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by Aynsley J. Kellow,Sonja Boehmer-Christiansen
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Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Aynsley J. Kellow,Sonja Boehmer-Christiansen
  • ISBN:
    184064818X
  • ISBN13:
    978-1840648188
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Edward Elgar Pub (January 1, 2003)
  • Pages:
    214 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1910 kb
  • ePUB format
    1488 kb
  • DJVU format
    1541 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
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    279
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Sonja, Aynsley J. Kellow.

Sonja, Aynsley J. The Kyoto Protocol has singularly failed to shape international environmental policy-making in the way that the earlier Montreal Protocol had done. This highly topical book takes a frank look at the political motivations that underpin the global warming debate, and will appeal to political scientists and energy policy analysts as well as anyone with an interest in the future of the environment and in the policies we create to protect it.

and Kellow candidly argue that the Kyoto Protocol (2001) was not as successful as the earlier Montreal Protocol because of conflicting political interests

and Kellow candidly argue that the Kyoto Protocol (2001) was not as successful as the earlier Montreal Protocol because of conflicting political interests. Since the mid-1980s efforts have been made to combat global warming by reducing the emission of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide, generated by the combustion of fossil fuels, including coal and oil. The Kyoto Protocol to the Framework Convention on Climate Change was finally signed - without the USA - in November 2001 in Marrakesh.

Sonja, Reader of Environmental Politics, Department of Geography, Hull University, UK and Aynsley Kellow, Professor and Head, School of Government, University of Tasmania, Australia.

This book takes a look at the political motivations that underpin the global warming debate, and will appeal to. .Sonja, Emeritus Reader in Geography, University of Hull, UK and Aynsley Kellow, Professor Emeritus of Government, University of Tasmania, Australia.

This book takes a look at the political motivations that underpin the global warming debate, and will appeal to political scientists and energy policy analysts as well as anyone with an interest in the future of the environment and in the politics . Informazioni bibliografiche. International Environmental Policy: Interests and the Failure of the Kyoto Process.

International environmental policy: interests and the failure of the Kyoto process. A new process for negotiating multilateral environmental agreements? The Asia–Pacific climate partnership beyond Kyoto. Australian Journal of International Affairs 60 (2), 287-303, 2006. Edward Elgar Publishing, 2003. Promoting elegance in policy theory: Simplifying Lowi's arenas of power. Policy Studies Journal 16 (4), 713, 1988. G20 endorsement in post crisis global governance: More than a toothless talking shop? R Eccleston, A Kellow, P Carroll.

Sonja, Reader of Environmental Politics . The failure of Kyoto points to inadequacies in the current mechanisms. and Kellow have made a valuable contribution to understanding this failure and where solutions might emerge. The Kyoto Protocol has singularly failed to shape international environmental policy-making in the way that the earlier Montreal protocol did.

International Environmental Policy book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

International Environmental Policy book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking International Environmental Policy: Interests and the Failure of the Kyoto Process as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Why, they ask (1), was Kyoto so widely embraced? Unlike other complex international agreements, the Protocol has been iconized.

International Environmental Policy: Interests and the Failure of the Kyoto Process, Sonja and Aynsley Kellow, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2002, pp. xi, 214. This valuable critique of climate change politics is written by two of its leading observers. Why, they ask (1), was Kyoto so widely embraced? Unlike other complex international agreements, the Protocol has been iconized. To criticize it, they write, is to attack not only the moral crusade (104) of environmentalism but also the global development agenda (110).

Sonja (born 1942) is an Emeritus Reader in the Department of Geography at the University of Hull in Kingston upon Hull England, where she taught environmental policy, management and politics. Sonja was born in Dresden, East Germany.

The Kyoto Protocol has singularly failed to shape international environmental policy-making in the way that the earlier Montreal Protocol had done. Whereas Montreal placed reliance on the force of science and moralistic injunctions to save the planet, and successfully determined the international response to climate change, Kyoto has proved significantly more problematic. International Environmental Policy considers why this is the case.

The authors contend that such arguments on this occasion proved inadequate to the task, not just because the core issues of the Kyoto process were subject to more powerful and conflicting interests than previously, and the science too uncertain, but because the science and moral arguments themselves remained too weak. They argue that ‘global warming’ is a failing policy construct because it has served to benefit limited but undeclared interests that were sustained by green beliefs rather than robust scientific knowledge.

This highly topical book takes a frank look at the political motivations that underpin the global warming debate, and will appeal to political scientists and energy policy analysts as well as anyone with an interest in the future of the environment and in the policies we create to protect it.