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by Gil Henriques,Edgar Ascher,Terrance Brown,Jean Piaget
Download Morphisms and Categories: Comparing and Transforming fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Gil Henriques,Edgar Ascher,Terrance Brown,Jean Piaget
  • ISBN:
    0805803009
  • ISBN13:
    978-0805803006
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Psychology Press (February 1, 1992)
  • Pages:
    252 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
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    1853 kb
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    1933 kb
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    1825 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
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    829
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This first English translation of Piaget's work includes studies of children's understanding of geometric forms, machines, and abstract concepts.

This first English translation of Piaget's work includes studies of children's understanding of geometric forms, machines, and abstract concepts. It contains a clear statement of his mature position on continuity with biology as well as with the history of ideas. Studying this volume has been a very special experience for me, and I think it will also be for all those who take seriously Piaget's commitment to finding continuities between the psychogenesis of children's thinking and the historical development of ideas.

This valuable book, however, exemplifies why Piaget's ideas and theses have been somewhat difficult to. .Seymour Papert's Preface to "Morphisms and Categories" is excellent.

This valuable book, however, exemplifies why Piaget's ideas and theses have been somewhat difficult to apprehend, and why they remain so: they present an ever-evolving nonstationary constellation of ideas that have never been adequately reconciled and consolidated. Seymour Papert's Preface to "Morphisms and Categories" is excellent mathematical ideas as more than superficial metaphors?"

This valuable book, however, exemplifies why Piaget's ideas and theses have been somewhat difficult to apprehend, and why they remain so: they present an ever-evolving nonstationary constellation of ideas that have never been adequately reconciled and consolidated. Gil Henriques' chapter entitled "Morphisms and Transformations in the Construction of Invariants" was decidedly the most insightful and interesting to me.

Morphisms and Categories: Comparing and Transforming (Hardback). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. This first English translation of Piaget's work includes studies of children's understanding of geometric forms, machines, and abstract concepts.

Morphisms and Categories. Comparing and Transforming Jean Piaget, Gil Henriques y Edgar Ascher Tr. Terrance Brown Pref. STATEMENT OF SPONSORSHIP The Jean Piaget Society and the Fondation Archives Jean Piaget encourage translations of important works not yet translated, support retranslations of inadequately translated texts, foster consistent translation of technical terms, and provide translators with expert consultation.

By Jean Piaget, Gil Henriques, Edgar Ascher. G. Henriques, Morphisms and Transformations in the Construction of Invariants. E. Ascher, The Theory of Categories and Genetic Epistemology. Psychological Science.

by Edgar Ascher, Gil Henriques, Jean Piaget. Despite dissent in many quarters, Piaget's epistemology and the developmental psychology derived from it remain the most powerful theories in either field. From the beginning, Piaget's fundamental epistemological notion was that all knowledge is rooted in action, and for a long time, he identified action with transformation.

Jean Piaget, Gil Henriques, Edgar Ascher, Terrance Brown. Contents: T. Brown, About the Translation.

Book Publishing WeChat. New Interpretative Categories for Natural and Social Sciences. Piaget, . Henriques, . Ascher, E. and Brown, T. (1992) Morphisms and Categories: Comparing and Transforming. Comparing Oncotype DX Recurrence Score Categories with y Defined Luminal Subtypes. Yoshio Mizuno, Hiromi Fuchikami, Naoko Takeda, Junichi Yamada, Yuko Inoue, Hiroshi Seto, Kazuhiko Sato. 73023 1 880 Downloads 2 404 Views Citations. 55018 922 Downloads 1 352 Views Citations.

Morphisms and Categories: Comparing and Transforming by. Jean Piaget, Gil Henriques.

Despite dissent in many quarters, Piaget's epistemology and the developmental psychology derived from it remain the most powerful theories in either field. From the beginning, Piaget's fundamental epistemological notion was that all knowledge is rooted in action, and for a long time, he identified action with transformation. What is known is that which remains constant under transformatory action. This book represents a fundamental reformulation of that point of view. Alongside transformatory schemes, Piaget now presents evidence that nontransformatory actions -- comparisons that create morphisms and categories among diverse situations constitute a necessary and complementary instrument of knowledge. This work aims to elucidate that insight experimentally and theoretically and to understand the developmental interaction of comparing and transforming as knowledge is constructed. This first English translation of Piaget's work includes studies of children's understanding of geometric forms, machines, and abstract concepts. It contains a clear statement of his mature position on continuity with biology as well as with the history of ideas.

Cherry The Countess
Piaget asserted that he was an epistemologist, and not a development psychologist. His extensive clinical investigations into cognitive development of youths were motivated by his intent to establish empirical grounding for his genetic or constructivist epistemology (genetic as in genesis or origin, as opposed to hereditary endowment). Alas he has been virtually ignored by epistemologists with armchair proclivities, and largely misunderstood by psychologists who in considerable part have claimed him.

