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by Zeno Swijtink,Theodore Porter,Lorraine Daston,John Beatty,Lorenz Kruger,Gerd Gigerenzer
Download The Empire of Chance: How Probability Changed Science and Everyday Life (Ideas in Context) fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Zeno Swijtink,Theodore Porter,Lorraine Daston,John Beatty,Lorenz Kruger,Gerd Gigerenzer
  • ISBN:
    0521331153
  • ISBN13:
    978-0521331159
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (April 28, 1989)
  • Pages:
    360 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1379 kb
  • ePUB format
    1152 kb
  • DJVU format
    1643 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    919
  • Formats:
    lrf doc lit docx


How Probability Changed Science and Everyday Life. Gerd Gigerenzer, Zeno Swijtink, Theodore Porter, Lorraine Daston, John Beatty, and Lorenz Krüger. Cambridge University Press, New York, 1989. Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from Science. Message Body (Your Name) thought you would like to see this page from the Science web site. Your Personal Message.

9780521398381 -Ideas in Context: The Empire of Chance: How Probability Changed. item 3 Gigerenzer Gerd-Empire Of Chance (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW -Gigerenzer Gerd-Empire Of Chance (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW. £2. 4. An interdisciplinary work which tells how quantitative ideas of chance transformed the natural and social sciences, as well as daily life over the past three centuries, centering on how these technical innovations remade conceptions of nature, mind and society.

Электронная книга "The Empire of Chance: How Probability Changed Science and Everyday Life", Gerd Gigerenzer, Zeno Swijtink, Theodore Porter, Lorraine Daston, John Beatty, Lorenz Kruger

Электронная книга "The Empire of Chance: How Probability Changed Science and Everyday Life", Gerd Gigerenzer, Zeno Swijtink, Theodore Porter, Lorraine Daston, John Beatty, Lorenz Kruger. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Empire of Chance: How Probability Changed Science and Everyday Life" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Gerd Gigerenzer, Zeno Swijtink, Theodore Porter. The Empire of Chance tells how quantitative ideas of chance transformed the natural and social sciences, as well as daily life over the last three centuries. A continuous narrative connects the earliest application of probability and statistics in gambling and insurance to the most recent forays into law, medicine, polling and baseball. Separate chapters explore the theoretical and methodological impact in biology, physics and psychology

However, its subtitle ‘How probability changed science and everyday . While commendable on one level, the detail and style of The Empire of Chance may deter casual readers.

However, its subtitle ‘How probability changed science and everyday life’ indicates more about its content than its title. Rather than describe or delimit chance’s current empire, the perspective is historical. By the 1960s probabilistic and statistical ideas were actually providing theories to explain the manner in which the mind functions, and ultimately ‘transformed. the idea of what an explanation is’. The penultimate chapter briefly outlines some contemporary applications and the final chapter surveys important recurring issues.

The Empire of Chance tells how quantitative ideas of chance transform. Er ist mit Lorraine Daston verheiratet. Gerd Gigerenzer ist ein deutscher Psychologe und seit 1997 Direktor der Abteilung „Adaptives Verhalten und Kognition und seit 2009 Direktor des Harding-Zentrum für Risikokompetenz, beide am Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung in Berlin. Gigerenzer arbeitet über begrenzte Rationalität, Heuristiken und einfache Entscheidungsbäume, das heißt über die Frage, wie man rationale Entscheidungen treffen kann, wenn Zeit und Information begrenzt und die Zukunft ungewiss ist (siehe auch Entscheidung unter Ungewissheit).

This book tells how quantitative ideas of chance have transformed the natural and social sciences as well as everyday life over the past three centuries. A continuous narrative connects the earliest application of probability and statistics in gambling and insurance to the most recent forays into law, medicine, polling, and baseball. Separate chapters explore the theoretical and methodological impact on biology, physics, and psychology

We analyze how probability and statistics transformed our ideas of nature .

We analyze how probability and statistics transformed our ideas of nature, mind, and society. Ch 1: Classical probabilities, 1660–1840. In 1662 the English tradesman John Graunt used the London bills of mortality to approximate a mortality table by assuming that roughly the same fraction of the population died each decade after the age of six.

