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by Robert D. Blackwill,F. Stephen Larrabee
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Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Robert D. Blackwill,F. Stephen Larrabee
  • ISBN:
    0822309807
  • ISBN13:
    978-0822309802
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Duke University Press (July 28, 1989)
  • Pages:
    491 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
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This book addresses some of the key conceptual issues related to the NATO-Warsaw Pact Vienna talks on Conventional forces in Europe (CFE).

This book addresses some of the key conceptual issues related to the NATO-Warsaw Pact Vienna talks on Conventional forces in Europe (CFE). The chapters presented include: Constraints in Europe, Nuclear weapons and conventional arms control, and Approaches to conventional arms reductions.

Conventional Arms Control and East-West Security (Duke Press Policy Studies). Robert D. Blackwill is Henry A. Kissinger Senior Fellow for . Foreign Policy at the Council on Foreign Relations. Books by Robert D. Blackwill. 0822309920 (ISBN13: 9780822309925).

The Political Objectives of Conventional Arms Control Part One, Ian Cuthbertson, UK 90 Part Two, Laszlo Labody, Hungary 116 IV. The Military Objectives of Conventional Arms Control Part One, K. Peter Stratmann, FRG 140 Part Two, Alexander A. Konovalov, USSR 164 V. NATO/WTO Military Doctrine Part One, Peer H. Lange, FRG 186 Part Two, Andrei A. Kokoshin, USSR 212 VI.

Introduction, Robert D. Blackwill and F. Stephen Larrabee, USA xxiii. I. The General State of European Security. Stephen Larrabee, USA 462. Index 473. RightsBack to Top.

Title: Conventional Arms Control and East-­West Security. It is likely to have a significant influence on the course of these negotiations and on emerging debate on conventional arms control.

Institute of East–West Security Studies in New York from 1983 to 1989 In addition, he is the coauthor (with Julian Lindley-French) of Revitalizing the Transatlantic Security Partnership: An Agenda for Action.

Before joining RAND, Larrabee served as vice president and director of studies of the Institute of East–West Security Studies in New York from 1983 to 1989. F. Stephen Larrabee holds the Distinguished Chair in European Security at the RAND Corporation.

Format: Book; xli, 491 p. ; 24 cm.

Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.

Note: Durham, NC and London: Duke University Press, 1989. Subject: Arms control - Europe - Congresses. Subject: Europe - Defenses - Congresses. Subject: Security, International - Congresses.

Additional Information. 0-8223-0980-7 0-8223-0992-0.

Blackwill, Robert D. ; Larrabee, F. Stephen. Duke University Press 1989. Additional Information.

Conventional Arms Control and East-West Security.

The West's challenge after the Cold War is to build a new NATO to secure the alliance's unstable eastern and southern flanks. An expanded alliance not only betters the odds for East-Central Europe's political and economic reform. It also reduces the dangers of German-Russian rivalry, instability spilling west and rampaging nationalism. Conventional Arms Control and East-West Security. Foreign affairs (Council on Foreign Relations).

This important and timely work, prepared by the leading researchers, planners, and policymakers from both Eastern and Western alliances, analyzes the major issues in the Vienna talks on conventional forces in Europe involving NATO and Warsaw Pact nations. It is likely to have a significant influence on the course of these negotiations and on emerging debate on conventional arms control. The contributors met in Moscow prior to the Vienna conference to review and compare their analyses and revised them thereafter for publication in this work.