This valuable book, however, exemplifies why Piaget's ideas and theses have been somewhat difficult to apprehend, and why they remain so: they present an ever-evolving nonstationary constellation of ideas that have never been adequately reconciled and consolidated. This situation has been aggravated by his varied usages or foci of terms over the course of his many publications. It seems that he has always been just too busy keeping pace with the emergence of his seminal ideas to regroup and consolidate them in a coherent and encompassing baseline.

Michael Chapman's "Constructive Evolution" has been the best encompassing treatment of Piaget's ideas in my judgment, but it was published in 1988. Since then, Piaget's "Toward a Logic of Meanings" and the subject title have been published, with very significant contributions to Piaget's more elaborated and refined conclusions (1991 & 1992, respectively). Although I found "Toward a Logic of Meanings" quite readable on a stand-alone basis, the subject volume presumes substantial background in Piaget's prior (nonstationary) ideas. This book should have included an up-to-date abridgement of those ideas with which to orient its readers at the outset. As matters stand then, there is very appreciable backfilling for even a moderately well informed reader to accomplish in order to situate, integrate, and appreciate the newer ideas herein.

Seymour Papert's Preface to "Morphisms and Categories" is excellent. Given Piaget's stages of mathematical fixations (combinatorial logic, group theory, category theory) and their respective treatments, Papert wonders "whether I can really see Piaget's use of...mathematical ideas as more than superficial metaphors?" No wonder though: Piaget never makes a compelling case for his mathematical invocations; they remain powerfully suggestive but rather elusive. Nevertheless, Papert relates these mathematical formalisms to the latter three of Piaget's four stages of cognitive development, a rather insightful attribution that ought properly to have been explicitly noted by Piaget himself. Otherwise, one might conclude that there is a progression of superceding mathematical characterizations. Together, I believe that characteristically Piaget unrealistically presumes far too much readily familiar contextual/background knowledge on the parts of even his more motivated readers.

Papert's brief Introduction is also quite good, but it ought to have been somewhat more expansive. Here a few figures and/or tables would have been valuable for context and a baseline perspective upon which to assimilate the content of the book. For example, a description of a typical interaction between an epistemic subject and a newly encountered external object, augmented by an associated process flow diagram, could serve to situate and illustrate the roles/contributions of correspondence and assimilation/accommodation in extending/coordinating invoked schemes. This could clarify what is typically being compared and why it is, in a concrete operational scenario, as in coordinating observations and cognitive structures. This coverage could then lead into formal (fourth stage) operations per the higher-order abstraction capabilities of morphisms and categories, or namely this book's main message. Also, an associated table could enumerate and describe the respective operations employed in the representative interaction and its abstracted generalization. Such an illustrative scenario would serve to motivate, focus, and cohere the book's quite substantive content.

Of the fifteen ensuing chapters, the first twelve recount individual clinical investigations with child subjects wherein Piaget and various of his staff researchers relate their experiments and results to the book's title and themes. Cleverly formulated and aptly applied, the test scenarios provide an array of concrete examples that are variously illuminating, albeit sometimes a bit tedious to read through (though hardly the case I would presume for developmental psychologists).

Gil Henriques' chapter entitled "Morphisms and Transformations in the Construction of Invariants" was decidedly the most insightful and interesting to me. It contributes to closure with respect to the fourth stage of cognitive development per Papert's observation. The chapter on "The Theory of Categories and Genetic Epistemology," however, was entirely too brief and notationally suspect. Although a few figures are included here for much needed elucidation, the first one does not include the arrow that admits composition, or the depiction of the attendant property of commutativity. Nor is there sufficient text to clearly characterize the content of each of the figures here.

In all, this book includes a lot of valuable content. Yet much in the way of external Piagetian references is needed (for me at least) to coherently situate and functionally consolidate this book's content on morphisms and categories. But that would seem to be a nontrivial undertaking for anyone. Perhaps another Piagetian expositor like Michael Chapman will come along, but even his clone would need to shift primary focus toward an integrated cognitive process coupled with the supporting resources as employed by Piaget's `epistemic subject.'
The Sinners from Mitar
It is one of the most challenging books concerning the cognitive capabilities of young children. Without necessarily adhering to Piaget's belief that the personal human cognitive growth is an image of the cultural development, the notions of category, morphism etc. of Category Theory are related to the problems our kids have to tackle when learning basics like arithmetic.
This book contains many descriptions of actual observations of kids during their handling of tasks related to maps, and to map of maps. Piaget regarded duch handlings as the expression of the highest meaningful cognitive tools of abstract thinking. I wonder how many students of Education would be drawn to pay attention to these ideas of Piaget's. They should.
Fhois
challenging but satisfying...this is profound work