» » Police as Problem Solvers

Download Police as Problem Solvers fb2

by J.D. Grant,H. Toch
Download Police as Problem Solvers fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    J.D. Grant,H. Toch
  • ISBN:
    0306438453
  • ISBN13:
    978-0306438455
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Springer; 1 edition (May 31, 1991)
  • Pages:
    296 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1453 kb
  • ePUB format
    1184 kb
  • DJVU format
    1466 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    555
  • Formats:
    lrf lrf doc rtf


This book is about police and police reform and about a movement called "problem-oriented policing," which is sweeping the country. The problem-oriented approach has been labeled "a philosophical revolution" and "the cutting edge of policing" (Malcolm, 1989).

This book is about police and police reform and about a movement called "problem-oriented policing," which is sweeping the country. Two observers, Wilson and Kelling (1989), have written that the approach "con stitutes the beginning of the most significant redefinition of police work in the past half century" (p. 48). Such an esteemed development matters, and one expects knowledgeable persons to observe it and think about it.

Police as Problem Solvers. This book is about police and police reform and about a movement called "problem-oriented policing," which is sweeping the country. price for USA in USD (gross).

Police as Problem Solvers, eBook escrito por . Lee este libro con la aplicación Google Play Libros en tu ordenador o tus dispositivos Android o iOS. Descárgalo para leerlo sin conexión, resalta contenido, añade marcadores o toma notas mientras lees Police as Problem Solvers.

oceedings{Toch1991PoliceAP, title {Police as Problem Solvers}, author {Hans Toch and James Douglas Grant} .

oceedings{Toch1991PoliceAP, title {Police as Problem Solvers}, author {Hans Toch and James Douglas Grant}, year {1991} . Hans Toch, James Douglas Grant. Police As Problem Solvers. Are you sure you want to remove Police As Problem Solvers from your list? Police As Problem Solvers. How Frontline Workers Can Promote Organizational and Community Change. by Hans Toch, James Douglas Grant. Published September 30, 2004 by American Psychological Association (APA).

Books: Toch, H. Organizational Change through Individual Empowerment. Applying Social Psychology in Prisons and Policing Washington, DC: American Psychological Association (APA Books), 2014. Toch, H. Cop Watch: Spectators, Social Media, and Police Reform. Washington, D. American Psychological Association (APA Books). and Grant, . American Psychological Association (APA Books), 2005. and Adams, K. Acting Out: Maladaptive Behavior in Confinement. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, (APA Books) 2002.

Community oriented policing has been defined as. A law enforcement program that seeks to integrate officers into the local community to reduce. Toch, . & Grant, . crime and gain good community relations (Siegel & Senna, 2006, p. 155).

can promote organizational and community change by Hans Toch and J. Douglas Grant Find it in the Catalog. Police as Problem Solvers: how frontline workers can promote organizational and community change by Hans Toch and J. Douglas Grant. Find it in the Catalog.

Police as Problem Solvers: how frontline workers can promote organizational and community change by Hans Toch and J.

Police as Problem Solvers is a lively yet scholarly book written by a pioneer of the approach. Of special interest to psychologists will be verbatim material in the book about an innovative program designed to reduce police use of force. The authors describe the origin of this peer group approach to problems of violence, in which violence-involved individuals are engaged in systematic study of their own behavior.

This book is about police and police reform and about a movement called "problem-oriented policing," which is sweeping the country. The problem-oriented approach has been labeled "a philosophical revolution" and "the cutting edge of policing" (Malcolm, 1989). Two observers, Wilson and Kelling (1989), have written that the approach "con­ stitutes the beginning of the most significant redefinition of police work in the past half century" (p. 48). Such an esteemed development matters, and one expects knowledgeable persons to observe it and think about it. Our mission in this book is different from that of some observers, those concerned with management practice and philosophy. Ours is a more person-centered book, which views the problem-oriented move­ ment from the trenches where battles, not wars, are waged. We are concerned with what an erstwhile colleague of ours dubbed the "nitty­ gritty" and what others have called the "human equation." This is so because the core of our interest is on the experience of being problem oriented and how one engenders this experience. Coincidentally, such grass roots analysis happens to fit problem-oriented policing, which delegates thinking and planning to those on the frontlines. In the battles won by problem-oriented policing, ordinary police officers become generals or, at least, strategists of policing. The jobs that such men and women do are expanded, and we shall center on this expansion of the job.