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by Adam Przeworski,Michael E. Alvarez,Jose Antonio Cheibub,Fernando Limongi
Download Democracy and Development: Political Institutions and Well-Being in the World, 1950-1990 (Cambridge Studies in the Theory of Democracy) fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Adam Przeworski,Michael E. Alvarez,Jose Antonio Cheibub,Fernando Limongi
  • ISBN:
    0521790328
  • ISBN13:
    978-0521790321
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (August 28, 2000)
  • Pages:
    340 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1954 kb
  • ePUB format
    1381 kb
  • DJVU format
    1620 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    247
  • Formats:
    azw doc mobi lrf


Is economic development conducive to political democracy? Does democracy foster or hinder material welfare? . is based on a rich data set covering most of the countries in the world from 1950 to 1990 and including dozens of variables.

Is economic development conducive to political democracy? Does democracy foster or hinder material welfare? These two questions are examined by looking at the experiences of 135 countries between 1950 and 1990. Descriptive information. With its quantitative skills it combines sophisticated analysis of the data. Latin American Politics and Society. This is the best defence of democracy of its generation. On almost every count, economic and humanitarian, it shows that democracy outperforms authoritarianism.

Democracy and Development. Political Institutions and Well-Being in the World, 1950–1990. Economic development does not generate democracies but democracies are much more likely to survive in wealthy societies. Political regimes have no impact on the growth of total national incomes, while political instability affects growth only in dictatorships. In general, political regimes have more of an effect on demography than on economics.

the World, 1950-1990 by Adam Przeworski, Michael E. Alvarez, José Antonio Cheibub an. Yet, this book could have been more thorough. Alvarez, José Antonio Cheibub and. Fernando Limongi. Carefully defining at the outset what constitutes a democracy, probit and. related analyses are used to predict regime type, the consequences of level of. development and of instability, and demographic aspects of well-being. ularly noteworthy is the enormous difference between democracies and dicta-. torships in their effects on people's lives. People live longer under democracy.

Democracy and Development book. Is economic development conducive to political democracy?. Democracy and Development (Cambridge Studies in the Theory of Democracy). 0521790328 (ISBN13: 9780521790321).

Is economic development conducive to political democracy? Does democracy foster or hinder material welfare? These two questions are examined by looking at the experiences of 135 countries between 1950 and 1990

Is economic development conducive to political democracy? Does democracy foster or hinder material welfare? These two questions are examined by looking at the experiences of 135 countries between 1950 and 1990. Descriptive information, statistical analyses, and historical narratives are interwoven to gain an understanding of the dynamics of political regimes and their impact on economic development and other aspects of material welfare. The findings, several of them quite surprising, dispel any notion of a trade-off between democracy and development.

Book Format: Paperback. Adam Przeworski; Michael E Alvarez; Boeschenstein Professor of Political Economy and Public Policy and Professor of Political Science Jose Antonio Cheibub. Is economic development conducive to political democracy? Does democracy foster or hinder material welfare? These two questions are examined by looking at the experiences of 135 countries between 1950 and 1990. Descriptive information, statistical analyses, and historical narratives are interwoven to gain an understanding of the dynamic of political regimes and their impact on economic development.

Political Institutions and Well-Being in the World, 1950–1990. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 2000, 321 . US $ 19,95 (paper). Authors and affiliations. Besprechungen Vergleichende Politikforschung. First Online: 01 March 2002.

Fourth, Lipset's hypothesis about economic development and democracy had since been supported by a vast literature of statistical studies (Adam Przeworski, Michael Alvarez, José Antonio Cheibub and Fernando Limongi, Democracy and Development: Political.

Fourth, Lipset's hypothesis about economic development and democracy had since been supported by a vast literature of statistical studies (Adam Przeworski, Michael Alvarez, José Antonio Cheibub and Fernando Limongi, Democracy and Development: Political Institutions and Well-being in the World, 1950-1990, New York, Cambridge University Press, 2000. Virtually every multivariate analysis of the determinants of democracy identifies economic development as a powerful factor

History of the World: Every Year - Продолжительность: 16:36 Ollie Bye Recommended for you.

History of the World: Every Year - Продолжительность: 16:36 Ollie Bye Recommended for you. 16:36. Великий" историк снова сел в лужу.

Michael E. Alvarez, José Antonio Cheibub, Fernando Limongi Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 1. .

Adam Przeworski, Michael E. Alvarez, José Antonio Cheibub, Fernando Limongi. Adam Przeworski, Michael E. Alvarez, José Antonio Cheibub, Fernando Limongi," The Journal of Politics 64, no. 2 (May, 2002): 670-672. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. The Parties in Our Heads: Misperceptions about Party Composition and Their Consequences. Hajnal et al. Political Homophily in Social Relationships: Evidence from Online Dating Behavior.

Is economic development conducive to political democracy? Does democracy foster or hinder material welfare? These two questions are examined by looking at the experiences of 135 countries between 1950 and 1990. Descriptive information, statistical analyses, and historical narratives are interwoven to gain an understanding of the dynamic of political regimes and their impact on economic development. The often surprising findings dispel any notion of a tradeoff between democracy and development. Economic development does not generate democracies, but democracies are much more likely to survive in wealthy societies.

Malogamand
I had a love/hate relationship with this book. First, and this is purely a stylistic point, I believe it could have been far better edited. It was an avalanche of statistics, statistical analyses, and presented results without a lot of discussion of why relationships emerged. Their first goal -- showing development does not "cause" democratization is, I believe, a revamp of earlier published work. It is, nonetheless, an important finding that is worth repeating.
More interesting is the relationship between dictatorships and demography, but, again, aside from a little theorizing and a few statistical tests I believe the authors do little to shed much light on why different regimes affect demography differently. They begin to flesh out an argument the crux of which revolves around the ability of democratic polities to "commit" to providing social welfare over the long run, but this seems to run counter to their initial dismissal earlier in the book of the Neo-Institutional economics claim put forth by Douglass North, among others, as to the importance of institutions in "binding the hands of the sovereign."
Finally, their results do show that democracies tend to survive in wealthy states, in essence becoming "unkillable" after a certain level of wealth is reached. They do little to really explain why this is, but the result gives credence to Lipset's thesis that devolpment, at the very least, helps sustain democracies.
Overall I liked to book and would reccommend it as an assigned book in a comparative politics/political economy class.
Jockahougu
Great
Ganthisc
It's a marvellous book. I took a course last year with Limongi about the book and it was great. The main feature I like in the book is the sophisticated discussion about selection bias in comparative politicas and how to avoid it. In fact the methodological discussions in it are fundamental to all schollars reaserching in comparative politics.

However, I think that some improvement could be made to the book in some statistical techniques used, and also in the reproducibility of the reasearch. Nowadays I would love to hace access to the code used to run regressions (altough I suspect they did it in SPSS), just to name one improvement possible on reproducibility. Besides, I think they should explicitly had treated some time correlation problem in their data.

Despite that, It is a great book and fundamental in any reasearch in comparative politics.
August
Too many conjectures and too many theories have been addressed concerning the relationship between polities and material well-being in the world. But they have been raised without a proper test of them, without empirics. This book completely cleans all kinds of intellectual garbages, clarifies the existing arguments, and above all provides a series of the sohpisticated tests. Adam Przeworski and his comrades did a marvelous job.