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by Robert S. Gilmour,Alexis A. Halley
Download Who Makes Public Policy?: he Struggle for Control between Congress and the Executive (Public Administration and Public Policy) fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Robert S. Gilmour,Alexis A. Halley
  • ISBN:
    1566430046
  • ISBN13:
    978-1566430043
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    CQ Press; 1 edition (January 1, 1994)
  • Pages:
    400 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1221 kb
  • ePUB format
    1567 kb
  • DJVU format
    1791 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    300
  • Formats:
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Who Makes Public Policy? book.

Who Makes Public Policy? book.

Who Makes Public Policy: The Struggle for Control between Congress and the Executive. Multiorganizational Policy Implementation: Some Limitations and Possibilities for Rational-Choice Contributions. Chatham, NJ: Chatham House. Graham, Cole Blease, and Hays, Steven . . In Games in Hierarchies and Networks: Analytical and Empirical Approaches to the Study of Governance Institutions, ed. Scharpf, Fritz . oulder: Westview.

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All Organizations Are Public: Bridging Public and Private Organizational Theory. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Brehm, John, and Scott Gates. Working, Shirking and Sabatoge: Bureaucratic Response to a Democratic Public. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Who Makes Public Policy: The Struggle for Control between Congress and the Executive. Chatham, Chatham House. Graham, Cole Blease, and Steven W. Hays. Managing the Public Organization.

The Public and its Policies Robert E. Goodin, Martin Rein & Michael Moran. 3. Part II institutional and historical background. Bea Cantillon is Professor of Social Policy, and Director of the Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp. Tom Christensen is Professor of Political Science, University of Oslo.

Publisher Name Springer, Cham. Online ISBN 978-3-319-31816-5. eBook Packages Economics and Finance. Number Of Entries 1524.

Public administration, the implementation of government policies. Today public administration is often regarded as including also some responsibility for determining the policies and programs of governments. Thank you for your feedback.

1 Handbook on Public Personnel Administration and Labor Relations .

Public Administration as a Developing Discipline (in two parts), Robert T. Golembiewski 2. Comparative National Policies on Health Care, Milton I. Roemer, . Exclusionary Injustice: The Problem of lllegally Obtained Evidence, Steven R. Schlesinger 4. Personnel Management in Government: Politics and Process, Jay M. Shafritz, Walter L. Balk, Albert C. Hyde, and David H. Rosenbloom 5. Organization Development

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Format of publication. The journal includes articles analyzing theoretical and practical issues in the areas of public policy and administration in Central and Eastern Europe.

Editors Robert S. Gilmour and Alexis A. Halley synthesize ten case studies sponsored by the National Academy of Public Administration that relate stories of congressional intervention and suggest, in sum, a new theory of congressional-executive relations. Arguing that Congress cannot be dismissed as a troublesome meddler in agency programs or as an inattentive bystander in its oversight role, Gilmour and Halley draw from these case histories the surprising conclusion that Congress in fact act regularly, with the exective branch, as a powerful "co-manager" of policy outlines and program details.