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by David L. Eng,Jack Halberstam,José Esteban Muñoz
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Social Sciences
  • Author:
    David L. Eng,Jack Halberstam,José Esteban Muñoz
  • ISBN:
    0822366215
  • ISBN13:
    978-0822366218
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Duke University Press Books (October 21, 2005)
  • Pages:
    316 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
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Social Text 84-85: What's.

David L. Eng. This special double issue of Social Text reassesses the political utility of the term queer. In sixteen timely essays, the contributors map out an urgent intellectual and political terrain for queer studies and the contemporary politics of identity, family, and kinship. The mainstreaming of gay and lesbian identity-as a mass-mediated consumer lifestyle and an embattled legal category-demands a renewal of queer studies that also considers the global crises of the late twentieth century. Collectively, these essays examine the limits of queer epistemology, the potentials of queer diasporas, and the emergence of queer liberalism.

This special double issue of Social Text reassesses the political utility of the term queer. Michael Cobb, David L. Eng, Roderick A. Ferguson, Elizabeth Freeman, Gayatri Gopinath, Judith Halberstam, Janet R. Jakobsen, Joon Oluchi Lee, Martin F. Manalansan IV, José Esteban Muñoz, Tavia Nyong’o, Hiram Perez, Jasbir K. Puar, Chandan Reddy, Teemu Ruskola, Nayan Shah, Karen Tongson, Amy Villarejo.

Start by marking What's Queer About Queer Studies Now . This special double issue of Social Text reassesses the political utility of the term queer

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In a 2005 special issue of Social Text, David Eng, Judith Halberstam, and José Esteban Muñoz ask, What’s queer about queer studies now? (Eng et al. 2005). In so doing, they both highlight emerging queer scholarship and call for renewed attention to the term itself, examining the ways in which the label continues to travel, a political metaphor without a fixed referent (Eng et al. 2005, p. 1). What, they ask, could queer studies tell us about globalization struggles and the work of the World Bank, or contemporary.

Social Text 84/85 2. /4 (Fall/Winter 2005)

Social Text 84/85 2. /4 (Fall/Winter 2005). Academic Departments.

October 30. Sharon Holland, The Erotic Life of Racism (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2012). Tuesday, October 30 and Wednesday, October 31: One-on-one meetings with professor to discuss final papers. November 6. Martin F. Manalansan IV, Global Divas: Filipino Gay Men in the Diaspora (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2003)

Find nearly any book by David L. Get the best deal by comparing .

Find nearly any book by David L. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9780822366218 (978-0-8223-6621-8) Softcover, Duke University Press Books, 2005.

84 Once the maternal Thing is screened through the paternal law, her terrifying desire becomes capable 79 ibid.

76 D. Eng, J. Halberstam, J. E. Munoz, What’s so Queer about Queer Studies Now? Introduction, p. 1. 77 ibid, p. 11. 78 ibid. In this way, the traumatic unsayable real is not what ‘curves’ symbolic space, by introducing gaps and consistencies in it, but is rather the effect of these gaps and inconsistencies. 81 Queer theory could gain much from a consideration of the real not as the terrifying primordial Thing that forever eludes our grasp, but as the distorting obstacle or screen that forever falsifies our relation to ‘reality. 84 Once the maternal Thing is screened through the paternal law, her terrifying desire becomes capable 79 ibid.

This special double issue of Social Text reassesses the political utility of the term queer. The mainstreaming of gay and lesbian identity—as a mass-mediated consumer lifestyle and an embattled legal category—demands a renewal of queer studies that also considers the global crises of the late twentieth century. These crises, which are shaping national manifestations of sexual, racial, and gendered hierarchies, include the ascendance and triumph of neoliberalism; the clash of religious fundamentalisms, nationalisms, and patriotisms; and the return to “moral values” and “family values” as deterrents to political debate, economic redistribution, and cultural dissent.

In sixteen timely essays, the contributors map out an urgent intellectual and political terrain for queer studies and the contemporary politics of identity, family, and kinship. Collectively, these essays examine the limits of queer epistemology, the potentials of queer diasporas, and the emergence of queer liberalism. They rethink queer critique in relation to the war on terrorism and the escalation of U.S. imperialism; the devolution of civil rights and the rise of the prison-industrial complex; the continued dismantling of the welfare state; the recoding of freedom in terms of secularization, domesticity, and marriage; and the politics of citizenship, migration, and asylum in a putatively postracial and postidentity age.Contributors. Michael Cobb, David L. Eng, Roderick A. Ferguson, Elizabeth Freeman, Gayatri Gopinath, Judith Halberstam, Janet R. Jakobsen, Joon Oluchi Lee, Martin F. Manalansan IV, José Esteban Muñoz, Tavia Nyong’o, Hiram Perez, Jasbir K. Puar, Chandan Reddy, Teemu Ruskola, Nayan Shah, Karen Tongson, Amy Villarejo