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by S. Papascoma,M. Heiss
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Social Sciences
  • Author:
    S. Papascoma,M. Heiss
  • ISBN:
    031212130X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0312121303
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Palgrave Macmillan; 1st edition (October 15, 1995)
  • Pages:
    356 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
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Papacosma, S. Victor, 1942-; Heiss, Mary Ann, 1961-. North Atlantic Treaty Organization, World politics. New York : St. Martin's Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on May 1, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Established in 1949, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) performed its assigned mission exceedingly well as it secured peace for its . Bibliographic Information. NATO in the Post-Cold War Era. Book Subtitle.

Established in 1949, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) performed its assigned mission exceedingly well as it secured peace for its member states and avoided military confrontation between the superpowers during the remaining four decades of the Cold War. But with the dramatic changes that began in 1989, an identity crisis has plagued NATO. Whereas the Cold War years had essentially defined who would be fighting whom in a future conflict, the uncertain post-1989 years are introducing new and possibly calamitous variables.

After the Cold War, NATO was reconceived as a organization whose mandate was to include two main .

After the Cold War, NATO was reconceived as a organization whose mandate was to include two main objectives: to foster dialogue and cooperation with former adversaries in the Warsaw Pact and to manage conflicts in areas on the European periphery, such as the Balkans. Simultaneously there was much discussion of the future of NATO in the post-Cold War era. Some observers argued that the alliance should be dissolved, noting that it was created to confront an enemy that no longer existed; others called for a broad expansion of NATO membership to include Russia.

post-cold war collective action problem". 3 Thus, already by the eve of the Madrid Summit, the question of enlargement had already ceased to be a genuinely critical issue in the "battle for consensus" within the Alliance - or at least found itself accompanied by others, politically more pushing ones. 4 If enlargement still was a contentious topic at Madrid, it. was a struggle about numbers - inviting three or five -, whereas in less obviously spectacular controversial points, there were and persist deep matter-of-fact dividing lines between the allies

Whereas the Cold War years had essentially defined who would be fighting whom in a future conflict

Established in 1949, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) performed its assigned mission exceedingly well as it secured peace for its member states and avoided military confrontation between the superpowers during the remaining four decades of the Cold War.

by S. Victor Papacosma, Mary Ann Heiss. There are not many appropriate occasions for a historian to play with counterfactual history. Published October 15, 1995 by Palgrave Macmillan.

Does NATO have a future? Topics: NATO, United States, Cold War Pages: 7 (2458 words) Published: February 27. .2. Heiss M. A. & Papacosma S. 1995, NATO in the Post-Cold War Era: Does It Have a Future?, Palgrave Macmillan, New York City.

Does NATO have a future? Topics: NATO, United States, Cold War Pages: 7 (2458 words) Published: February 27, 2014. Does NATO have a future? Lately the question about the future of NATO arises more often in media and articles on foreign policy and international security. 3. Kaplan . 2004, NATO Divided, NATO United: The Evolution of an Alliance, Praeger, Westport. 4. Kashmeri . 2011, NATO . Reboot or Delete?, Potomac Books In. Washington.

But I would argue that the Cold War circumstances were already in place .

But I would argue that the Cold War circumstances were already in place before April 4 th 1949, when NATO came into existence. When I was a student, one of the key books was written by a State Department's official, Anton DePorte. It was called : Europe between the super powers. alliances, the beginning of transparency for openness in the relationship, which was a powerful driver of all the change in Central and Eastern Europe.

On postcold war decentralization, see Dumbrell,, The Making of US Foreign Policy, pp. 153–63, 188–90. 68 See Rubinstein, A. ‘NATO Enlargement vs American Interests’, Orbis, 42:1 (1998), pp. 37–48. 69 See Citrin, J, Haas, E. Muste, C. and Reingold, . ‘Is American Nationalism Changing?

NATO Transformation of Strategies in Post Cold. War Era. NATO had to find a new balance between addressing its traditional. role centered in Europe, and tackling new global changes and threats.

NATO Transformation of Strategies in Post Cold. Transformation of strategies had to be created, through which the. following took place, enlargement of membership, effective cooperation. with the European Union, Partnership for Peace Initiative, opening. alliances with new countries, Crises management, fighting threats. beyond the European Atlantic areas, and cooperation with Southern.

Established in 1949, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) performed its assigned mission exceedingly well as it secured peace for its member states and avoided military confrontation between the superpowers during the remaining four decades of the Cold War. But with the dramatic changes that began in 1989, an identity crisis has plagued NATO. Whereas the Cold War years had essentially defined who would be fighting whom in a future conflict, the uncertain post-1989 years are introducing new and possibly calamitous variables. Despite the fact that hardly a voice has been heard calling for its dissolution and that states from the former Warsaw Pact are seeking membership, NATO's members face the demanding task of defining the new strategic challenges and formulating appropriate policies and responses. The articles in this volume combine to present a comprehensive investigation of the diverse problems confronting NATO. The contributions each provide relevant historical background before analyzing current conditions and projecting into the future. An opening essay offers an overview of NATO after forty-five years and is followed by others dealing with NATO's structural changes for the 1990s, NATO's shifting strategy, and NATO's developing connections with other international organizations, such as the United Nations, CSCE, and the European Community. The concluding part of the volume includes essays focusing on NATO's associations with the United States, the Anglo-American "special relationship," the Balkans, the former Warsaw Pact states, and the Middle East.