The Empire of Chance tells how quantitative ideas of chance transformed the natural and social sciences, as well as daily life, in the last three centuries. It connects the earliest applications of probability and statistics in gambling and insurance to the most recent forays into law, medicine polling and baseball. See all Product description. This is a very readable introduction to the origins and purposes of the use of the probability calculus.

Translating History of Science Books into Chinese: Why? Which Ones? How? . Science and Orthodox Christianity: An Overview.

Translating History of Science Books into Chinese: Why? Which Ones? How? Zhang. Nicolaidis et al. Ten Problems in History and Philosophy of Science. Introduction: The Humanities and the Sciences.

This book tells how quantitative ideas of chance have transformed the natural and social sciences as well as everyday life over the past three centuries. A continuous narrative connects the earliest application of probability and statistics in gambling and insurance to the most recent forays into law, medicine, polling, and baseball. Separate chapters explore the theoretical and methodological impact on biology, physics, and psychology. In contrast to the literature on the mathematical development of probability and statistics, this book centers on how these technical innovations recreated our conceptions of nature, mind, and society.

Mr.Bean
Speaking as a psychological scientist, the information conveyed in this book should be essential study for all students planning to conduct social science studies and analyze them with statistics. Period. The ideas conveyed in mainstream statistical education for 21st century social scienctists is still a incoherent mash of ideas in need of serious scrutiny. An important task for every scientist to take part in, and here is a place to start questioning and improving how we design studies and draw conclusions from their results. Mathematical techniques for analysis of studies is relatively new, yet it's treated as ancient ossified dogma. Bizarre. Reading this book will clear your mind in many ways if you are this type of reader. If you're a mathematician, or already know a lot of the history behind mainstream social science and statistics, you might be interested in books that cover even more marginal territories such as those mentioned by the other reviewer. For everyone else, say, if you don't know what the Neyman-Pearson theory of statistics is, you need to get this now.
Mave
This is an unusual book in several ways. It is devoted to neglected but important topics; the rise of statistical analysis and its impacts. It is also the product of not one, but several, authors though this is not a conventional multi-author book with individuals responsible for separate chapters. The opening sections of the book are interesting narratives of the emergence of statistical and probabilistic knowledge, culminating in the development of inferential statistics in the 20th century. As the authors point out, this was a hugely consequential development, arguably one of the most impactful intellectual developments of the last 2 centuries. The authors provide a nice analysis of the practical and theoretical issues that drove the emergence of modern statistical theories, with changing views of probability and the ways in which different strains of probability theory and statistical analysis interacted to produce interesting outcomes. The founders of statistical mechanics, for example, were clearly influenced by the role of statistics in the emerging social sciences. These sections also deal with interesting questions concerning the nature of scientific knowledge and determinism, and how these concepts changed over time. The discussion of the somewhat tangled history of the development of inferential statistics is quite good, revealing the somewhat ad hoc and mechanical way in which inferential methods were disseminated among a variety of scientific communities, the recipients often unaware of the important assumptions embedded in these methods.

The second half of the book is a more topical set of chapters looking at the impacts of statistical thinking in various domains. There are interesting discussions of the emergence of probabilistic thinking in physics, psychology, broader impacts in many aspects of society, a more philosophical discussion of concepts of determinism, and how statistical thinking has reshaped general standards of scientific conduct. The sections on psychology, where statistical thinking became a model for how the mind worked, and the general impact on scientific standards are the most interesting.

While published quite a few years ago, this remains an illuminating book and some of the issues discussed, such as the problems related the assumptions hidden in standard methods are currently important.
Paster
Gigerenzer(G)does a B+ discussion of the particular items he is interested in covering ,such as the conflict between Neyman(Pearson)and Sir Ronald Fisher over significance levels and confidence intervals and their meaning.However, there is practically no,or a very limited,discussion of the subjectivist theory of probability(Ramsey and de Finetti)or of the logical theory of probability(John Maynard Keynes and Rudolf Carnap).A potential reader ,who is interested in either of the above mentioned approaches to probability ,is forewarned that his curiosity will not be satisfied by reading this book.
Brakree
it deserves reading for any risk taker.