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by William M. Harmening
Download The Criminal Triad: Psychosocial Development of the Criminal Personality Type fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    William M. Harmening
  • ISBN:
    0398079188
  • ISBN13:
    978-0398079185
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Charles C Thomas Pub Ltd (March 18, 2010)
  • Pages:
    294 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1280 kb
  • ePUB format
    1761 kb
  • DJVU format
    1764 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
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    993
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The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. William M. Harmening (Author). ISBN-13: 978-0398079192. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.

Topics include the evolution of crime, theoretical foundations, defining the criminal personality type, attachment in early childhood, moral development in middle-late childhood, morality and the criminal triad, identity formation i. .

Topics include the evolution of crime, theoretical foundations, defining the criminal personality type, attachment in early childhood, moral development in middle-late childhood, morality and the criminal triad, identity formation in adolescence, criminal beginnings, and intervention strategies. Harmening.

The Criminal Triad : Psychosocial Development of the Criminal Personality Type. by William M. What is it that compels a person to choose a life of crime and deviancy over one of responsibility and social conformity? To understand exactly how and why that choice is ultimately made, we must turn to the discipline of psychology.

By William Harmening. Charles C. Thomas, 2014. Whether it be Jack the Ripper in nineteenth-century England or Ted Bundy in 1970s America, the public has always been fascinated by the criminal offender type known as the serial killer. Professionals continue to speculate and develop new theories about their identity decades after their crimes ended. But what is it that causes such evilness in individuals that causes them to take an innocent life, not once but multiples times, and for no apparent reason beyond their own perverse psychological gratification?

by William M.

by William M.

What is it that compels a person to choose a life of crime and deviancy over one of responsibility . Online version: Harmening, William M. Criminal triad.

What is it that compels a person to choose a life of crime and deviancy over one of responsibility and social conformity? To understand exactly how and why that choice is ultimately made, we must. All Authors, Contributors: William M Harmening. Find more information about: William M Harmening.

The criminal triad: Psychosocial development of the criminal personality type. This dichotomy was therefore tested by the multidimensional scaling of the co-occurrence of 39 aspects of serial killings derived 100 murders committed by 100 . In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women's Development. Results revealed no distinct subsets of offense characteristics reflecting the dichotomy. They showed a subset of organized features typical of most serial killings. Disorganized features are much rarer and do not form a distinct type.

In Serial Killers, Harmening advances his criminal-triad theory in the first several chapters. 1. Harmening, W. The Criminal Triad: Psychosocial Development of the Criminal Personality Type. The theory focuses on key psychosocial developmental processes that occur between infancy and adolescence. The three components of the triad are attachment in early childhood, moral development as a child, and forma-tion of identity in adolescence. The author advances that, when successful, these processes in combination create an integrated internal deterrence mechanism. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas, 2010. Jennifer Piel, MD, JD Seattle, WA.

Book Publishing WeChat. (2010). Springfield: Charles C. Thomas. has been cited by the following article: TITLE: Is Street Art a Crime? An Attempt at Examining Street Art Using Criminology.

psychosocial development of the criminal personality type. Criminal psychology, Criminal behavior, Prediction of Criminal behavior. There's no description for this book yet. Published 2010 by Charles C Thomas in Springfield, Ill. Includes bibliographical references and index.

What is it that compels a person to choose a life of crime and deviancy over one of responsibility and social conformity? To understand exactly how and why that choice is ultimately made, we must turn to the discipline of psychology. The author presents and then deconstructs his own unique formulation of the internal deterrence system, and looks specifically at the psychosocial development of each of the proposed component parts- attachment, morality, and identity. He then weaves together an example of the developing child and the role played by parents, peers, and internal psychological processes in the development of a moral and socially responsible adolescent who is able to effectively self-deter from crime and deviancy, or, in the event of a problematic course of development, its unfortunate antithesis. Topics include the evolution of crime, theoretical foundations, defining the criminal personality type, attachment in early childhood, moral development in middle-late childhood, morality and the criminal triad, identity formation in adolescence, criminal beginnings, and intervention strategies. A new perspective of the criminal personality type that integrates original theory with ideas and constructs from the likes of Freud, Erikson, Kohlberg, and Bandura, among others, is discussed. The end result is an interpretive guide for identifying a child's criminal propensity in its pre-development stages, and a road map for effective mediation before they reach that critical situation where a wrong decision can have lifelong consequences. This resource will be of interest to criminal justice and legal professionals, criminal psychologists and psychiatrists, and those in social work, sociology, social welfare, and victimology.