wider than just those with an interest in the earliest days of the Swan River Colony.
The book has been available since 2003 which makes this review perhaps "a day late and a dollar short". Besides Statham-Drew's indefatigable effort to uncover every interesting fact about and observation of Stirling, and her deftness at sharing same with the reader, it should be noted that the University of Western Australia Press has helped her present her material in the most attractive way imaginable. This is a book which is a delight to hold, page through, and admire. But, best of all, it is a very good book to read.
Ranenast
I found the book to be a very well written. The range of content amazing and the illustrations and photographs wonderful. As I am a fifth generation Western Australian and similarly connected to pioneers who settled in South Australia and Queensland I feel very proud of the achievements of my ancestors and Bless Pamela Streatham-Drew for giving us this remarkable book. I have a Degree in Australian Studies and Literature thus further increasing my enjoyment in this work. Also, as a member of the Murray Districts Society I have been privileged to meet with the author and listen to her talk on James Stirling and the Murray District.