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by Timothy M. Smeeding,Lee Rainwater
Download Poor Kids in a Rich Country: America's Children in Comparative Perspective fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Timothy M. Smeeding,Lee Rainwater
  • ISBN:
    0871547023
  • ISBN13:
    978-0871547026
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Russell Sage Foundation (December 3, 2003)
  • Pages:
    273 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1718 kb
  • ePUB format
    1540 kb
  • DJVU format
    1947 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    841
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Poor Kids in a Rich C. .by Timothy M. Smeeding .

Poor Kids in a Rich C. In comparing the situation of American children in low-income families with their counterparts in fourteen other countries-including Western Europe, Australia, and Canada-they provide In Poor Kids in a Rich Country, Lee Rainwater and Timothy Smeeding ask what it means to be poor in a prosperous nation - especially for any country's most vulnerable citizens, its children. Rainwater and Smeeding find that while the child poverty rate in most countries has been relatively stable over the past 30 years, child poverty has increased markedly in the United States and Britain-two of the world's wealthiest countries.

Avoiding Linguistic Neglect of Deaf Children. Humphries et al. Pathways to the Overrepresentation of Aboriginal Children in Canada’s Child Welfare System. Trocmé et al. The Consequences of Decentralization: Inequality in Safety Net Provision in the Post–Welfare Reform Era. Bruch et al. An Introduction to Household Economic Instability and Social Policy. Hill et al. Is Student Loan Debt Discouraging Homeownership among Young Adults?

Rainwater, Lee. Publication date. Smeeding, Timothy M. Bookplateleaf.

Rainwater, Lee.

Taking the definition of poverty seriously I: Child poverty and inequity at the end of the twentieth century 1. Child poverty in rich countries in the 1990s: an overview 2. Patterns of child .

Personal Name: Smeeding, Timothy M. Rubrics

Rich Country, Lee Rainwater and Timothy Smeeding ask what it means to be poor in a prosperous nation - especially for any country's most vulnerable citizens. has been added to your Cart.

In Poor Kids in a Rich Country, Lee Rainwater and Timothy Smeeding ask what it means to be poor in a prosperous nation - especially for any country's most vulnerable citizens.

In Poor Kids in a Rich Country, Lee Rainwater and Timothy Smeeding ask what it means to be poor in a prosperous nation - especially for any country's most vulnerable citizens, its children.

In Poor Kids in a Rich Country, Lee Rainwater and Timothy Smeeding ask what it means to be poor in a prosperous nation - especially for any country's most vulnerable citizens, its children

In Poor Kids in a Rich Country, Lee Rainwater and Timothy Smeeding ask what it means to be poor in a prosperous nation - especially for any country's most vulnerable citizens, its children. In comparing the situation of American children in low-income families with their counterparts in fourteen other countries-including Western Europe, Australia, and Canada-they provide a powerful perspective on the dynamics of child poverty in the United States

InPoor Kids in a Rich Country, Lee Rainwater and Timothy Smeeding ask what it means to be poor in a prosperous nation - especially for any country's most vulnerable citizens, its children

InPoor Kids in a Rich Country, Lee Rainwater and Timothy Smeeding ask what it means to be poor in a prosperous nation - especially for any country's most vulnerable citizens, its children. In comparing the situation of American children in low-income families with their counterparts in fourteen other countries-including Western Europe, Australia, and Canada-they provide a powerful perspective on the dynamics of child poverty in the United States. In comparing the situation of American children in low-income families with their counterparts in fourteen other countries-including Western Europe, Australia, and Canada-they provide a powerful perspective on the dynamics of child poverty in the United States

Poor Kids in a Rich Country: America's Children in Comparative Perspective. United States Inequality through the Prisms of Income and Consumption. Johnson, S David, Timothy M. Smeeding, Barbara Boyle Torrey.

Poor Kids in a Rich Country: America's Children in Comparative Perspective. Lee Rainwater, Timothy M. The of Public Welfare.

In Poor Kids in a Rich Country, Lee Rainwater and Timothy Smeeding ask what it means to be poor in a prosperous nation - especially for any country's most vulnerable citizens, its children. In comparing the situation of American children in low-income families with their counterparts in fourteen other countries—including Western Europe, Australia, and Canada—they provide a powerful perspective on the dynamics of child poverty in the United States.

Based on the rich data available from the transnational Luxembourg Income Study (LIS), Poor Kids in a Rich Country puts child poverty in the United States in an international context. Rainwater and Smeeding find that while the child poverty rate in most countries has been relatively stable over the past 30 years, child poverty has increased markedly in the United States and Britain—two of the world's wealthiest countries. The book delves into the underlying reasons for this difference, examining the mix of earnings and government transfers, such as child allowances, sickness and maternity benefits, unemployment insurance, and other social assistance programs that go into the income packages available to both single- and dual-parent families in each country. Rainwater and Smeeding call for policies to make it easier for working parents to earn a decent living while raising their children—policies such as parental leave, childcare support, increased income supports for working poor families, and a more socially oriented education policy. They make a convincing argument that our definition of poverty should not be based solely on the official poverty line—that is, the minimum income needed to provide a certain level of consumption—but on the social and economic resources necessary for full participation in society.

Combining a wealth of empirical data on international poverty levels with a thoughtful new analysis of how best to use that data, Poor Kids in a Rich Country will provide an essential tool for researchers and policymakers who make decisions about child and family policy.